Sick-Outs and Walk-Outs: Students and Teachers Escalate Fight Against Censorship of History

Students from Columbine High School protest proposed changes to AP History curriculum last week. (Photo: John Lebya/@presto89/Twitter)

Students from Columbine High School protest proposed changes to AP History curriculum last week. (Photo: John Lebya/@presto89/Twitter)

More updates on the attempted censorship of history in school districts Jefferson County, Colorado.

via Deirdre Fulton at Common Dreams:

A passionate coalition of teachers and students in Jefferson County, Colorado are continuing their fight against censorship this week, employing some of the very tactics the conservative school board wants to eliminate from history textbooks.

Seventy-two of 102 teachers at Golden and Jefferson high schools called in absent on Monday, forcing both schools to close for the day; teacher “sick-outs” also closed two high schools on September 19.

Meanwhile, several dozen students from Carmody Middle School walked out of classes on Tuesday morning, marking the first time younger students have joined an ongoing protest by teachers and high schoolers against proposed changes to the district’s history curriculum. Hundreds of students from the majority of the county’s 17 high schools have staged walk-outs and protests over the last two weeks.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

The Cult of Neil deGrasse Tyson

Neil deGrasse Tyson - NAC Nov 2005.jpg

Are you a fan of Neil deGrasse Tyson? You know, the fellow who took picked up the mantle of Cosmos from Carl Sagan. He’s definitely the most famous astronomer of our time, but as with anyone reaching certain heights of fame, he’s now attracting critics, Rich Lowry of Politico among them:

Neil deGrasse Tyson is a very famous and popular scientist. He even has a TV show. And wears a cool astronomical vest. Only he’s not infallible.

This rather basic truth has been established over the past couple weeks, over much resistance and at the cost of much abuse, by Sean Davis of the lively new conservative website, the Federalist.

Davis dug into a handful of just-so stories repeated by Tyson in his public lectures, the point of which is to make himself — and by extension, his audience — feel superior to the dolts who aren’t nearly as scientific as he is.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Smart and Smarter Drugs

8354791187_a8970f08c5_bAre we asking the right questions about smart drugs? Marek Kohn looks at what they can do for us – and what they can’t.

“You know how they say that we can only access 20 per cent of our brain?” says the man who offers stressed-out, blank-screened ‘writer’ Eddie Morra a fateful pill in the 2011 film Limitless. “Well, what this does, it lets you access all of it.” Morra, played by Bradley Cooper, is instantly transformed into a superhuman by the fictitious drug NZT-48. Granted access to all cognitive areas, he learns to play the piano in three days, finishes writing his book in four, and swiftly makes himself a millionaire.

Limitless is what you get when you flatter yourself that your head houses the most complex known object in the universe, and run away with the notion that it must have powers to match. More down to earth is the idea that we always have untapped cognitive potential, but that life gets between us and the best we could possibly manage.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

Silicon Valley man unwittingly invites fugitive into home amid manhunt

By Christian Rondeau via Flickr.

By Christian Rondeau via Flickr.

via Reuters:

(Reuters) – A Silicon Valley homeowner unwittingly welcomed a fugitive into his home and shared a meal with the wanted man as California law enforcement officers canvassed the neighborhood in a manhunt, police said on Tuesday.

Police in Palo Alto launched the search after receiving an emergency call on Monday about a possible fraudulent bank transaction linked to a man wanted in Oklahoma for a sex crime with a minor, the city’s police department said.

Officers tried to nab 35-year-old Dominique Tabb of San Francisco at the bank, but he hopped a fence and ran into a residential neighborhood where officers began a yard-to-yard search, Palo Alto Detective Sergeant Brian Philip said.

A homeowner in his 60s saw Tabb in his yard with some minor scrapes, and Tabb told him that assailants had beaten him up and that he was trying to escape, police said.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Daniele Bolelli Hosts Graham Hancock on The Drunken Taoist Podcast

Two of our favorite authors, Daniele Bolelli (50 Things You’re Not Supposed To Know: Religion) and Graham Hancock (Supernatural, Entangled), finally get together and talk on Daniele’s Drunken Taoist podcast:

Listen Here

The topics for discussion include:

  • Embracing fiction and saying goodbye to footnotes!
  • Ayahuasca approves of Graham’s fiction
  • At the crossroad of good and evil: choices
  • The demiurge from Graham’s lips: demons hiding in divine clothing
  • If your theology leads you to kill in the name of God, what you are worshipping is a demon
  • Please support Graham’s fiction novels
  • Moctezuma and Cortes: the battle of evil against evil
  • St. Peter and the Aztec war god: different masks for the same entity
  • Totalitarians are all the same
  • Graham offers a history lesson
  • Powerful female characters
  • Gonzalo Guerrero
  • The publishing cage… Graham and the memory of publishers with guts
  • The Stephen King experiment
  • Graham makes a great offer to Drunken Taoist listeners
  • Graham and replying to emails
  • Why Daniele doesn’t get shit done
  • Graham and TED
  • A Japanese editor carried a resignation letter for six weeks in case his choice to support “Fingerprints of the Gods” didn’t work out
  • A timeline of human history and the mystery of the last ice age
  • How Graham transitioned to becoming a writer
  • Martin Mystere
  • Graham about death and the nature of the universe

Read the rest

Continue Reading

The Undying Stars – Was Ancient Man Connected Through Star Myth, Shamanism and Megaliths?

IMG_6010Via Midwest Real

Join Author, David W. Mathisen and I as we hack our way through the gnarled nether-regions of history, philosophy and a litany of other woo-drenched topics. 

Imagine the level of genius and insanity it must have taken to pitch the idea of of constructing the Great Pyramid of Giza– “Let’s take 2.3 million stones weighing up to 80 tons each that fit together seamlessly to create the world’s tallest structure. Also, let’s make sure it aligns to true north, mimics Orion’s belt, measures equinoctial precession and encodes roughly a shit ton of other astral and mathematical phenomena.”Best pitch ever, right?

Despite the fact that my pitch sounds totally bat shit bonkers, the Egyptians were far from the only ones who undertook such a herculean labor. There are dozens of ancient megalithic structures with countless astral alignments and striking similarities all over the world. Yet, if we take that observation a step further, positing the idea that many ancient cultures had sacred traditions built upon a common, interconnected, esoteric system that communicated transcendent truth via celestial allegory, myth and megaliths, we’re starting to get pretty deep into the hairy nethers of history– a place where mainstream academia dares not dwell.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

The Origin of Witches

Johann Heinrich Füssli 019

The Three Witches (Johann Heinrich Füssli)

“Where do witches come from?” asks Alastair Sooke at BBC Culture:

Ask any Western child to draw a witch, and the chances are that he or she will come up with something familiar: most likely a hook-nosed hag wearing a pointy hat, riding a broomstick or stirring a cauldron. But where did this image come from? The answer is more arresting and complex than you might think, as I discovered last week when I visited Witches and Wicked Bodies, a new exhibition at the British Museum in London that explores the iconography of witchcraft.

Witches have a long and elaborate history. Their forerunners appear in the Bible, in the story of King Saul consulting the so-called Witch of Endor. They also crop up in the classical era in the form of winged harpies and screech-owl-like “strixes” – frightening flying creatures that fed on the flesh of babies.

Read the rest
Continue Reading