William Gibson Reveals His Favorite Science Fiction

William Gibson's new novel, <a href=William Gibson, generally credited as one of the progenitors of the cyberpunk genre of sci fi (Neuromancer being one of the seminal novels in the genre), has given New York Magazine a list of his favorite science fiction novels:

Tiger! Tiger! (1956)
By Alfred Bester

It’s also known as The Stars My Destination. My favorite literary expression of mid-century Manhattan, and I doubt I’d have written without having read it.

Dhalgren (1975)
By Samuel R. Delany

It won’t work unless you can allow it to become your head for a few weeks; it helps if you’re rather young. Closest thing I know to a great “sixties” novel.

Arslan (1976)
By M. J. Engh

A very different sort of alien invasion: America as Earth. One of the best works of science fiction you probably haven’t heard of.

The Crystal World (1966)
By J. G. Ballard

It’s hard to pick just one Ballard, but you could certainly start with this.

The Forever War (1974)

By Joe Haldeman

The most adult and intelligent novel of military science fiction.

Pavane (1968)
By Keith Roberts

The Roman Catholic Church still rules England in 1968, Protestantism having been destroyed in the wake of the 1588 assassination of Queen Elizabeth…

[continues in New York Magazine]

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  • All_Day_SCI-fi

    Check out The Brain (1948) by Heinrich Hauser.

    It is very interesting in comparison to Neuromancer (1984).

    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/32498/32498-h/32498-h.htm

    The movie GOG (1954) was largely derived from it. It isn’t bad for a 1954 sci-fi movie. Better acting would have helped a lot though.

    Gibson doesn’t like Asimov, Heinlein or Clarke.

  • All_Day_SCI-fi

    Check out The Brain (1948) by Heinrich Hauser.

    It is very interesting in comparison to Neuromancer (1984).

    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/32498/32498-h/32

    The movie GOG (1954) was largely derived from it. It isn't bad for a 1954 sci-fi movie. Better acting would have helped a lot though.

    Gibson doesn't like Asimov, Heinlein or Clarke.

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