The Crusextraction of the Earth

Robert Singer writes:

During the various stages of the energy extraction process, the globe of the earth suffers limitless pain at the area where the drilling occurs. It is gradually being depressurized and cooled internally, causing cycles of constriction, joint-rending cramps, intermittent partial asphyxiation and searing pain as they use large drills to puncture pericardium and into the heart, sometimes as deep as 10,000 feet.

As the serum gets sucked from the sediment pores, the surrounding rocks shift positions to fill the newly vacated spaces, causing unbearable agony as the earth automatically contracts in size and goes badly out of shape resulting in a deep crushing pain.

“I Thirst.” “My strength is dried up like a potsherd; my tongue cleaveth to my jaws; and thou hast brought me into the dust of death.”(Psalm 22:15)

Then another agony begins when millions of barrels of vital bodily fluids are produced. This causes deep, crushing pain as the sac surrounding the bowels of the earth slowly fills with hydrocarbon soil and begins to compress the tectonic plates causing (shock) mini-seismic earthquakes.

“I am poured out like water, and all my bones are out of joint, my heart is like wax; it is melted in the midst of my bowels.” Psalm 22:14

When the loss of fluids reaches a critical level, the earth is struggling to pump heavy, thick, sluggish serum that is not only pressurized, but is also hot. As it is extracted, the tortured lungs of the earth are suffocating and are making a frantic effort to inhale small gulps of air.

The pressure gradually decreases, making it less profitable to take the remaining serum, but to make doubly sure of a mortal wound, the legionnaire uses external-energy to pierce and inject cold water into the sac surrounding the heart.

“They shall look on Him whom they pierced.” Psalm 22:16,17

“And immediately there came out blood and water.” John 19:34

On June 15, 2010, Barack Obama addresses the nation on the Crusextraction of the earth.

“The millions of gallons of oil that have spilled into the Gulf of Mexico are more like an epidemic, one that we will be fighting for months and even years.

But make no mistake: we will fight this spill with everything we’ve got for as long it takes.

Tonight I’d like to lay out for you what our battle plan is going forward: what we’re doing to clean up the oil, what we’re doing to help our neighbors in the Gulf, and what we’re doing to make sure that a catastrophe like this never happens again.”

Capture, clean up, help our neighbors…but to stop the 60,000 barrels of fluids being poured out every day is not a priority because the legionnaire wants the spill to go on for months and even years.

“They shall look on Him whom they pierced”

A legionnaire does not give aid and cap the wounds of his enemy. He watches as the fluids are poured out in the water.

The worst environmental disaster in our history and the 2008 Financial Collapse are related.

Steven Kopits, managing director of Douglas-Westwood, notes the US oil demand in a mild recession declines about 3%.

“In the current recession, oil demand briefly dropped nearly 3 mbpd from its peak, about half of which occurred in September 2008 in the aftermath of the collapse of financial markets following the bankruptcy of the investment bank Lehman Brothers.

If we allow that this will be a severe – but not catastrophic – recession, then a drop of 7%, or 1.5 mbpd of US consumption from peak to trough, is entirely possible.” Recession & Oil Demand by Steven Kopits

Current estimates of the BP oil Crusextraction (spill) are an insignificant 35,000 – 60,000 barrels per day.

Steven estimates that the earth is “benefiting” from the 2008 recession at the rate of 1,500,000 barrels per day!

An explosion on an oil-drilling rig off the coast of southeast Louisiana did not reveal a heretofore undiscovered vulnerability in the earth’s crust.

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Read An Ominous Drilling Sign for the Truth and find out why the legionnaires are pursuing a strategy in Chess known as “perpetual check.”

Robert Singer writes about Secrets, Sentient Creatures and The Federal Reserve at the The Peoples Voice and The Market Oracle.

Find Robert Singer on Twitter.

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  • Decorator

    what?

    • Cerebralcaustic

      In certain leftist circles, it's become fashionable to apply the Marxist Dialectic to environmentalism.

      Rather than the evil capitalists exploiting the working class as in traditional Marxism, it's now proposed that humans are pure evil for exploiting the environment.

      The fallacy of this philosophy, however, is that humans are *part of the environment.* Humans CAN NOT be regarded as distinct from the environment in which we live, because like all animals we evolved in the environment and use the environment. Birds build nests; humans build 2500 square-foot split-level condos. Beavers build wooden dams, humans build hydroelectric dams. The only difference is that of scale.

      This bizarre post goes a step beyond the Marxist Dialectic and proposes that the Earth is Christ, and we evil humans are persecutors. Or some damned thing…

      • http://www.thecarnivalnoir.com Haystack

        Singer's post is flaky as Hell, but that aside…

        The Marxist objection would be better characterized as a critique of the market for viewing the environment *only* in economic terms. So for example, the market would find nothing objectionable about cutting down an old growth forest to produce toilet paper, if the forest cannot justify itself in economic terms by supporting, say, a tourist industry. Or in that same calculus, a health insurance company would find no value in continuing to support a terminally ill customer, and would try to find ways to cut its losses.

        Some application of governmental power is demanded to prevent the market from reducing everything to a commodity.

  • Anon

    Nonsensical ramblings. Waste of time. Shallow attempt at sounding deep.

  • Snark

    lol

  • Alech

    Please pretend that this post is a picture of Jean-Luc Picard in his famous “facepalm” pose.

  • http://www.thecarnivalnoir.com Haystack

    Singer’s post is flaky as Hell, but that aside…

    The Marxist objection would be better characterized as a critique of the market for viewing the environment *only* in economic terms. So for example, the market would find nothing objectionable about cutting down an old growth forest to produce toilet paper, if the forest cannot justify itself in economic terms by supporting, say, a tourist industry. Or in that same calculus, a health insurance company would find no value in continuing to support a terminally ill customer, and would try to find ways to cut its losses.

    Some application of governmental power is demanded to prevent the market from reducing everything to a commodity.

  • Cerebralcaustic

    In certain leftist circles, it's become fashionable to apply the Marxist Dialectic to environmentalism.

    Rather than the evil capitalists exploiting the working class as in traditional Marxism, it's now proposed that humans are pure evil for exploiting the environment.

    The fallacy of this philosophy, however, is that humans are *part of the environment.* Humans CAN NOT be regarded as distinct from the environment in which we live, because like all animals we evolved in the environment and use the environment. Birds build nests; humans build 2500 square-foot split-level condos. Beavers build wooden dams, humans build hydroelectric dams. The only difference is that of scale.

    This bizarre post goes a step beyond the Marxist Dialectic and proposes that the Earth is Christ, and we evil humans are persecutors. Or some damned thing…

  • http://www.thecarnivalnoir.com Haystack

    Singer's post is flaky as Hell, but that aside…

    The Marxist objection would be better characterized as a critique of the market for viewing the environment *only* in economic terms. So for example, the market would find nothing objectionable about cutting down an old growth forest to produce toilet paper, if the forest cannot justify itself in economic terms by supporting, say, a tourist industry. Or in that same calculus, a health insurance company would find no value in continuing to support a terminally ill customer, and would try to find ways to cut its losses.

    Some application of governmental power is demanded to prevent the market from reducing everything to a commodity.

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