Unsettling Post-Mortem Photographs from the Victorian Era

via Viral Nova [Please follow the link to see all of the photos]:

The Victorian Era was a pretty morbid time in human history. One of the most unsettling traditions of the era was the practice of post-mortem photography (that is, photographing the dead). By today’s standards, this is would be pretty taboo, but at the time it was seen as quite normal.

That doesn’t mean that seeing those pictures now makes them any less creepy, in fact it probably makes them even more creepy. Here are 21 of the most unsettling examples of Victorian post-mortem photography we could find. Warning. #13 might really freak you out.

9.) Notice the odd position of the curtain behind the boy? It’s likely there was someone behind it holding the boy’s head up.

desktop-1414521941

Read More: http://www.viralnova.com/post-mortem-victorian-photographs/

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So, You Want To Be A Porn Star?

81FRYScBcYL._SL1500_There is something unique about porn stars. It isn’t just the fact that they fuck a lot of people on camera, although that is surely attention getting. It goes deeper than that.

Society is obsessed and captivated with the sex industry. The men and women who work in the industry are often either adored or derided. But with every fantasy comes reality. So what is the reality for the stars in this business?

Some believe that porn stars must be different than the rest of us, and maybe even deficient in some way. They have to be right? Not just in what they do for a living but deep inside. How could someone spend their days having sex for money, and on camera no less? What is wrong with them? How could they do it? Aren’t they ashamed?

Others go the other route, they are starstruck by porn stars. They are in awe of the lifestyle, or what they consider it to be.… Read the rest

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Ouija Boards Are Even Creepier When You Know How They Work

By Jenna (cc by 2.0).

By Jenna (cc by 2.0).

via The Nerdist:

With Halloween just around the corner, it’s time to pull your Ouija board off that seldom dusted shelf and channel a spirit or two for answers to your most sleepover-enhancing questions. It’ll will be even creepier when you realize that the answers are coming from inside the house, inside you.

The Ouija board first appeared in stores in the 1890s, a mark of 19th century America’s obsession with spiritualism. It was a flat board with the letters of the alphabet written in two arced rows over a straight line of numbers, 0 through 9. The words “YES” and “NO” appear in the uppermost corners and “GOODBYE” is written at the bottom. The board comes with a planchette, a tear-drop shaped device on little feet with a hole in its body through which you can read the number or letter underneath it.

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Politics can interact with evolution to shape human destiny

Image from page 47 of "The descent of man, and selection in relation to sex" (1871)

Image from page 47 of “The descent of man, and selection in relation to sex” (1871)

Press Release via Eureka Alert:

Politics can have unintentional evolutionary consequences that may cause hastily issued policies to cascade into global, multigenerational problems, according to political scientists.

“Most western democracies look at policies as if they are bandages, we fix what we can and then move on,” said Pete Hatemi, associate professor of political science, Penn State. “But we need to consider generational policies so that we can fix what we can now, but also be prepared for what comes next.”

The researchers said that there is an interaction between political and cultural forces and evolutionary results. Genes can shape culture and political institutions, which in turn can shape biology and physiology, passing on certain traits to future generations. The environment’s influence on adaptation and how it changes biology is better known and often easier to observe, said Hatemi, but the way culture can affect gene expressions in future generations is often harder to show and may take longer to reveal itself.

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From Dictatorship to Democracy

Screen shot 2014-10-30 at 4.49.09 PMFrom Dictatorship to Democracy

Last night, whilst watching TV, a very interesting documentary was on, called How to Start a Revolution. I had never heard of the book “From Dictatorship to Democracy” before, nor how it had been instrumental to the Velvet and Orange revolutions of Eastern Europe, not to mention several other popular uprisings around the world (Arab Spring, etc.). The methodology in the book are tried, tested and have worked all around the world.

The 198 rules (in the appendix) are a road map to peacefully overthrowing a repressive regime and may represent human-kinds last best hope of changing our seemingly inevitable course towards climate induced species extinction.

This should be required reading for anyone who has any wish to change the current oligarchical status-quo of psychopathic elites willing to kill us all for a few more dollars.

