Refusing To Wage War

"Critics of police violence, all those who call for demilitarized law enforcement and an acknowledgement of America’s institutional racism, are, yet again, but with even more self-righteous ferocity, declared the enemy." (Photo: The All-Nite Images/flickr/cc)

“Critics of police violence, all those who call for demilitarized law enforcement and an acknowledgement of America’s institutional racism, are, yet again, but with even more self-righteous ferocity, declared the enemy.” (Photo: The All-Nite Images/flickr/cc)

Robert C. Koehler writes at Common Dreams:

And so we grieve over another national tragedy.

Two New York City police officers, Wenjian Liu and Rafael Ramos, were shot — assassinated — as they sat in their patrol car this past weekend. Let the needlessness of their deaths rip our hearts open. Let the humanity come first.

“Now is a moment for empathy and deep listening.”

The words are from a statement issued by #BlackLivesMatter, a grassroots movement emerging this year over the spate of police killings of young men of color. The murder of the officers is part of the same tragedy. Black lives matter. Blue lives matter. All lives matter. Any thinking that embraces less than this is part of the problem, not the solution.

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Anton LaVey Blackhouse Photographs 1998 by Nicholas Syracuse

 Nicholas Syracuse "LaVey Altar" 2012 courtesy of Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn

Nicholas Syracuse “LaVey Altar” 2012 courtesy of Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn

 

Anton LaVey Blackhouse Photographs 1998 by Nicholas Syracuse 2012.

The house and HQ for the Church of Satan in San Francisco.

The house was leveled to make way for some cheap condos.

The murals were designed and painted by Anton LaVey, founder of the Church of Satan, according to information provided to the photographer by LaVey’s daughter Karla.

Included in the exhibition “Abundatia Cornu Copiae” December 4 – February 28 2015

The photographs were taken in 1998 and printed in 2012.

at Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn

http://www.shishigami.com/srfa/copiae/

 

 Nicholas Syracuse "Octo" 2012 courtesy of Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn

Nicholas Syracuse “Octo” 2012 courtesy of Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn

 

 Nicholas Syracuse "Fire" 2012 courtesy of Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn

Nicholas Syracuse “Fire” 2012 courtesy of Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn

 

 Nicholas Syracuse "Devil" 2012 courtesy of Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn

Nicholas Syracuse “Devil” 2012 courtesy of Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn

 

 Nicholas Syracuse "Merbeast" 2012 courtesy of Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn

Nicholas Syracuse “Merbeast” 2012 courtesy of Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn

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This Weird Side Effect Nearly Torpedoed The Practice Of Anesthesia

Otis Historical Archives National Museum of Health and Medicine (CC BY 2.0)

Otis Historical Archives National Museum of Health and Medicine (CC BY 2.0)

via io9:

It’s 1844, and surgeries are brutal, agonizing, and necessary slapdash. One man promises he can make it so patients feel no pain. He proves it with a patient who screams hysterically throughout a short procedure. Here’s how a side effect of laughing gas nearly strangled anesthesiology in its cradle.

The Fiasco of 1844

Medical students at Harvard fought to cram themselves into an operating theater for an unprecedented procedure. A dentist had been making the rounds, claiming that he had a gas, nitrous oxide, that could stop a patient from feeling pain during a procedure. At that time, all surgery rooms came equipped with a table, some good strong lights, and a group of even stronger men who would hold the writhing patient down while the surgeons cut flesh and sawed through bone. Successful surgeons were fast surgeons.

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Origins of the Police

The Five Points district of lower Manhattan, painted by George Catlin in 1827. New York’s first free Black settlement, Five Points was also a destination for Irish immigrants and a focal point for the stormy collective life of the new working class. Cops were invented to gain control over neighborhoods and populations like this.

The Five Points district of lower Manhattan, painted by George Catlin in 1827. New York’s first free Black settlement, Five Points was also a destination for Irish immigrants and a focal point for the stormy collective life of the new working class. Cops were invented to gain control over neighborhoods and populations like this.

Via Works in Theory

In England and the United States, the police were invented within the space of just a few decades—roughly from 1825 to 1855.

The new institution was not a response to an increase in crime, and it really didn’t lead to new methods for dealing with crime. The most common way for authorities to solve a crime, before and since the invention of police, has been for someone to tell them who did it.

Besides, crime has to do with the acts of individuals, and the ruling elites who invented the police were responding to challenges posed by collective action.

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Do Women Make Better Leaders? [Debate]

From the boardroom to politics we look to increase the representation of women. But if women were dominant what impact would it have? Might women be best suited to 21st century culture and create a productive economy and less conflictual politics? Or is this utopian and sexist nonsense?

The Panel

Darwinian philosopher Helena Cronin, Labour politician Diane Abbott, and Morgan Stanley Vice-President Niamh Corbett consider a change of culture.

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David Barton’s Plan for Biblical Slavery for America

fusion-of-horizons (CC BY 2.0)

fusion-of-horizons (CC BY 2.0)

From 2011, Hrafnkell Haraldsson writing at PoliticusUSA:

On the WallBuilders website, home of David Barton, ideological advisor to both Glenn Beck and Mike Huckabee, you will find an article by Stephen McDowell, a colleague of his, explaining the joys of biblical slavery. As Bruce Wilson writes on Talk To Action,

Christian Reconstructionism endorses “Biblical slavery” and founder of the movement R.J. Rushdoony expressed the sentiment that African-Americans were lucky to be slaves, writing, “Granted that some Negroes were mistreated as slaves, the fact still remains that nowhere in all history or in the world today has the Negro been better off.”.

It wasn’t that the Southern system was wrong, you see, for endorsing slavery; it was wrong because it wasn’t biblical slavery. And America awake!: R.J. Rushdoony asserts that what was permissible according to Biblical scripture is permissible now: including slavery.

As Wilson writes,

McDowell’s article cites R.J.

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Understand the Mysteries of Spacetime

New Adventures in Spacetime - Eleanor Knox

For the online-education-interested, the Institute of Art and Ideas has started updating their free online courses with short teaser videos that give a feel for what a course will be like.

One of these is “New Adventures in Spacetime“, a fascinating course by philosopher of physics Eleanor Knox from King’s College in London. Why not spend a few holiday hours wrapping our heads around what physicists talk about when they talk about spacetime?

The details of the course can be found here – or see the whole list of IAI Academy courses here.

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What Are Those Strange Things You See Floating In Your Eye?

photo credit: Andrew Enright, "Floaters" Flickr, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

photo credit: Andrew Enright, “Floaters” Flickr, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

via IFL Science:

Have you ever noticed a strange little worm-like speck drifting aimlessly about in your field of vision? These annoying little squiggly lines, or “cobwebs,” are called floaters and are experienced by around 70% of people. So what are they?

Floaters are actually shadows cast by objects suspended in the clear, gel-like substance that makes up the majority of the eye’s interior. This substance is called vitreous humor and helps to maintain the eye’s round shape. After passing through the lens, focused light has to pass through the vitreous humor in order to reach the retina at the back of the eye. It’s mostly composed of water but also contains proteins and various other substances.

Floaters are normally merely proteins of the vitreous gel that have clumped together. These stringy clusters of proteins block light and therefore cast a shadow on the retina.

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