Beam Me Up? Teleporting Is Real, Even If Trekkie Transport Isn’t

Geoff Brumfiel via NPR:

“I have a hard time saying this with a straight face, but I will: You can teleport a single atom from one place to another,” says Chris Monroe, a biophysicist at the University of Maryland.

His lab’s setup in a university basement looks nothing like the slick transporters that rearrange atoms and send them someplace else on Star Trek. Instead, a couple million dollars’ worth of lasers, mirrors and lenses lay sprawled across a 20-foot table.

“What they do in the TV show is, they send the atoms over a long distance,” says David Hucul, who recently got his Ph.D. with Monroe. “But, really — if you could build anything, you wouldn’t send the atoms.”

That’s because atoms are big and heavy, and you don’t really need them, he explains. The laws of physics say that any atom of carbon is identical to any other atom of carbon.

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Fear and Loathing in Thet Kal Pyin: Myanmar’s Healthcare Crisis

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Staffan Scherz (CC BY 2.0)

As Myanmar prepares for a historic election on 8 November 2015, its leadership is rolling out plans for dramatic health sector reforms. But there are enormous obstacles, including the legacy of war and a rising threat of drug-resistant infectious diseases in restive border areas. Mike Ives reports.

Two speakers send the Islamic call to prayer sailing across Thet Kal Pyin, a refugee camp less than 100 km from Myanmar’s border with Bangladesh. The call wafts over several neat rows of large, low-slung buildings with blue roofs. Several families live in each structure, and the camp is home to around 5,000 people. Most, if not all, belong to the Rohingya ethnic group, a persecuted Muslim minority.

In response to the prayer call, bearded men in sandals emerge into the gathering dusk. They file into a thatched pavilion that serves as their makeshift mosque. At its entrance, they wash their hands and remove their shoes.… Read the rest

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Charles Bukowski On Writing

Buk

I try to do all of my writing during the week. Songs I’ll write anytime. Poems anytime. But everything else gets pushed away at least once a week. It seems I’m always editing something or getting a blog post together by Sunday evening, but mostly, during the weekends, words are for reading.

Nowadays that means reading the articles I’ve streamlined into my Flipboard feed. I’ve got a pretty big ass phone at this point and it doubles as a very readable, little tablet.

This weekend I came across some news that a new Charles Bukowski book was going to be released. On Writing illuminates the author’s wordcraft with the help of a hitherto undiscovered cache of Buk’s letters.

“If a man truly desires to write, then he will. Rejection and ridicule will only strengthen him …There is no losing in writing, it will make your toes laugh as you sleep, it will make you stride like a tiger, it will fire the eye and put you face to face with death.

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Is There Really A Psychopath Gene?

A single gene has been linked with being a psychopath — and it’s very controversial – reports Tanya Lewis at Business Insider:

As of yet, no single factor can explain what causes people to behave in ways labeled psychopathic. But research suggests our genes may play a role.

Edward Hopper's The House by the Railroad, used as inspiration for the look of the Bates house in the movie "Psycho."

Edward Hopper’s The House by the Railroad, used as inspiration for the look of the Bates house in the movie “Psycho.”

 

One gene in particular is linked with an increased risk of violent or aggressive behavior, studies have found.

Known as MAOA (monoamine oxidase A), this “warrior gene” controls the production of a protein that breaks down brain-signaling chemicals like dopamine, noradrenalin, and serotonin, which all influence mood.

But the idea of a “psychopath” gene remains controversial.

A gene for psychopathy?

People with a variant of the gene, called MAOA-L, produce less of the protein that breaks down these signaling chemicals, which in turn causes them to build up.

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Horror Occult Geekery: The Psychedelic Secret of Dario Argento’s SUSPIRIA

This article contains spoilers for the 1977 film SUSPIRIA.

Watch it.

Preferably while comfortably dosed up on your favourite psychedelic substance.

suspiria-poster

I’ve been an ardent fan of the shadowy occult strangeness found in late 70s-early 80s Italian horror flicks for a good chunk of this incarnation, for reasons I used to find hard to fathom.

I’ve often felt too that there was some concrete textual core shared between a lot of these movies, specifically the films that came in the wake of the briefly popular “Giallo” subgenre. Giallo, a genre where POV killers adorned with black leather gloves go on fetishised killing sprees as clueless detectives scratch their heads in an artistically blood-spattered wake. In which the camera was the killer.

These post-Giallos, mainly of Argento’s own making, but also the more ethereal Zombie films of Lucio Fulci, i.e. Gates of Hell (aka City of The Living Dead) and The Beyond (aka Seven Doors of Death), seem to share some dark strand of DNA between them.… Read the rest

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Hackers Can Disable A Sniper Rifle – Or Change Its Target

tp750 rifle

TrackingPoint self-aiming rifle.