You can read the full book here

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Batman at 75

Batman

While I’ve been posting all year about the William S. Burroughs centenary, I have yet to mark this illuminated text with the dark shadow of Batman who is celebrating his 75th anniversary this year. “The Caped Crusader,” “The Dark Knight,” “The World’s Greatest Detective,” first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in 1939.

Batman earned his own storylines. He was unique among comic book heroes in that he never had any super powers. Batman honed his intellect and built his body into a crime fighting machine fueled by his vow to avenge the homicidal death of his parents and restore justice to Gotham City. Batman’s lone vigilante origins also contributed to recent, noir interpretations that blur the line between the good and evil in the Batman universe. Questions like “Is Batman insane?” are common to the telling of his tale in a way that they could never be in the pages of Superman or Captain America.… Read the rest

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Acid Powered UFO’s From Hell: The Psychedelic Horror of Phil Mucci

thedukeAnyone that knows me knows that I’m an enormous fan of the band Monster Magnet. Maybe this has to do with a friend of mine playing Dopes to Infinity on repeat the first time I ever took LSD. Maybe it’s because Dave Wyndorf is a supernatural space wizard from outside of time. Whatever the reason, to this day I still probably watch the Negasonic Teenage Warhead video at least twice a year and have always been of the opinion that it’s up there with the best ever made. Unfortunately, they’ve never really had the budget to match that insanity until about a month ago when they dropped a new video for The Duke, from their brilliant 2013 “comeback” album Last Patrol. Just genius level shit going down there, and after finding myself watching it like 10 times over the period of a few weeks I was like, wait, who is the guy who directed this and more importantly, has he done anything else that’s equally as mind bending?… Read the rest

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‘Data smashing’ could automate discovery, untouched by human hands

Anthony Topper (cc by 2.0)

Anthony Topper (cc by 2.0)

via Kurzweil: Accelerating Intelligence:

From recognizing speech to identifying unusual stars, new discoveries often begin with comparison of data streams to find connections and spot outliers. But simply feeding raw data into a data-analysis algorithm is unlikely to produce meaningful results, say the authors of a new Cornell study.

That’s because most data comparison algorithms today have one major weakness: somewhere, they rely on a human expert to specify what aspects of the data are relevant for comparison, and what aspects aren’t.

But these experts can’t keep up with the growing amounts and complexities of big data.

So the Cornell computing researchers have come up with a new principle they call “data smashing” for estimating the similarities between streams of arbitrary data without human intervention, and even without access to the data sources.

Read More: http://www.kurzweilai.net/data-smashing-could-automate-discovery-untouched-by-human-hands

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Rolling Balls through the Mind: On the Virtues of Laziness

I could have a job, but am too lazy to choose it;

I have got land, but am too lazy to farm it.

My house leaks; I am too lazy to mend it.

My clothes are torn; I am too lazy to darn them.

I have got wine, but I am too lazy to drink;

So it’s just the same as if my cup were empty.

I have got a lute, but am too lazy to play;

So it’s just the same as if it had no strings.

My family tells me there is no more steamed rice;

I want to cook, but am too lazy to grind.

My friends and relatives write me long letters;

I should like to read them, but they’re such a bother to open.

I have always been told that Hsi Shu-yeh

Passed his whole life in absolute idleness.

But he played his lute and sometimes worked at his forge;

So even he was not so lazy as I.… Read the rest

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Tim Leary profile with John Higgs and an interview with Thad McKracken

Episode #126 of The Cult Of Nick descends into the net.

It features John Higgs, who writes an excellent blog here and tweets here.

The Discordian festival we refer to is in the UK. A website about it is here: http://cosmictriggerplay.com/

Thad McKracken writes frequently for Disinfo and has a facebook page which is very active here: https://www.facebook.com/thaddeus.mckraken His excellent book, which I get a co-editing credit for online, is here: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1500474681/disinformation

The music on this week’s podcast is from drone rockers, Quisling Meet, who tweet here: https://twitter.com/quislingmeet

I tweet here: https://twitter.com/NickMargerrison

Nick Margerrison

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