Onscreen text messages at the movie theater?

Ultimate Palace Cinema, Oxford by Jorge Royan via Wikimedia Commons.

Ultimate Palace Cinema, Oxford by Jorge Royan via Wikimedia Commons.

There is no other place in the world that can ease my anxiety or release my troubled mind than the cinema. There’s something special about watching a film on a large screen with like minded movie-goers surrounding you. And while I doubt this newfangled idea will catch-on, it’s still irritating to think about. Though, and I have to admit, that I’m often more annoyed by the loud popcorn crunchers and rustling wrappers than I am by someone looking at their phone.

via The Hollywood Reporter:

Theaters in major Chinese cities have starting experimenting with “bullet screens” on which audiences can send text messages commenting on the film, which are then projected directly onto the screen.

If you’re sensitive to people using their cellphones during a movie, then going to the movie theater in China would be far from relaxing experience.

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What This Man Did After Police Killed His Son Ten Years Ago

 

English: Pistol Glock 30 caliber 45 ACP, strip...

Michael Bell describes how his unarmed son was killed by a police officer, who was and immediately excused from accountability. The excuse of excessive force may be familiar, the officer claimed the victim went for his gun. Bell later went on to campaign for outside reviews for unarmed police shootings in Wisconsin. This approach adopted across the board combined with ending the war on drugs, demilitarizing,  and personal cameras on all officers would be ideal.

Via Politico:

After police in Kenosha, Wis., shot my 21-year-old son to death outside his house ten years ago — and then immediately cleared themselves of all wrongdoing — an African-American man approached me and said: “If they can shoot a white boy like a dog, imagine what we’ve been going through.”

I could imagine it all too easily, just as the rest of the country has been seeing it all too clearly in the terrible images coming from Ferguson, Mo., in the aftermath of the killing of Michael Brown.

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Why is the New York Times Pushing Pot?

EP - Detail of a New York Times Advertisement - 1895.jpg

One has to consider that the source of this op-ed by Liz Peek is Republican Party mouthpiece Fox News, but still it’s a question worth asking given the Times’ near-maniacal support of the marijuana legalization movement:

The legalize-pot bandwagon has a new conductor. With the single-mindedness of Hillary Clinton seeking the Oval Office, the New York Times is pushing for legalization of marijuana. The paper has published no fewer than eight editorials or op-eds approving speedy decriminalization of pot in just the past few weeks. What’s it all about?

Let us dismiss conjecture that the Times is gunning for a Public Service Pulitzer, which they have not won for a decade. Instead, two thoughts occur.

First, the Times may view decriminalizing marijuana as the next great progressive wave, following on the heels of same-sex marriage and, in earlier years, abortion rights. A smaller wave, to be sure, but one that liberals (and libertarians) can ride with enthusiasm.

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The Star Chamber: Episode 2: The Great Immigration Debate.

Intriguing Chat Show from DownUnder. The pace is languid, but the discussion is fascinating and relevant.

And the house-band are kind of weird (in a good way).

Hosts Richard Wolstencroft and David Thrussell
With Guests Richard Lowenstein and Mandy Kane

https://www.facebook.com/TheStarChamberTV

https://twitter.com/StarChamber_TV

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Delivery Services Today vs. The Delivery Services of 2000

This bicycle was located outside one of the restaurants in the Main Square in Krakow, Poland. By Tulio Bertorini via Wikimedia Commons.

This bicycle was located outside one of the restaurants in the Main Square in Krakow, Poland. By Tulio Bertorini via Wikimedia Commons.

As someone who’s used online delivery services (Fresh Direct), I hope they don’t meet the same demise.

via The New York Times (please follow the link to read the entire article):

Last year, I was excited to hear about a new start-up in San Francisco that delivered cheap bottles of wine within an hour. It was called Rewinery, and it was fantastic. I ordered a $5 malbec one day and a $10 chardonnay the next, delivered by bike courier for a modest fee. Already, San Francisco was crawling with bikes, inching up the hills, shuttling sushi and groceries and new clothes, all summoned with the tap of a finger. But Rewinery was the first of the delivery start-ups that made me feel the way I felt back in 2000, when I could order a video and a pint of ice cream to my doorstep from Kozmo.com.

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The Real Secret to Detecting Lies is Not Within Body Language

Jealousy and Flirtation, 1874

Jealousy and Flirtation, 1874.

via Psyblog:

Despite all the advice about lie detection going around, study after study has found that it is very difficult to spot when someone is lying.

Previous tests involving watching videos of suspects typically find that both experts and non-experts come in at around 50/50: in other words you might as well flip a coin.

Now, though, a new study published in Human Communication Research, has found that a process of active questioning yielded almost perfect results, with 97.8% of liars successfully detected (Levine et al., 2014).

The process of lie detection has nothing to do with supposed ‘tells’ like avoiding eye-contact or sweating, and everything to do with the way the suspect is questioned.

In the series of studies, participants played a trivia game in which they were secretly offered a chance to cheat.

In one experiment 12% cheated and in another 44.9% chose to cheat.

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Russia Wants Bulgarians to Stop Vandalizing Soviet Monuments To Look Like American Superheroes

Паметник на Съветската армия 18.06.2011

The Moscow Times is reporting that Bulgarian pranksters are repainting Soviet-era monuments so that the Soviet military heroes depicted are recast as American Superheroes (h/t to trans-atlantyk posting at reddit’s /r/worldnews):

Russia is demanding that Bulgaria try harder to prevent vandalism of Soviet monuments, after yet another monument to Soviet troops in Sofia was spray-painted, ITAR-Tass reported.

The Russian Embassy in Bulgaria has issued a note demanding that its former Soviet-era ally clean up the monument in Sofia’s Lozenets district, identify and punish those responsible, and take “exhaustive measures” to prevent similar attacks in the future, the news agency reported Monday.

The monument was sprayed with red paint on the eve of the Bulgarian Socialist Party’s celebration of its 123rd anniversary, the Sofia-based Novinite news agency reported.

The vandalism was the latest in a series of similar recent incidents in Bulgaria — each drawing angry criticism from Moscow…

[continues at Moscow Times]

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A Brief Look at Texting and the Internet in Film

H/T Laughing Squid

Tony Zhou of Every Frame a Painting explores depictions of texting and online interactions in film.

“Is there a better way of showing a text message in a film? How about the internet? Even though we’re well into the digital age, film is still ineffective at depicting the world we live in. Maybe the solution lies not in content, but in form.”

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The American Cult of Bombing

Car bombing in Iraq, 2005. Via Wikimedia Commons.

Car bombing in Iraq, 2005. Via Wikimedia Commons.

William J. Astore outlines America’s history of bombing and how we can expect more of it.

via TomDispatch (please follow the link to read the entire piece):

When you do something again and again, placing great faith in it, investing enormous amounts of money in it, only to see indifferent or even negative results, you wouldn’t be entirely surprised if a neutral observer questioned your sanity or asked you if you were part of some cult.  Yet few Americans question the sanity or cult-like behavior of American presidents as they continue to seek solutions to complex issues by bombing Iraq (as well as numerous other countries across the globe).

Poor Iraq. From Operation Desert Shield/Storm under George H.W. Bush to enforcing no-fly zones under Bill Clinton to Operation Iraqi Freedom under George W. Bush to the latest “humanitarian” bombing under Barack Obama, the one constant is American bombs bursting in Iraqi desert air.  Yet despite this bombing — or rather in part because of it — Iraq is a devastated and destabilized country, slowly falling apart at seams that have been unraveling under almost a quarter-century of steady, at times relentless, pounding.  “Shock and awe,” anyone?

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