Scientist Says We Should Search For Aliens Here On Earth

alienThe Telegraph reports that the search for alien life forms should be conducted here on Earth rather than in outer space, according to a leading scientist:

Professor Paul Davies, a physicist at Arizona University will tell a meeting at the Royal Society that the best way of proving that extra-terrestrial life exists elsewhere in the universe is to use evidence from earth. The meeting at the Royal Society, which will include representatives from Nasa, the European Space Agency and the UN Office for Outer space Affairs marks the 5th anniversary of the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) programme. Lord Rees, President of the Royal Society will also lead one of the sessions.

Prof Davies said: We need to give up the notion that ET is sending us some sort of customised message and take a new approach.”

He suggested that the search could focus on deserts, volcanic vents, salt-saturated lakes and the dry valleys of Antarctica – places where ordinary life struggles to survive – to find “weird” microbes that belong to a “shadow biosphere”.

Felissa Wolfe-Simon, from the US Geological Survey, is currently looking at the possibility that arsenic, found in contaminated places such as the Mono Lake in California, might support forms of life in the same way as other life forms use phosphorous…

[continues in the Telegraph]

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  • http://www.leifjones.com/ Leif Jones

    If it's from Earth it's not extra-terrestrial. Am I missing something?

    • http://www.xenex.org/ xen

      No, you really aren't. And we are well aware of extremophiles already, so isn't this just needlessly sexy-ing up further searches for these?

      Also, the steroid Gray has got to go. I know it is on Wikipedia, but it makes the concept of these creatures more ridiculous then it needs to be.

    • GoodDoktorBad

      Consider this, the Earth we live on is essentialy a space ship, its guided and powered by the sun. The earth itself is also an old piece of the sun or other star matter. The earth is moving through space very rapidly. As sci-fi as it may sound, we are riding on starship earth.
      With this in mind, it stands to reason that we might pick up something interesting along the way of “alien” origin as we orbit the sun, which in turn orbits the galactic center (the theoretical big bang blast zone).
      “Alien” -meaning anything else in the universe not recently of this earth that may give us some indication of life from another place, intelligent or otherwise.

  • http://www.myspace.com/thanaton John Gillanders

    Another example of Science with it's head way up it's ass. Yeah, clearly all reports of UFO's, Alien Abductions, crop circles, impossible ancient architecture, cave paintings/other alien themes in ancient art, and the similarites between abductee reports and shamanistic initiation rites are all TOTAL BULLSHIT. Clearly. Nothing to them at all. Nothing whatseover. Humans really need to start waging a war agains their own egos and recognize that what bugs them the most about all of these phenemenon is the idea that we can understand more about our own spirituality than we do and that this is a necessity (does anyone reading this even know that the idea of much broader spiritual multiverse rather than materialistic one is lurking at the heart of all alien phenomenon?) Also, the idea that we are not the highest from of civilization in the universe is something mainstream science will never fully be able to handle. Oh, the arrogance. I do agree though, SETI is totally worthless.

    • Word Eater

      I take issue with your assumption that the only reason humans don't search for extra-terrestrial intelligent life is because we “arrogantly” think we are the “highest from [sic] of civilization”.

      That has nothing to do with it. And the fact that intelligent life may exist out there isn't the problem either.

      The problem is that the universe is really big, like huge. And it's old, too. Older than the oldest mountains, older than your grand-dad, older than the Sun.

      If there is intelligent life at this moment somewhere else in the Universe, it is very likely that it is much too far away to ever communicate with us or reach us.

      Even if we pointed every single one of our telescopes at exactly the right spot, we'd still only see what a planet was like thousands or millions of years ago.

      There may be intelligent life out there, but it doesn't matter. Looking for it by sending out radio waves in random directions in the sky is about as useful as looking for a marble someone dropped in the ocean 35 years ago with a pair of goggles.

  • 5by5

    Why don't they just ask the cows?

    Aliens love the cow lips.

    I'm certain the cows have much to tell us.

  • Anonymous

    Consider this, the Earth we live on is essentialy a space ship, its guided and powered by the sun. The earth itself is also an old piece of the sun or other star matter. The earth is moving through space very rapidly. As sci-fi as it may sound, we are riding on starship earth.
    With this in mind, it stands to reason that we might pick up something interesting along the way of “alien” origin as we orbit the sun, which in turn orbits the galactic center (the theoretical big bang blast zone).
    “Alien” -meaning anything else in the universe not recently of this earth that may give us some indication of life from another place, intelligent or otherwise.
    I also agree with John Gillanders in that its arrogant to think that our quite possibly narrow standards of intelligence should be assumed as the galactic standard.

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