A Political History Of Streaking

Streaking and Politics in the Post-Vietnam Era make be the best-researched analysis ever done on public nudity. The surprise argument is that streaking was a form of conservative protest:

Though late May 1974, a wave of “streaking”—occurred in the United States, primarily on college and university campuses [and] eventually spread around the world. Streaking generated significant press coverage and spawned a plethora of streaker-related consumer items including coffee mugs, t-shirts, “Keep On Streaking” patches…and two dozen novelty singles (one of which, Ray Stevens’ “The Streak,” became a major hit).

Streakers themselves reterritorialized the physical campus, cloaking themselves in nostalgia and a discourse of apolitical “student-ness” in order to deploy an assertive semiotics of white masculinity in the face of threats to white male hegemony within the university setting…

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  • http://drewt333.blogspot.com/ drewt333

    “in order to deploy an assertive semiotics of white masculinity in the face of threats to white male hegemony”

    What a complete load of pretentious bullshit.

  • rebecca1958

    @drewt333: The whole article is pretty readable actually–there's some academic jargon in there, but that's how they write. As for bullshit? I don't think so. When George Will and WF Buckley agree that streaking is good, maybe there's something to the claim that it was conservative, at least at that time. Streaking probably means something different today than it did in the 70s, of course.

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