Soviet Sci-Fi Animation Of The 1980s

Rhizome.org has a collection of animated adaptations of sci-fi stories produced in the Soviet Union. Apparently studios in the USSR churned out these eerily films, based on stories by American authors such as Stephen King and Ray Bradbury, throughout the 1980s. Bradbury’s “Here There Be Tygers” works perfectly as a fable warning of the destructiveness of evil capitalist greed.

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  • E.B. Wolf

    It sort of reminds me of Andrei Tarkovsky's film, Solaris.

  • Cerebralcaustic

    What a shock: Communists blatantly stole the intellectual work of capitalists.

    incidentally, I doubt that JacobSloan has ever read “Here There Be Tygers.” The story's about the all-too-real tendency of humans to exploit and ruin. People were effing up the world long before capitalism was invented … and Communists have done more than their share of ruining the world and exploiting its resources.

    • baph777

      Actually, the world didn't really start getting effed up (environmentally) until the time of the industrial revolution which was largely spurred by Capitalism while pure Communism as envisioned by Marx and Engels a form of government has never been implemented as a form of government and pure socialism has very rarely been implemented as a form of government by any nation.

      My former college philosophy professor used to say that the ideal form of American government as envisioned by the American Founding Fathers was much closer to true Communism as conceptualized by Marx and Engels than Russian or Chinese Communism due to their dictatorial natures ever were.

    • milk-eyed mender

      Oh my. Low marks for you, Cerebral. 1. Ray Bradbury was not a “capitalist”. 2. Capitalism is inherently connected to exploitation of natural resources due to its overpowering need for growth and constantly increased consumption – an economic requirement, and, funnily enough, only a part of “human nature” in certain types of societies. USSR did exploit resources, though, you are correct about that. They took many features of capitalism and reassembled them to try to make a functioning whole; ergo they also had many of the flaws of capitalism as well as some new ones. Lazy thinking doesn't get you anywhere, I guess.

  • dumbsaint

    These are awesome, nice find.

  • malatesting123

    Cool watch. Really neat video, not what I might have expected.

  • ES

    Might I suggest you look at Kin Dza Dza — it's cult Russian sci-fi comedy from the 80's. You can watch it on youtube:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_jZ8HVkm4s

    To learn more about it, see the following wikipedia page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kin_dza_dza

  • milk-eyed mender

    Oh my. Low marks for you, Cerebral. 1. Ray Bradbury was not a “capitalist”. 2. Capitalism is inherently connected to exploitation of natural resources due to its overpowering need for growth and constantly increased consumption – an economic requirement, and, funnily enough, only a part of “human nature” in certain types of societies. USSR did exploit resources, though, you are correct about that. They took many features of capitalism and reassembled them to try to make a functioning whole; ergo they also had many of the flaws of capitalism as well as some new ones. Lazy thinking doesn’t get you anywhere, I guess.

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