Is Durango Group Evidence of an Evil Military-Industrial Complex?

logo_durangoUSAToday asks some pertinent questions about the fuzzy line separating government and corporations in the military-industrial complex:

In a marketplace awash in consulting firms that help defense companies sell to the Pentagon, the Durango Group has a unique advantage.

The Colorado-based firm has become a base of operations for retired officers who also are handsomely paid by the military for their advice. No other defense consulting firm employs more “senior mentors” than Durango. Of the 59 former officers who work for Durango, 15 also serve as mentors, a USA TODAY investigation found.

As Durango associates, the retired officers are paid to help private companies win and administer Pentagon contracts. As mentors, the retirees are paid by the military to help run war games, which also gives them access to classified strategies and weapons systems. Durango cites these mentoring assignments on its website as signs of its associates’ unique connections.

Along with their work for Durango and the military, these retired officers, mostly from the Air Force, are paid advisers, consultants and corporate directors on the boards of at least 20 companies, according to public records. Three of them work for private equity firms to help them identify, buy and then run defense contractors.

Durango’s ability to mix mentoring and consulting work illustrates how closely the private interests of some mentors overlap with their military advisory jobs. The firms’ mentors move seamlessly between roles as paid advisers to the services and paid consultants to defense companies in the same subject areas, USA TODAY found.

As a result, Durango and the mentors it employs draw income from multiple sources. Both get paid by the military for advice and by defense contractors who want consulting help. The firm also benefits from having its mentors serve as corporate directors or advisers for other companies.

That kind of overlap is not illegal. But some analysts say it should be…

[continues at USAToday]

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  • Anonymous

    there should NEVER be any incentive for men to kill each other. making war a profitable ‘business’ is the very definition of evil. men who justify murdering men, women, and children so they can enjoy first class upgrades on their travel and lodging? so they may summer in the Hamptons and winter in the south of Florida? Is that humanity at it’s best? can we even call what we are a civilization if we are not civil to anyone who does not impress us with their wealth? Who are we? what does our society stand for? we stand against many things, but what do we stand for? this system of constant war against everything is insane…or is it just me?

  • bigncornfed

    there should NEVER be any incentive for men to kill each other. making war a profitable ‘business’ is the very definition of evil. men who justify murdering men, women, and children so they can enjoy first class upgrades on their travel and lodging? so they may summer in the Hamptons and winter in the south of Florida? Is that humanity at it’s best? can we even call what we are a civilization if we are not civil to anyone who does not impress us with their wealth? Who are we? what does our society stand for? we stand against many things, but what do we stand for? this system of constant war against everything is insane…or is it just me?

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