Hamster Wheel Standing Desk

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I’ve often contemplated purchasing a standing desk as I have to sit for long hours. Now there’s this newfangled invention: The Hamster Wheel Standing Desk. As nifty as it is, I can’t help but find it disheartening how sedentary most of us have become these days. What’s even worse is that it’s not necessarily a choice we get to personally make. Office life and the typical 9-5 has forced our hand.

via Instructables.com

You are not reaching your current productivity potential. Numerous esteemed experts agree that standing is better than sitting and that walking is better than standing. Despite this, your workplace only provides inhumane chairs and stagnant standing desks for you to use while you struggle to get through a workday full of distractions and bodily pains.

Rise up, sedentary sentients, and unleash that untapped potential within by marching endlessly towards a brilliant future of focused work. Step forward into a world of infinite potential, bounded only by the smooth arcs of a wheel.

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[Poll] Which torture device/method is the most heinous?

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This week, we’re going take a darker turn with our polls and vote on which torture device/method is the most heinous.

Quick recap of “The Most Damaging President of The Last 50 Years”

By far the largest poll we’ve run! As always, thanks to everyone who voted. I let this one go for two weeks as it kept growing larger and larger.

  • George W. Bush (45%, 1,626 Votes)
  • Barack Obama (22%, 784 Votes)
  • Ronald Reagan (17%, 628 Votes)
  • Richard Nixon (5%, 175 Votes)
  • George H. W. Bush (5%, 173 Votes)
  • Lyndon B. Johnson (3%, 105 Votes)
  • Bill Clinton (1%, 50 Votes)
  • Jimmy Carter (1%, 48 Votes)
  • John F. Kennedy (1%, 34 Votes)
  • Gerald Ford (0%, 12 Votes)

Total Voters: 3,635

I was actually surprised to see Obama beat Reagan, but I assumed that George W. Bush would take the cake.

Which torture device/method is the most heinous?

All definitions were taken from the respective Wikipedia pages, unless otherwise noted.… Read the rest

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Better Things – The Life and Choices of Jeffrey Catherine Jones

Jeff catherine jones

Who Was Jeffrey Catherine Jones?

Frank Frazetta once called Jones the “greatest living painter.”

Born in 1944, Jones first published a comic book in 1965 (Blazing Combat #1). Jones quickly grew to popularity within the art community and went on to paint “covers for books, including the Ace paperback editions of Fritz Leiber’s Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser series and Andre Norton’s Postmarked the Stars, The Zero Stone, Uncharted Stars and many others. For a period during the early 1970s she also contributed illustrations to Ted White’s Fantastic. Jones drew many covers and short stories for a variety of comics publishers including DC Comics, Skywald Publications, and Warren but generally avoided the superhero genre.”

In 1998, Jones underwent hormone therapy. According to Steven Ringgenberg at The Comics Journal, “It’s now known from the artist’s personal writings that she had felt conflicted about her gender since childhood, always feeling a greater affinity for the fair sex than for her own maleness.Read the rest

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Kevin Smith’s TUSK Memorabilia Giveaway

1940001_527693247359457_755596116126798391_nTusk is creepy, enthralling and infused with Kevin’s distinct sense of humor.

Disinfo is honored to be running a giveaway of Tusk goodies for Kevin Smith’s highly anticipated horror-comedy. Tusk recently premiered at the Toronto Film Festival to rave reviews. Personally, I’ve been looking forward to this one for a while now, which makes this giveaway even more exciting for me!

Plot

The idea for Tusk came about when Smith saw a hoax-ad on Gumtree. The ad’s creator asked that any potential lodgers agree to wear a Walrus costume for 2 hours a day in exchange for free rent. Go here to see the advert in all its glory.

A rehash of the plot by Henry Barnes at The Guardian (who gave the film four out of five stars):

 Silly and sick, with very little blubber, Tusk, a comedy-horror about a man who is turned into a walrus, is the first great Kevin Smith film since Dogma.

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Wealthy L.A. Schools’ Vaccination Rates Are as Low as South Sudan’s

I know there are lot of pro- and anti-vaccination readers who are going to want to weigh in on this, so without comment from me either way, consider the resurgence of whooping cough in LA, where vaccination rates are, according to The Atlantic, “as low as south Sudan’s”:

When actors play doctors on TV, that does not make them actual doctors. And that does not mean they should scour some Internet boards, confront their pediatricians, and demand fewer vaccinations for their children, as some Hollywood parents in Los Angeles have apparently been doing.

