Leave Facebook if you don’t want to be spied on, warns EU

Sean MacEntee (CC BY 2.0)

Sean MacEntee (CC BY 2.0)

Samuel Gibbs Via The Guardian:

The European Commission has warned EU citizens that they should close their Facebook accounts if they want to keep information private from US security services, finding that current Safe Harbour legislation does not protect citizen’s data.

The comments were made by EC attorney Bernhard Schima in a case brought by privacy campaigner Maximilian Schrems, looking at whether the data of EU citizens should be considered safe if sent to the US in a post-Snowden revelation landscape.

“You might consider closing your Facebook account, if you have one,” Schima told attorney general Yves Bot in a hearing of the case at the European court of justice in Luxembourg.

When asked directly, the commission could not confirm to the court that the Safe Harbour rules provide adequate protection of EU citizens’ data as it currently stands.

The US no longer qualifies

The case, dubbed “the Facebook data privacy case”, concerns the current Safe Harbour framework, which covers the transmission of EU citizens’ data across the Atlantic to the US.

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Guerrilla Radio: How some prison inmates hack, rewire, and retool their radios to create walkie-talkies

Take notes from this Marshall Project post: you’ll want to retool your radio too come the Apocalypse:

Prisoners face numerous restrictions when communicating with one another or the outside world. But where there is a rule, there is often a workaround. At Pelican Bay State Prison in Northern California, inmates have yelled to one another through drainpipes under their cells; inmates in Texas talk through cans connected with twine; and in facilities throughout the country, little paper notes — known as “kites” — are literally handed off. As technology has developed, so have the communication methods; cell phones and iPods are regularly smuggled to inmates by visitors and guards. And occasionally, the technology is already inside the prison. Some inmates have learned how to transform their radios into devices that allow them to talk to each other and even eavesdrop on guards.

Radionette kurer transi back.png

Once an inmate has purchased an analog radio from the prison commissary (they usually cost less than $30), he can open it up and pull apart a coil, which changes the range of frequency that the radio can access.

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Do stars have a sound? A new study says they might.

NGC 3603 is a prominent star-forming region in the Carina spiral arm of the Milky Way, about 20,000 light-years away. (NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage/STScI/AURA/ESA-Hubble Collaboration)

NGC 3603 is a prominent star-forming region in the Carina spiral arm of the Milky Way, about 20,000 light-years away. (NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage/STScI/AURA/ESA-Hubble Collaboration)

Rachel Feltman at The Washington Post:

Do stars make noise? More importantly, if a star makes a sound too high for mammals to hear and is also in the vacuum of space where no sound can travel . . . does it even count?

Thank God nothing is resting on humanity answering that, because what even.

In a new study published in Physical Review Letters, researchers present evidence that stars might make a sound (sort of).

[Breathtaking new image captures birth of countless stars]

They were studying plasma, which is the state of matter that makes up most things in the universe (though only visible in a few things, like lightning strikes and the gas inside neon signs, on Earth). Plasma is basically a gas that’s been charged with enough energy to loose electrons from the atoms holding them.

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The Dunning-Kruger Effect

This was originally published on haeugene.tv.

The Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias wherein unskilled individuals suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly assessing their ability to be much higher than is accurate. This bias is attributed to a metacognitive inability of the unskilled to recognize their ineptitude.
(Source)

I’m doing good, thanks for asking.

That? That’s nothing. Yeah, I do that all the time. You think that’s something? You should have seen what I made last Thursday. Hoo boy. That was something.

Conversely, highly skilled individuals tend to underestimate their relative competence, erroneously assuming that tasks which are easy for them are also easy for others.
(Source)

Yeah, I guess you can say they chose me for this project because they didn’t want to mess around. You know what they say – you want something done right…wait, how does that saying go, again?

RMS Titanic (Source)

RMS Titanic (Source)

Oh that?… Read the rest

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The Anatomy of a Trichome

The Anatomy of a Trichome

Sirius J via High Times:

Trichomes, those little tiny crystal-like hairs that cover the buds, hold all the good stuff. The different methods of hashmaking focus on isolating these sticky little parts of the cannabis plant because they house the majority of its resin.

Every part of the cannabis plant has at least a little THC in it. Leaves have around 4%, while buds have up to 25% or 30% of dry weight. The trichomes cover all parts of the buds, from the interior stems to the surrounding leaves.

Scientists used to think that THC and other cannabinoids were made in the green plant tissue and transported out to the trichomes during flowering, but after intensive research, they realized that the trichomes themselves make the cannabinoids and terpenes.

Trichomes might grow off a leaf around the flower of a female plant, or a bract (pictured above).  A bract houses the seeds in a fertilized plant, and has a high density of trichomes.

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The Anti-Conspiracy Theorist

6811188An anti-conspiracy theorist (ACT) is someone who typically holds the belief that every official explanation of a major event is correct and that human beings never collude to bring about negative situations for others or cover up wrongdoings. An ACT is usually someone who feels the need to invent a non-story to explain away the troubling occurrence of understandable and explicable events (one of the most common inventions is that of a group of powerful people called “The Government,” who constantly tell the truth and have no influence on world events).

An ACT may also suffer from psychological defects such as extreme credulity, excessive submission to authority, and an inability to think critically. Instead of looking at events individually and assessing each one on its own merits, an ACT is compelled to make a decision about all of them based on a preconceived notion that everything on the surface is true and nothing else exists.… Read the rest

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Talking Acid, Feminism, and UFOs with Visionary Director Phil Mucci (Plus Torche’s Annihilation Affair Video Debut)

torche_stills11One thing I’m constantly trying to relay about next level communication is that it doesn’t happen with words, but rather through means of subjectively projected telepathic metaphor. In the vast majority of UFO contactee reports, one encounters similar stories about blackened psionic eyes that peer directly into the soul. Eyes that can project and receive pure information. Metaphorically of course, I’d argue that we’re unconsciously engaging in this pursuit with our increasingly art-centric lifestyles. Theses days, half of our experiences involve movies, video games, albums, celebrity sex fantasies, and cutesy kitten GIFS. The reason I’m mentioning this, for probably the bajillionth time, has to do with this interview I just did with the visionary music video director Phil Mucci (who’s films other films you can check out here, or read my top 5 list of here). I honestly knew very little about Phil when I stumbled on his work last fall, but through watching his subversive psychedelic shorts, I realized that I knew far more about him than I initially thought.… Read the rest

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Remove the burden of family violence from the victims, to the courts

Michael D Beckwith (CC BY 2.0)

Michael D Beckwith (CC BY 2.0)

Rob Hulls, RMIT University

Family violence has finally come to attention as a systemic wrong in need of a national plan. A federal Senate Inquiry is examining it in detail and Victoria has appointed a dedicated minister for its prevention and a Royal Commission. The Queensland Special Taskforce has just handed down its comprehensive report, and a family violence prevention advocate, the incredible Rosie Batty, has been named Australian of the Year.

My team at RMIT’s Centre for Innovative Justice released a report today that aims to broaden this conversation. Despite increased awareness, a significant gap exists in our collective response. Yes, we need to support those who are subjected to family violence – mostly women and children – and this must remain our priority. But we must also intervene at the source of the problem.

Until we adjust the lens and bring those who use violence and coercion more clearly into view, victims will remain at risk and the cycle of this violence will simply roll on.… Read the rest

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