Hot off their success at forcing Jeep to recall 1.4 million vehicles due to their vulnerability to being taken over by hackers, the gang at Wired is focusing on sniper rifles that can be hacked. Yes you read that right…

Put a computer on a sniper rifle, and it can turn the most amateur shooter into a world-class marksman. But add a wireless connection to that computer-aided weapon, and you may find that your smart gun suddenly seems to have a mind of its own—and a very different idea of the target.

At the Black Hat hacker conference in two weeks, security researchers Runa Sandvik and Michael Auger plan to present the results of a year of work hacking a pair of $13,000 TrackingPoint self-aiming rifles. The married hacker couple have developed a set of techniques that could allow an attacker to compromise the rifle via its Wi-Fi connection and exploit vulnerabilities in its software.

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Gonzo Box

Gonzo

I was recently reading a fun UPROXX article about Hunter S. Thompson’s appearing in pop culture. Of course this didn’t include the good doctor’s own contributions to said pop culture. This article mostly talked about biopics like Where the Buffalo Roam, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, and The Rum Diaries. But it was also smart enough to mention Spider Jerusalem in the mix and savvy commenters were quick to add Colonel Hunter Gathers from the Venture Bros. cartoon.

I really like all of these Hunter happenings, but nothing beats the man himself. Here’s a bit about the Gonzo Tapes which give us the clearest glimpse we’re likely to get of the mad one’s demons and angels…

…from early missives on the Hells Angels and classic selections from Thompson’s seminal Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas to trenchant 1972 presidential campaign coverage and reportage from the front lines of the Vietnam War.Read the rest

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The Oil Industry is Going Solar

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Zachary Shahan writes at Climate Crock of the Week:

There’s no way around it — the future of energy is solar energy. But here’s the fun part: the future starts now.

Solar panels have been on the market for decades, but saying solar panels of today are the same as solar panels of the 1990s is like saying phones of today are like phones of the 1990s. True, you can’t play Tetris on your solar panels or listen to music via them, but who wants to climb onto a record-hot roof to do that anyway? Getting back to the central point here, it’s that the cost of solar has fallen off a cliff, and solar power is increasingly the cheapest option around. (see graph above).

Solar power prices are falling so fast that it’s hard for just about anyone to keep up. Last year, many of us jumped for joy as a record-low solar PPA was signed in Austin, Texas (for 5 cents/kWh).

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The Grateful Dead were decades ahead of their time

Over the Fourth of July weekend, the Grateful Dead performed a farewell series of shows at Chicago’s Soldier Field, celebrating 50 years as a band.

Reading about these final sets brought me back to the 1970s, when I attended a New Hampshire summer camp as a boy.

During those summers, I’d noticed that my counselors were steeped in the culture of the band. It wasn’t just endless discussions of shows, songs, versions of songs and surprising set lists (Would they ever play Dark Star? Would Phil ever sing again?); it was also a dedication to the ethos of understated generosity, environmental stewardship and a nonjudgmental attitude to other people’s lifestyles.

That was the spirit of the band and their fans, known as Deadheads.

Even then, the band was an outlier in a music industry that has always enjoyed a fair dose of control over artists, imaging, marketing and ticket sales. And the almost stereotypical image of the money-grubbing music executive of the midcentury rock-and-roll era (exemplified by Tom Hanks’ character in the 1996 film That Thing You Do) seems, in retrospect, quite accurate.… Read the rest

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42 Years Later, Officers Charged for Murder of Defiant Chilean Folk Singer

"Víctor Jara" by Source. Licensed under Fair use of copyrighted material in the context of Víctor Jara">Fair use via Wikipedia.

Víctor Jara” by Source. Licensed under Fair use via Wikipedia.

This post originally appeared on Common Dreams. To see more of Sarah Lazare’s articles, go here.

More than four decades after the Chilean military tortured and killed beloved folk singer, playwright, and social activist Victor Jara during the coup of General Augusto Pinochet, former officers allegedly involved in the murder are finally facing charges.

Judge Miguel Vázquez Plaza on Wednesday announced homicide and kidnapping charges against 10 former military officers, including former lieutenant Pedro Barrientos Nuñez, a resident of Florida who is seeking to avoid extradition to Chile. Four of the people indicted have already turned themselves in, and arrests are expected to follow.

Charges were also levied Wednesday for the slaying of Littre Quiroga Carvajal, former military police chief.

Jara’s widow, Joan Turner Jara, told reporters that the development offers a “message of hope,” but she went further, saying “we’re pushing forward in demanding justice for Victor with the hope that justice will follow for everyone.”

Over 40,000 people were tortured, murdered, or held as political prisoners during Pinochet’s dictatorship, which lasted for decades and was backed by the United States.

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