Astounded by the Lack of Compassion for Men in Prison: Inside the Conversation at The Good Men Project

jmiller291 (CC BY 2.0)

jmiller291 (CC BY 2.0)

Via the Good Men Project:

Lisa Hickey: I’ve been thinking a lot about prison lately. It’s not something that, as a women, I am used to thinking about a lot, and the number of conversations I’ve had about the topic in my lifetime are far and few between. Perhaps men don’t think or talk about it much either, but we’ve been discussing it a lot on the The Good Men Project lately and I’d like to share with you the complexity of the issues and the insights I’ve seen unfolding.

One thing we’ve discussed recently in an article is the difference in sentencing between men and women for similar crimes. I think the sentencing disparity is part of a cultural narrative that goes like this: Men are assumed to be guilty more often, and they are also assumed to cause more harm when they do commit crimes.

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The NASA Team Keeping Tabs on Intergalactic Death Rays

Intergalactic death rays are just so sexy deadly… BBC Future reports on the NASA team trying to help us avoid gamma ray bursts:

You do not want to get in the way of a gamma ray burst.

Gamma Decay.svg

Illustration of an emission of a gamma ray (γ) from an atomic nucleus

 

“They’re the most luminous, high energy explosions that have happened since the Big Bang,” says Neil Gehrels, principal investigator at Nasa for the Swift mission. “It’s like a beam of gamma radiation that’s flying through the Universe.”

What would happen if one of these cosmic death rays of high frequency electromagnetic waves hit the Earth?

“For a planet 1000 light years away, it would destroy the ozone layer. If it was just 100 light years away it could blow the atmosphere off,” says Gehrels matter-of-factly.

“The chances of that happening to the Earth is fairly small, about once in a billion years,” he adds.

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Robert Jeffress Says 9/11 Was Punishment For Abortion

Dammit… How did we miss that?!

Luke Brinker via Salon:

“All you have to do is look in history to see what God does with a nation that sanctions the killing of its own children,” Jeffress said, speaking at the Jerry Falwell-founded university’s convocation. ”Just look at the nation of Israel … Because they got involved in the worship of Moloch, the pagan god, and they sacrificed their children on the altar, what did God do? He raised up the godless Babylonians and Assyrians to bring judgement on his own people.”

Jeffress continued: ”People ask me all the time, ‘Well, I just don’t understand why God wouldn’t protect our nation and he would allow these radical Muslims in 2001 to kill 3,000 of our citizens and why God doesn’t protect us. Surely, God doesn’t use pagans to bring judgment upon his own people, does he?’”

“Just read the Bible,” he said. “God will not allow sin to go unpunished and he certainly won’t allow the sacrifice of children to go unpunished.”

Read the entire article here.… Read the rest

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This Is Absolutely Terrifying: “There Are Really Only Two Big Patches of Intact Forest Left on Earth”

Alias 0591 (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Alias 0591 (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Lindsay Abrams writes at Salon:

Can a forest that exists only in the spaces between roads and patches cleared for human settlement and agricultural development truly be called a forest?

Not so much, say researchers studying the growing, global problem of forest fragmentation. And the “persistent, deleterious and often unpredicted” consequences of human activity, finds a new study conducted by a team off 24 international scientists, and funded by the National Science Foundation, may be ruinous for plant and animal life.

“There are really only two big patches of intact forest left on Earth — the Amazon and the Congo — and they shine out like eyes from the center of the map,” lead author Nick Haddad, a professor at North Carolina State University, told the New Yorker.

“Nearly 20 percent of the world’s remaining forests are the distance of a football field — or about 100 meters — away from forest edges,” he elaborated in a statement.

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Tackling the ET question: Project Camelot and Robbie Graham

“The Cult of Nick podcast” has been going for a few years now. It launched on Disinfo, in 2012. Back then it contained work taken from my archive. For a few years in the UK, I was fortunate enough to be paid to present a national radio show on the sort of topics that fascinate me: occultism, UFOs, ghosts, bigfoot, conspiracy theories.  The show was called “The Night Before” and ran on a UK station called “Kerrang Radio“. We made the international news after interviewing Edgar Mitchell, he announced UFOs were real and governments were covering it up. The interview itself is not my finest hour, his announcement came at the end of an hour long session where we mainly discussed him going to the moon. I keep shouting “wow, that’s amazing”. It’s my attempt to throttle the mainstream audience and remind them that this is a high caliber witness telling us all something incredible.… Read the rest

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How to Discipline Your Children without Rewards or Punishment

Discipline is necessary for children, but we need to teach them to self-discipline, not bribe them to be good. Emiliano, CC BY-SA

Discipline is necessary for children, but we need to teach them to self-discipline, not bribe them to be good. Emiliano, CC BY-SA

Might parenting be one of the reasons so many people grow up to be obedient worker/consumer/sheeple?  Rebecca English writes at the Conversation.

Rebecca English, Queensland University of Technology

Many parents are moving towards “gentle parenting”, where they choose not to use rewards (sticker charts, lollies, chocolates, TV time as “bribes”) and punishments (taking away “privileges”, time-out, smacking) to encourage good behaviour, but encourage good behaviour for the sake of doing the right thing.

Gentle parents argue that to offer rewards and punishments overrides a child’s natural inclination towards appropriate behaviour by teaching them to behave in certain ways purely to receive a reward, or to avoid punishment.

What is discipline?

For most people it would seem impossible to discipline without rewards and punishments. However, it depends on your understanding of “discipline”.

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Venezuelan Model Wears Corset 23 Hours a Day for Extreme Hourglass Figure

Surreal…

Sumitra via Oddity Central:

In a bid to achieve a tiny waist, 25-year-old Aleira Avendano has been wearing a tight corset 23 hours a day, for the past six years. The result? She literally looks like an hourglass, with 34DD breasts, an enlarged derriere, and a shockingly slim 20-inch waist.

Aleira said that she began ‘waist’ training as a teenager. Her skinny core now attracts attention wherever she goes. “People stop what they’re doing and stare – everywhere I go I get attention,” she said. “People shout at me in the street – they can’t believe that figure is real.”

She does admit that wearing a corset was uncomfortable at first and it took her some time to get used to. But over time she got so used to it that her skin would start to itch when she took it off. And she says that she actually loves wearing it now.

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Anglo-Saxon antibiotics are just the start – it’s time to start bioprospecting in the past

That old Anglo-Saxon remedy reported yesterday has got people “bioprospecting” the past according to the Guardian:

Bioprospecting – the search for new drugs and commercial products from the natural world – is big business, and has recently turned towards the search for new antibiotics. The collaboration at the University of Nottingham between a microbiologist and an Anglo-Saxon scholar may show the way for a new kind of bioprospecting, one that looks to the past, rather than the present, for future therapies and cures.

Svømmende blodigle.JPG

Leech. Photo by Karl Ragnar Gjertsen (CC)

 

Antibiotics: hidden cures

I’ve already posted my historical hints for discovering a new antibiotic, but perhaps we’d have developed one sooner if twentieth century historians paid more attention to past publications. From the 1870s onwards a series of scientists noted that Penicillium fungus seemed to inhibit the growth of bacteria, and in 1875 John Tyndall presented evidence to the Royal Society that the Penicilliumfungus had an antibacterial action.

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