Bilderberg 2010: Between The Sword And The Wall

The Catalan police are refreshingly friendly. But if the time for action comes, the Guardian‘s Charlie Skelton asks whose side will they be on:

The enormous bald detective in beach shorts took the camera from my wife. “Let me see.” He scrolled through the photographs, just taken, of me being detained at the campsite gates. He scrolled past, to see a photo of a limousine convoy, whooshing up the hill to Bilderberg. “I don’t like this,” he said, and waved a huge, disgruntled hand towards the conference hotel.

Map of countries by the number of politicians, which have attended one or more conferences organized by the Bilderberg Group.

Map of countries by the number of politicians, which have attended one or more conferences organized by the Bilderberg Group.

“Do you know how much this is costing?” asked Hannah. “Do you think the Spanish economy can afford all this?” Grimly, the enormous bald detective started deleting images of his comrades with his giant thumb. “Your opinion,” he growled, “is right.”

He handed the camera back to Hannah. “But you’ve deleted my best shots!” The detective whistled to his comrades, who were busy sniffing a jar of salted olives they had found in my car boot. He had them turn around, facing away from the camera. “Go head,” he rumbled. “Take photographs.”

What a difference a year makes. Last year in Vouliagmeni when I tried covering the 2009 Bilderberg meeting, I had Greek policemen yelling “No fotografia!” at me at every turn. I was arrested, tailed, harassed, rearrested, yelled at, bundled into squad cars, lied to, intimidated, wrestled with and hounded round Athens like I was John Dillinger.

This year, the police have been deployed in the same extraordinary numbers, but they are smiling, rolling their eyes at the rigmarole; the riot police are giving the thumbs-up to protesters and honking their horns as they come round the “awareness roundabout” at the foot of the hotel.

“The police have been laughing and chatting,” says Daniel Turon, a Spanish psycho-sociologist, here in Sitges to psycho-sociologise Bilderberg. “One of them said he had read a book about Bilderberg; another said, ‘Yes, we understand.'” The Catalan police, he says, “have a different sensibility” from what you may expect. “They are Catalan. Their minds are independent.”…

[continues in the Guardian]

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  • E. Spengler

    The Guardian reporting on the Bilderberg is pure disnformation. It pretends to be edgy by reporting from Sitges, the town where it takes place. But all we get is endless descriptions of the police: what they wear, how they behave, what questions they ask, etc. Virtually no relevant information is given on who is participating in the conference itself (apart from one or two less important names) and the topics discussed. This information can be readily found with a few minutes Internet search, and yet the Guardian pretends this information is really impossible to obtain.

    Worse still, those who tried to post relevant Bilderberg information in the comment section of the Guardian's articles were heavily censored. It's an effing joke.

    • E.B. Wolf

      “This information can be readily found with a few minutes Internet search,”-any tips to speed that up?

    • Dre9000

      good point. i wonder why disinfo hasnt post a real bilderberg story

  • Dre9000

    good point. i wonder why disinfo hasnt post a real bilderberg story

  • Dre9000

    good point. i wonder why disinfo hasnt post a real bilderberg story

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