Transcendental Meditation in schools, the David Lynch program

Douglas Mesner reports on Examiner.com:

Expel from your mind the stereotyped image of the robed, bearded yogi.  Forget the worn image of the unkempt, hash-headed, lotus-seated hippy listening to sitar music in an incense-filled room behind a beaded curtain.  This is not the Transcendental Meditation [TM] we are talking about.  This is Science!

“Hundreds of scientific studies have been conducted on the benefits of the Transcendental Meditation program at more than 200 independent universities and research institutions worldwide in the past 35 years,” explains the TM-promoting David Lynch Foundation for Consciousness-Based Education and World Peace website.  Among the positive side-effects of the TM program, we find: increased focus, decreased hostility, reduced anxiety, even a reduction in cardiovascular disease among practitioners.

Surely, with this in mind, no reasonable person would argue against teaching the TM method in public schools.

And this is exactly what the David Lynch Foundation – founded by the cult film director of Twin Peaks, Blue Velvet, and Mulholland Driveproposes: implementation of a TM teaching program “in public and private schools and in after-school programs across the U.S. and around the world, with thousands of students enjoying its benefits.”

This past April, the foundation held a large benefit concert in New York – including performances by Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, Ben Harper, and Moby – which, according to USA Today, raised an estimated $3 million toward funding the TM-in-schools program.

But, despite the attributed benefits and celebrity endorsements, some worry that the teaching of a TM-based program in public schools constitutes another breach across the ever-eroding church-state dividing line …

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  • Anonymous

    laughingcrowspeaks: are you saying there’s misinformation in the article? Do tell. Is it a “misinterpretation” that TM promises “supernormal powers” or the The Secret-style idiocy of “the Maharishi Effect”? It would seem a belief in such BS requires a good deal of faith. Do you dispute the author’s assertion of a lack of comparative analysis studies amongst the TM research? Really, you don’t dispute the article with any counter-arguments at all but to pop on and say it’s a “negative mindset misinterpreting everything”. Be nice if you at least let us all what was misinterpreted and what the misinformation is.

  • laughingcrowspeaks

    ah, people who worry about TM in the schools, RELAX! there are a few folks who get hysterical and get all witch-hunty over TM, claiming it's a religion or something weird and spreading misinformation on the Internet. but that's just their negative mindset misinterpreting everything. TM is great, wonderful, and natural.

    TM is not a religion and requires no faith, and people of all religions do it.

  • akuma_khan

    laughingcrowspeaks: are you saying there's misinformation in the article? Do tell. Is it a “misinterpretation” that TM promises “supernormal powers” or the The Secret-style idiocy of “the Maharishi Effect”? It would seem a belief in such BS requires a good deal of faith. Do you dispute the author's assertion of a lack of comparative analysis studies amongst the TM research? Really, you don't dispute the article with any counter-arguments at all but to pop on and say it's a “negative mindset misinterpreting everything”. Be nice if you at least let us all what was misinterpreted and what the misinformation is.

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