The Occult World of C.G. Jung

C. G. Jung in 1910.

C. G. Jung in 1910.

Via the Fortean Times:

He knew that inside the temple the mystery of his existence, of his purpose in life, would be answered. He was about to cross the threshold when he saw, rising up from Europe far below, the image of his doctor in the archetypal form of the King of Kos, the island site of the temple of Asclepius, Greek god of medicine. He told Jung that his departure was premature; many were demanding his return and he, the King, was there to ferry him back. When Jung heard this, he was immensely disappointed, and almost immediately the vision ended. He experienced the reluctance to live that many who have been ‘brought back’ encounter, but what troubled him most was seeing his doctor in his archetypal form. He knew this meant that the physician had sacrificed his own life to save Jung’s. On 4 April 1944 — a date numerologists can delight in — Jung sat up in bed for the first time since his heart attack. On the same day, his doctor came down with septicæmia and took to his bed. He never left it, and died a few days later.

Read More: Fortean Times

, , , , , ,

21
More in C. G. Jung, Death, Mythology, Occult, Psychology, Red Book
Mythical Unicorn or Mutated Deer? (Video)

From Discovery News: Legend met reality recently as Italian researchers discovered a deer with a rare abnormality — a single antler growing from the middle of its head. Rossell Lorenzi...

Close