Resilient Communities with Jeremy O’Leary

Jeremy O'Leary

Photo by Audrey Eschright / CC

Via Technoccult:

What can individuals do to improve their community’s resilience — whether that be in Portland or elsewhere?

I would suggest one of the 1st steps is to re-enforce the school buildings to withstand an earthquake, use the food certified kitchens in the schools to process locally grown food, and store emergency provisions at the schools.

If you mount solar PV panels on the roofs and place HAM radios there you can be fairly sure of having islands of communication even if things go really sideways.

You would need to have rain water cisterns at the schools, which could also be used for the urban orchards and the veggie gardens.

More broadly speaking, knowing your neighbors and being on good terms with them is possibly the 1st thing to do. It’s only then that conversations about sharing resources can be possible.

It sounds like you’ve picked schools as the epicenter for resilience in communities. Why?

At least in the case of Portland, they are arranged so there is usually a school within a 1/2 mile of you at any point in town. Community centers, churches, a mall…. these would of course work as well.

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2 Responses to Resilient Communities with Jeremy O’Leary

  1. Anonymous April 2, 2010 at 7:30 pm #

    People talk an awful lot about community but very few actually DO anything to promote an all around good community, when I hear someone talk about community it sounds to me like code for, “Make our neighborhood safe for white people.”

    I like what this guy is trying to do, we could definitely use more people like him in the world, gardening and other forms of self-sufficiency need to be taught in our schools, not the blind consumerism promoted by soda and snack machines that litter the cafeteria. If he is not careful, though, he will wind up being accused of being a Communist, a word, which shockingly, no one seems to see the correlation to the word “community”. Community gardens should be a central focus of any public works committee that has money to spare. Teach the children to take care of themselves early, and teach them to take care of each other and this world might actually work out for us. Unless you are too busy trying to shove your processed corn products down their throats in order to meet your quarterly projections.

  2. tonyviner April 2, 2010 at 2:30 pm #

    People talk an awful lot about community but very few actually DO anything to promote an all around good community, when I hear someone talk about community it sounds to me like code for, “Make our neighborhood safe for white people.”

    I like what this guy is trying to do, we could definitely use more people like him in the world, gardening and other forms of self-sufficiency need to be taught in our schools, not the blind consumerism promoted by soda and snack machines that litter the cafeteria. If he is not careful, though, he will wind up being accused of being a Communist, a word, which shockingly, no one seems to see the correlation to the word “community”. Community gardens should be a central focus of any public works committee that has money to spare. Teach the children to take care of themselves early, and teach them to take care of each other and this world might actually work out for us. Unless you are too busy trying to shove your processed corn products down their throats in order to meet your quarterly projections.

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