Man who ate napkins to conceal insider trading pleads guilty

By Ged Carroll via Flickr (CC by 2.0)

By Ged Carroll via Flickr (CC by 2.0)

via Reuters:

A Brooklyn, New York mortgage broker, who would scribble secret stock tips on napkins and pass them to an accomplice in Grand Central station before eating them, pleaded guilty to insider trading on Friday, federal prosecutors said.

Frank Tamayo, 41, was the middleman in what prosecutors called a three-man scheme that generated $5.6 million in illegal profits over five years, based on tips about a dozen transactions being negotiated by a prestigious New York law firm.

Tamayo, who had been cooperating with authorities, pleaded guilty to securities fraud, tender offer fraud, and conspiracy charges in the federal court in Trenton, New Jersey, according to U.S. Attorney Paul Fishman in New Jersey.

The defendant also agreed to forfeit more than $1 million, the contents of two brokerage accounts, and a 2008 Audi Q7. He faces up to 20 years in prison on the fraud counts.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

DatC #047 – The Witch’s Eight Paths of Power with Lady Sable Aradia

iTunesStitcherDirect DownloadRSS

047_lady_sable_aradiaHello and thank you once again for joining me down at the crossroads for some music, magick, and Paganism. Where witches gather for the sabbath, offerings are made, pacts are signed for musical fame and we cross paths with today’s most influential Pagans, occultists, and deep thinkers. Tonight, we meet with witch, High Priestess, blogger, and author Lady Sable Aradia to discuss her new book The Witch’s Eight Paths to Power: A complete course in magick and witchcraft. We have a great, friendly, and open discussion as we go into her experiences with writing the book as well as delving into some of its more controversial aspects, like ritual drug use, such as the incorporation of intoxicants and entheogens, and the heavy topic of sex in initiation within certain forms of traditional based Wicca.

In his Book of Shadows, Gerald Gardner writes about the witch’s Eightfold Way as a means of developing one’s magickal abilities.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Banana Peel and Ugly Art Win Ig Nobel Awards

The 24th First Annual Ig Nobel Prize ceremony, organized by the magazine Annals of Improbable Research, took place this week. From Reuters:

Researchers who measured the slipperiness of banana peels, the ability of pork strips to stop nosebleeds, and the reactions of reindeer to humans in polar bear suits were among the winners of this year’s Ig Nobel prizes for comical scientific achievements.

The annual prizes, meant to entertain and encourage global research and innovation, are awarded by the Annals of Improbable Research as a whimsical counterpart to the Nobel Prizes which will be announced next month.

Among the 10 awards, four went to researchers that took a peculiar interest in food. A team of Japanese scientists earned the Ig Nobel Physics Prize, for example, for detailing the hazards of stepping on a banana peel in their paper titled “Frictional Coefficient under Banana Skin.”

Other teams earned prizes for studying what happens in the brains of people who see the face of Jesus in their toast, how infant poop can be used in the production of fermented sausages, and how pork strips can be stuffed into peoples’ nostrils to stop severe nosebleeds…

[continues at Reuters]

Read the rest

Continue Reading

DatC #046 – The Always Relevant Jason Pitzl-Waters

iTunesStitcherDirect DownloadRSS

046_jason_pitzl-watersHello and thank you for joining me down at the crossroads for some music, magick, and Paganism where witches gather for the sabbath, offerings are made, pacts are signed for musical fame and we cross paths with today's most influential Pagans, occultists, and deep thinkers. Tonight, we meet with the humble and always relevant founding editor of the Wild Hunt Blog Jason Pitzl-Waters to discuss his work, his very personal post titled The 3rd Degree: Exploitation and Initiation, as well as his Wild Hunt editorial Wagging the Dog, and we close with a glimpse into the upcoming event FaerieCon East which I look forward to attending. Jason and I have a great discussion and cover some heavy topics concerning the future of the Pagan community.
Continue Reading

Internet Trolls Are Narcissists, Psychopaths, and Sadists

Mitt på golvet stod en öppen kista och sutto två förskräckliga troll.jpg

A new study shows that internet trolls really are just terrible human beings, reports Psychology Today, to absolutely no one’s surprise:

In this month’s issue of Personality and Individual Differences, a study was published that confirms what we all suspected: internet trolls are horrible people.

Let’s start by getting our definitions straight. An internet troll is someone who comes into a discussion and posts comments designed to upset or disrupt the conversation. Often, it seems like there is no real purpose behind their comments except to upset everyone else involved. Trolls will lie, exaggerate, and offend to get a response.

What kind of person would do this?

