Flush It All Away

The Flush

The Flush

‘The problem of pollution has to a certain extent crept up on us while we sleep-walked, being that most historical waste was readily degraded by nature, unfortunately modern pollutions are not always so easily disposed of. In the last hundred years or so, with advancements in science and technology, we have seen the appearance of plastics and other petrochemical derivatives, complex novel chemistries previously unknown to the biosphere. Some of these chemistries have been released into the ecosystem of Earth with very little cognisance of their consequence, caution was not erred. The environment however is not a laboratory and unexpected or unintended consequences are still consequences. Some familiar examples include PCB’s and DDT and the endocrine disruptors of more recent renown.’

Original Article at Decontaminated Continuum

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3 Responses to Flush It All Away

  1. emperorreagan December 2, 2009 at 8:36 pm #

    I know where to start on getting in touch with nature again and giving up excess – instead of insisting on our houses and offices be kept at a constant 70 degrees F, we could try opening windows.

  2. Word Eater December 3, 2009 at 10:49 pm #

    My neighborhood’s recycling program is ridiculously simple to use. You are given blue bags (on demand, at least once a year). Put stuff in those bags and it will be manually sorted for recycling. Put regular garbage in your regular bags. You throw them in the same bin and they are picked up by the same trucks at the same time.

    In a typical week, we’ll go through one or two regular garbage bags and four to six recyclable material bags (if you count newspaper, cardboard, and shredded paper).

    It saves the city money because they don’t have to spend as much to dump it in a landfill and they can sell the recyclable materials for cash money.

    If more towns would implement things like that *and* make an effort to educate inhabitants on just how easy it is, we could do some good without having to change our habits very much. And for Americans, if it isn’t convenient, it won’t happen.

    Total win, win.

  3. Word Eater December 3, 2009 at 6:49 pm #

    My neighborhood's recycling program is ridiculously simple to use. You are given blue bags (on demand, at least once a year). Put stuff in those bags and it will be manually sorted for recycling. Put regular garbage in your regular bags. You throw them in the same bin and they are picked up by the same trucks at the same time.

    In a typical week, we'll go through one or two regular garbage bags and four to six recyclable material bags (if you count newspaper, cardboard, and shredded paper).

    It saves the city money because they don't have to spend as much to dump it in a landfill and they can sell the recyclable materials for cash money.

    If more towns would implement things like that *and* make an effort to educate inhabitants on just how easy it is, we could do some good without having to change our habits very much. And for Americans, if it isn't convenient, it won't happen.

    Total win, win.

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