Kepler Discovers Two Saturn-Sized Exo-Planets

Artist concept of Kepler 9b & 9c

Artist concept of Kepler 9b & 9c

The more objects we discover in space, the more we discover just how small we are. From BBC:

The US space agency’s Kepler planet-hunter has spied a star that has two Saturn-sized objects circling it.

Astronomers say they cannot be sure just yet but there may be a third, more Earth-sized planet present as well.

Follow-up studies were now trying to confirm this suspicion, Matthew Holman and colleagues told Science magazine.

The Kepler telescope was launched last year to identify planets by looking for periodic dips in light as objects pass in front of stars. It is equipped with the largest camera ever put in space.

The mission has so far amassed hundreds of these transit events but definitive statements about the discovery of new planets beyond our Solar System – so-called exoplanets – can only be made after many careful repeat observations.

The two Saturn-sized objects announced through the journal’s online publication tool, Science Express, are the result of seven months of detailed analysis.

Continues at BBC News

9 Comments on "Kepler Discovers Two Saturn-Sized Exo-Planets"

  1. Vox Cloaca | Aug 27, 2010 at 8:35 am |

    “The more objects we discover in space, the more awesome humanity becomes for expanding our collective knowledge.”

    Fixed the headline.

  2. How soon before we discover a Dyson Sphere?

  3. How soon before we discover a Dyson Sphere?

    • I think the writers on Star Trek: TNG have told us : ) but I agree with the author of the post, the universe appears to be wide open as far as human interests are concerned.

  4. I think the writers on Star Trek: TNG have told us : ) but I agree with the author of the post, the universe appears to be wide open as far as human interests are concerned.

  5. As far as they are away….so what.

  6. As far as they are away….so what.

    • They are far away now, but with the right technology, they could become very close.

  7. They are far away now, but with the right technology, they could become very close.

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