The Hollywood Reporter has a great investigation for which it sought the vaccination records of elementary schools all over Los Angeles County. They found that vaccination rates in elite neighborhoods like Santa Monica and Beverly Hills have tanked, and the incidence of whooping cough there has skyrocketed…

Parents in these schools are submitting a form called a “personal belief exemption,” which states that they are not vaccinating their kids due to “a diffuse constellation of unproven anxieties, from allergies and asthma to eczema and seizures,” reporter Gary Baum writes.

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Free Radical Media Podcast: Mathematics, Education and True Learning with chycho

via chycho

A few weeks ago I was contacted by the folks at Free Radical Media to see if I would be willing to be a guest in their fledgeling podcast network. I checked out some of their work and really liked what I found, so I nervously agreed – I’ve never been a guest on a podcast before.

We ended up discussing a myriad of topics focused on mathematics, education, and some of the problems associated with our centralized systems as well as some of the solutions available to us at the moment.

It was a very fun experience and I would like to thank Eric and Patrick for having me as a guest. Below you will find the podcast.

FRM – Mathematics, Education and True Learning with chycho

For those interested in further exploring some of the topics that we discussed, you will find additional information regarding these topics at:

 

 

 

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A Case for Abolishing Juvenile Prisons

Juvenile Detention Center by Stuart McAlpine via Flickr. (CC by 2.0)

Juvenile Detention Center by Stuart McAlpine via Flickr. (CC by 2.0)

By Sara Mayeux via The Awl (follow the link to read the rest of this piece, this article is long-ish):

Last month, archaeologists identified the first of the fifty-five human bodies recently exhumed at Florida’s Dozier School for Boys—a now-shuttered juvenile prison where, for decades, guards abused children, sometimes to death, despite cyclical scandals and calls for reform spanning almost a hundred years. Dozier represents an atrocious extreme, but the failures of America’s juvenile justice system are widespread. Whether labeled “boot camps,” “training schools,” “reformatories,” or other euphemisms, juvenile prisons have long harbored pervasive physical and sexual abuse. In one survey, twelve percent of incarcerated youth reported being sexually abused in the previous year—a figure that likely understates the problem.

During the “tough-on-crime” years of the eighties and nineties, states confined larger numbers of children than ever before, with the proportion of youth in prison reaching an all-time high in 1995.

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Infographic: The Fatal Wounds of King Richard III

Via Live Science:

A study of King Richard III’s bones uncovered 11 injuries inflicted near the time of death by common Late Medieval weapons. Although the king was wearing armor in battle, the head injuries are consistent with his helmet having been lost or removed. A pelvis injury was likely inflicted after death.

Four of the wounds to the face, skull and ribs were likely due to dagger stabs. Another, likely fatal, wound to the rear of the skull, was likely due to a sword strike. The largest wound to the head, penetrating deep into the brain, likely came from either a sword or the spike atop a halberd.

[Read the full story on the postmortem analysis of Richard III's Skeleton]

Chart shows dagger, sword and halberd wounds to the king's skeleton.

Source:LiveScience

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Say You Want a Revolution: The Invisibles Started 20 Years Ago

invisiblesWhen people ask me what my favorite pieces of psychedelic literature from the last 20 years are, I immediately tell them Graham Hancock’s Supernatural and Grant Morrison’s The Invisibles without even having to think twice about it. Of course, I’m not sure if anyone I’ve ever told this has actually taken my advice and read either one, but I’ll just keep repeating it in the off hope that at least one person will have their mind blown by the genius of either one of those epics. When people ask me for suggestions regarding books about magick, The Invisibles immediately jumps to the top of my list. This usually leads to someone arguing with me and informing me that The Invisibles isn’t an instruction manual on how to do magick to which I reply, that’s exactly the point. Since you can sum up basic sigil magick techniques in a few paragraphs, and chaos magick was supposed to be about pushing these techniques forward and creatively fitting them to your subjective microverse, I have zero idea why books regurgitating technique are even of much value at this point.… Read the rest

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