[Poll] Favorite Film Genre

826 PARANORMAL (CC by  2.0)

826 PARANORMAL (CC by 2.0)

Happy Halloween, Disnfonauts. I hope you all have a good and safe weekend. We’re starting a new poll today, a little bit different than some of the others–and definitely more mundane. With that being said, it’s something that I’ve been curious about for quite sometime now. I want to know your favorite film genre. Of course there is a lot of overlap, and I tried to stay away from the sub-genres (the list would be giant with them). I’d also like to note the contention around animation: is it really a genre? Or is it a technique that encompasses all genres? Personally, I always hesitate to definitively label it as a genre, but a lot of folks do, so I’m including it here.

The last poll was a simple “yes” or “no” question.

Have you ever had a paranormal experience?

  • Yes (64%, 526 Votes)
  • No (36%, 296 Votes)

Total Voters: 822

I was hoping for stories in the comments!… Read the rest

Continue Reading

The Illusion of Democracy

Hartwig HKD (cc by-nd 2.0).

Hartwig HKD (cc by-nd 2.0).

via News Junkie Post:

From people’s rule to a broken social contract.

It is ironic, considering democracy’s pitiful state worldwide that, in accordance to its etymology, it literally means “common people’s rule” or, more simply, “people’s power.” The English term democracy and the 14th-century French word democratie come from the Greek demokratia via the Latin democratia. The Greek radical demos means “common people,” and kratos means “rule, or power.”

Read the rest

Continue Reading

Connecticut’s Museum of the Occult

If you’ve seen the Hollywood horror films, The Conjuring or Annabelle, then you’re probably aware of Ed and Lorraine Warren. But I’m willing to bet that some, if not most, are generally unfamiliar with their work and past. I’ve been fortunate enough to have met Lorraine Warren a few times (I actually went with her and some neighbors to see The Conjuring when it was released) because my boyfriend’s friend (we’ll call him Jake, for the sake of privacy) lives next door to Lorraine.

Yes, he lives next door to the Museum of the Occult.

(The above video shows a tour of the Museum. The quality is bad, but they tell an interesting story about the Annabelle doll.)

Their website is extremely outdated and hard to read with the black background and flashy graphics, so I’ll copy their bio for you here:

For over fifty years now, Ed and Lorraine Warren have been considered America’s preeminent experts on the subject of spirits and demonology.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Everything You Know Is Wrong. Really.

The disinformation mantra has long been “Everything You Know Is Wrong.” Now a new poll across 14 countries by Ipsos MORI shows that in fact, most people really are wrong about the basic make-up of their populations and the scale of key social issues.

  • Teenage birth rates: on average, people across the 14 countries think that 15% of teenagers aged 15-19 give birth each year. This is 12 times higher than the average official estimate of 1.2% across these countries. People in the US guess at a particularly high rate of teenage births, estimating it at 24% of all girls aged 15-19 when it’s actually 3%. But other countries with very low rates of teenage births are further out proportionally: for example, Germans think that 14% of teenage girls give birth each year when it’s actually only 0.4% (35x the actual figure).
Read the rest
Continue Reading

God Is the Machine

Vancouver Film School (cc by 2.0)

Vancouver Film School (cc by 2.0)

via Wired (from 2002):

“A Mind Bending Meditation on the Transcendent Power of Digital Computation.” By Kevin Kelly

At today’s rates of compression, you could download the entire 3 billion digits of your DNA onto about four CDs. That 3-gigabyte genome sequence represents the prime coding information of a human body — your life as numbers. Biology, that pulsating mass of plant and animal flesh, is conceived by science today as an information process. As computers keep shrinking, we can imagine our complex bodies being numerically condensed to the size of two tiny cells. These micro-memory devices are called the egg and sperm. They are packed with information.

That life might be information, as biologists propose, is far more intuitive than the corresponding idea that hard matter is information as well. When we bang a knee against a table leg, it sure doesn’t feel like we knocked into information.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

New World Disorder: Challenges for the UN in the 21st Century with Kofi Annan

[Editor's note: The video below is not the full speech. The above video also has part of the Q&A, which Luke is a part of.]

This is a speech that Kofi Annan gave in NYC at Baruch college that was titled “New World Disorder.” We couldn’t believe it ourselves so we wanted to post the full video of the former general secretary of the U.N talking openly about the plan for a New World Order.

Via We Are Change

Read the rest

Continue Reading

Terrestrial Energy Co.: Vanquish the Arrested Future of Nuclear Energy

Screen Shot 2014-10-30 at 8.42.00 PM

In a Sept 2014 talk at the Economic Club of Canada, Hugh MacDiarmid coolly lays out the groundwork of a new energy future, without the pie-in-the-sky wishes of fusion, the intermittent inadequacy of solar and wind, or the non-renewable carbon emissions of coal, oil, and gas.

Canadian company Terrestrial Energy is on track to make the first commercially viable molten salt nuclear reactor by early next decade, at first supplementing coal but ultimately supplanting it for electricity production. The molten salt reactor (MSR) is a type of Generation 4 reactor with roots in the 1950s at Oak Ridge National Lab and has manifold advantages over existing reactors. The MSR uses a liquid salt loop to contain its fissile material such as uranium, thorium, or plutonium oxides. Since the reaction occurs in liquid fuel, it is literally impossible to melt down, and since it reacts at atmospheric pressure there is no need for a massive reinforced containment vessel.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

Why Republicans Keep Telling Everyone They’re Not Scientists

Florida Governor Rick Scott 1

Gov. Rick Scott

Hint: “I’m not a scientist” = “I don’t want to talk about that.” Coral Davenport investigates the new Republican mantra for the New York Times:

Gov. Rick Scott of Florida, a Republican who is fighting a Democratic challenge from former Gov. Charlie Crist, was asked by The Miami Herald if he believes climate change is significantly affecting the weather. “Well, I’m not a scientist,” he said.

Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, who is locked in a tight re-election race, was asked this month by The Cincinnati Enquirer if he believes that climate change is a problem. “I’m not a scientist,” he said.

House Speaker John A. Boehner, when asked by reporters if climate change will play a role in the Republican agenda, came up with a now-familiar formulation. “I’m not qualified to debate the science over climate change,” he said.

“I’m not a scientist,” or a close variation, has become the go-to talking point for Republicans questioned about climate change in the 2014 campaigns.

Read the rest
Continue Reading