Canadian researchers decided to find out. They conducted two internet studies with over 1,200 people. They gave personality tests to each subject along with a survey about their internet commenting behavior. They were looking for evidence that linked trolling with the Dark Tetrad of personality: narcissism, Machiavellianism, psychopathy, and sadistic personality…

[continues at Psychology Today]

Read the rest

Continue Reading

Why we love repetition in music

via Brain Pickings:

How and why this happens is precisely what cognitive scientist Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis, director of the Music Cognition Lab at the University of Arkansas, explores in On Repeat: How Music Plays the Mind (public library). This illuminating short animation from TED Ed, based on Margulis’s work, explains the psychology of the “mere exposure effect,” which makes things grow sweeter simply as they become familiar — a parallel manifestation of the same psychological phenomenon that causes us to rate familiar statements as more likely to be true than unfamiliar ones.

Continue reading.

Read the rest

Continue Reading

Study Finds That Martian Soil May Be Usable for Farming

Graph taken from Vox.com

Graph taken from Vox.com.

When we asked if you would rather terraform Mars or mitigate climate change, much of the Disinfo community replied with: both! Well, according to this Vox article, growing plants with Martian soil might be more probable than previously thought.

via Vox:

If we ever wanted to permanently colonize Mars, one thing seems probable: we’d have to figure out how to grow some food there.

This raises an interesting question: could we use Martian soil to do it?

Previously, NASA researchers had speculated that we’d have to either grow food hydroponically on Mars, or ship soil there from Earth. But a new study published in the journal PLOS ONE suggests that using Martian soil might actually be a possibility.

In it, researchers found that plants actually grew better in a simulated Martian soil than in nutrient-poor soils found on Earth (and Martian soil seems to be more suitable than lunar soil).

Read the rest
Continue Reading

700-year-old skeleton couple were uncovered still holding hands

These lovebirds have held hands for the past 700 years. | Credit: University of Leicester Archaeological Services

These lovebirds have held hands for the past 700 years. | Credit: University of Leicester Archaeological Services

via Live Science:

The skeletal remains of two lovebirds were uncovered, after being locked in a romantic embrace for the past 700 years.

Archeologists found the happy couple holding hands in an earthen grave during an excavation of a “lost” chapel in Leicestershire, England, researchers reported Thursday (Sept. 18).

“We have seen similar skeletons before from Leicester where a couple has been buried together in a single grave,” Vicki Score, University of Leicester Archaeological Services (ULAS) project manager, said in a statement.

Double graves are not that unusual. But it’s surprising that the two bodies were buried at the so-called “lost” chapel of St Morrell, only recently discovered by a local historian and a team of researchers, instead of at the local church. [8 Grisly Archaeological Discoveries]

“The main question we find ourselves asking is why were they buried up there?

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Entheodelic Storytelling: A Conversation with Gabriel D. Roberts

Quest For GnosisPAPERI recently had the distinct pleasure of catching up with my good friend Gabriel D. Roberts, author of The Quest for Gnosis. He is making his first foray into fiction very soon with a new book called The Hermit.

***

BR: Gabe, one of the things I like so much about the way you deliver ideas is that it is both honest and raw while also “getting to the heart of things” in a very rapid manner. What were some of the initial things that inspired The Quest for Gnosis?

I wanted to make a fast track for the serious seeker who was tired of the dogmatic mire of big religion and I knew that I alone would fall short of delivering such a tome. It made sense to employ the minds of those very people who shaped and influenced my perspectives. This is a refinement of my own journey that I hope will make it easier for the neophyte to grow.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

Embattled Childhoods May Be the Real Trauma for Soldiers With PTSD

Spc. Mitchell Eidsvold (left), Spc. Michael Hons (center), and Sgt. Scott Jenson (right) of the 191st Military Police Company race toward the finish line of the Fallen Soldiers Memorial 12K run, while wearing full combat equipment and carrying the American Flag. The run took place in Devils Lake, N.D. on June 23, 2012. U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. Brett Miller, 116th Public Affairs Detachment. By The U.S. Army via Flicker (CC by 2.0)

Spc. Mitchell Eidsvold (left), Spc. Michael Hons (center), and Sgt. Scott Jenson (right) of the 191st Military Police Company race toward the finish line of the Fallen Soldiers Memorial 12K run, while wearing full combat equipment and carrying the American Flag. The run took place in Devils Lake, N.D. on June 23, 2012. U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. Brett Miller, 116th Public Affairs Detachment. By The U.S. Army via Flicker (CC by 2.0)

Via the Association for Psychological Science:

New research on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in soldiers challenges popular assumptions about the origins and trajectory of PTSD, providing evidence that traumatic experiences in childhood – not combat – may predict which soldiers develop the disorder.

Psychological scientist Dorthe Berntsen of Aarhus University in Denmark and a team of Danish and American researchers wanted to understand why some soldiers develop PTSD but others don’t. They also wanted to develop a clearer understanding of how the symptoms of the disorder progress.

Read the rest
Continue Reading