Am I A Psy-Op & Don’t Even Know It?

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JC Collins writes at philosophyofmetrics:

Since starting this site on New Years Eve, 2013, a mere 14 1/2 months ago, I’ve received some strange and bizarre messages in the comments section.  As I have chosen to moderate the comments, there are many that do not make it to the screen.  There are many reasons for this.

Some are racists, while others are outright criminal.  Occasionally messages from space aliens and planet gods from other dimensions make their way into the pending post section.  Sometimes it’s simply the same old tired rant against Jews.  Considering my wife is half Jewish (the other half is Egyptian, which made for confusing Passover celebrations when she was growing up), I could never take such comments seriously.

Other times people will send me links or copies of something written elsewhere.  Most of these things are derogatory comments about me or the site.  My three sons, who are all young men now, often stumble across things on the internet about me, things like I’m an Illuminati shill, and part of the Collins Illuminati family.  Jeez, I wish.  They call or text me while laughing their heads off at the ridiculousness of it all.

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The Hierarchy of Humanities Schadenfreude

Franz Kafka: Not a job creator

Franz Kafka: Not a job creator

Rebecca Schuman writes at Slate:

Carmen Maria Machado had a writing professor named Harvey Grossinger who changed her life. So profound was his influence that he inspired her to become a writer herself. Her article “O Adjunct! My Adjunct!”, which appeared recently in theNew Yorker, is a testament to Grossinger’s legacy—part living elegy, part call to arms for adjunct professors, in whose ranks he labored, poorly paid, and without benefits or job security. “What I wouldn’t figure out for the better part of [a] decade,” Machado writes, “was that Harvey was an adjunct. He didn’t tell us, and I didn’t know to ask.” She’d never even heard the term adjunct before, which is part of the reason she now finds herself in a similar position, for a similar pittance. “The adjuncts who teach well despite the low pay and the lack of professional support may inspire in their students a similar passion—prompting them to be financially taken advantage of in turn,” she writes.

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Astounded by the Lack of Compassion for Men in Prison: Inside the Conversation at The Good Men Project

jmiller291 (CC BY 2.0)

jmiller291 (CC BY 2.0)

Via the Good Men Project:

Lisa Hickey: I’ve been thinking a lot about prison lately. It’s not something that, as a women, I am used to thinking about a lot, and the number of conversations I’ve had about the topic in my lifetime are far and few between. Perhaps men don’t think or talk about it much either, but we’ve been discussing it a lot on the The Good Men Project lately and I’d like to share with you the complexity of the issues and the insights I’ve seen unfolding.

One thing we’ve discussed recently in an article is the difference in sentencing between men and women for similar crimes. I think the sentencing disparity is part of a cultural narrative that goes like this: Men are assumed to be guilty more often, and they are also assumed to cause more harm when they do commit crimes.

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The NASA Team Keeping Tabs on Intergalactic Death Rays

Intergalactic death rays are just so sexy deadly… BBC Future reports on the NASA team trying to help us avoid gamma ray bursts:

You do not want to get in the way of a gamma ray burst.

Gamma Decay.svg

Illustration of an emission of a gamma ray (γ) from an atomic nucleus

 

“They’re the most luminous, high energy explosions that have happened since the Big Bang,” says Neil Gehrels, principal investigator at Nasa for the Swift mission. “It’s like a beam of gamma radiation that’s flying through the Universe.”

What would happen if one of these cosmic death rays of high frequency electromagnetic waves hit the Earth?

“For a planet 1000 light years away, it would destroy the ozone layer. If it was just 100 light years away it could blow the atmosphere off,” says Gehrels matter-of-factly.

“The chances of that happening to the Earth is fairly small, about once in a billion years,” he adds.

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Robert Jeffress Says 9/11 Was Punishment For Abortion

Dammit… How did we miss that?!

Luke Brinker via Salon:

“All you have to do is look in history to see what God does with a nation that sanctions the killing of its own children,” Jeffress said, speaking at the Jerry Falwell-founded university’s convocation. ”Just look at the nation of Israel … Because they got involved in the worship of Moloch, the pagan god, and they sacrificed their children on the altar, what did God do? He raised up the godless Babylonians and Assyrians to bring judgement on his own people.”

Jeffress continued: ”People ask me all the time, ‘Well, I just don’t understand why God wouldn’t protect our nation and he would allow these radical Muslims in 2001 to kill 3,000 of our citizens and why God doesn’t protect us. Surely, God doesn’t use pagans to bring judgment upon his own people, does he?’”

“Just read the Bible,” he said. “God will not allow sin to go unpunished and he certainly won’t allow the sacrifice of children to go unpunished.”

Read the entire article here.… Read the rest

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This Is Absolutely Terrifying: “There Are Really Only Two Big Patches of Intact Forest Left on Earth”

Alias 0591 (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Alias 0591 (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Lindsay Abrams writes at Salon:

Can a forest that exists only in the spaces between roads and patches cleared for human settlement and agricultural development truly be called a forest?

Not so much, say researchers studying the growing, global problem of forest fragmentation. And the “persistent, deleterious and often unpredicted” consequences of human activity, finds a new study conducted by a team off 24 international scientists, and funded by the National Science Foundation, may be ruinous for plant and animal life.

“There are really only two big patches of intact forest left on Earth — the Amazon and the Congo — and they shine out like eyes from the center of the map,” lead author Nick Haddad, a professor at North Carolina State University, told the New Yorker.

“Nearly 20 percent of the world’s remaining forests are the distance of a football field — or about 100 meters — away from forest edges,” he elaborated in a statement.

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Tackling the ET question: Project Camelot and Robbie Graham

“The Cult of Nick podcast” has been going for a few years now. It launched on Disinfo, in 2012. Back then it contained work taken from my archive. For a few years in the UK, I was fortunate enough to be paid to present a national radio show on the sort of topics that fascinate me: occultism, UFOs, ghosts, bigfoot, conspiracy theories.  The show was called “The Night Before” and ran on a UK station called “Kerrang Radio“. We made the international news after interviewing Edgar Mitchell, he announced UFOs were real and governments were covering it up. The interview itself is not my finest hour, his announcement came at the end of an hour long session where we mainly discussed him going to the moon. I keep shouting “wow, that’s amazing”. It’s my attempt to throttle the mainstream audience and remind them that this is a high caliber witness telling us all something incredible.… Read the rest

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How to Discipline Your Children without Rewards or Punishment

Discipline is necessary for children, but we need to teach them to self-discipline, not bribe them to be good. Emiliano, CC BY-SA

Discipline is necessary for children, but we need to teach them to self-discipline, not bribe them to be good. Emiliano, CC BY-SA

Might parenting be one of the reasons so many people grow up to be obedient worker/consumer/sheeple?  Rebecca English writes at the Conversation.

Rebecca English, Queensland University of Technology

Many parents are moving towards “gentle parenting”, where they choose not to use rewards (sticker charts, lollies, chocolates, TV time as “bribes”) and punishments (taking away “privileges”, time-out, smacking) to encourage good behaviour, but encourage good behaviour for the sake of doing the right thing.

Gentle parents argue that to offer rewards and punishments overrides a child’s natural inclination towards appropriate behaviour by teaching them to behave in certain ways purely to receive a reward, or to avoid punishment.

What is discipline?

For most people it would seem impossible to discipline without rewards and punishments. However, it depends on your understanding of “discipline”.

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