Children Under 7 Scour The Web For Porn

From CNN:

Yikes. According to Symantec, the fourth most popular search term for children 7 and under is “porn” – just ahead of kids’ networking site Club Penguin.

Symantec recently released the anonymous results of 14.7 million searches run by users of its OnlineFamily.Norton service in 2009. The service allows parents to monitor web activities and supposedly blocks questionable sites, so let’s hope the toddlers searching for “porn” were unsuccessful.

It’s understandable that “sex” is one of the top searches for teens, but I was surprised to see that children as young as 7 were familiar with “porn.” While services like OnlineFamily.Norton may filter most inappropriate content, they are not perfect – and are no substitute for parental supervision…

[continues at CNN]

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  • D351

    Sounds to me like the auto-fill feature was on and “porn” had probably been searched by dad earlier on the same computer… Or one of a million other consistent reasons that these stats would be unfeasible to realistically obtain/analyze, better yet verify. This might also have something to do with new fathers having a higher tendency to look for porn.

  • welli

    voodookhan@hotmail.de I think, this is not good, thank you

  • GoodDoktorBad

    We found dads playboys or scoured National Geographic for bare boobs.
    At 7, we were so curious but didn't know why. Liking the opposite sex was still an embarrassment if revealed to anyone. Curiousity explored in secret, hiding from everybody and terribly afraid of getting caught. We learn our taboos at an early age, things that stick with us through life.
    Much of our “kinky-ness”, preferences and attitudes are based on these personal, early experiences with sex.
    The song: “Pictures of Lily” by “The Who” is a relevent commentary on the subject.

  • emperorreagan

    I saw my first pornography around 6 or 7, when another boy stole one of his dad's Playboys and brought it to school. I also saw some Tijuana Bible-esque stuff around the same time period. It seems reasonable to me that other kids might be the same, only now they catch on to what their parents are doing with the internet.

    I also think it's interesting that younger kids search for “porn,” but as they approach the teen years it switches to “sex.” That's a flip from curiosity about something they might catch glimpses of when their parents are online to becoming curious about the mechanics of the act, which also makes sense to me.

  • crabmonster

    Stories like this are put out to convince you that it's okay for the government to restrict web access.

    this is from Australia:

    http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/mandatory-cens

    Canada will be next, the US will get it soon.

  • mindskru

    so YouTube is #1 AND #8 for 13-18, #1, #6 AND #7 for 8-12, and #1 AND #8 for under 7?!?!?! I will NOT take this seriously if those are the “results” for their “research”. Idiots.

    • emperorreagan

      Different permutations of “YouTube.” I don't think that's surprising at all, especially with more people using Google to direct them everyplace instead of typing URLs in directly.

  • http://www.Gangstalkingworld.com/ gangstalking

    I notice that the 8-12 are not searching for porn. These statistics do not make sense. Are we truly to believe that 7 and under search for porn actively, but that after age 8-12 they stop searching, and then start up again in the 13 plus? There is no consistency with this pattern and so it suggests very strongly that there is some other factor ongoing here.

  • http://www.Gangstalkingworld.com/ gangstalking

    I notice that the 8-12 are not searching for porn. These statistics do not make sense. Are we truly to believe that 7 and under search for porn actively, but that after age 8-12 they stop searching, and then start up again in the 13 plus? There is no consistency with this pattern and so it suggests very strongly that there is some other factor ongoing here.