The Highest Paid Authors of 2010

Dan who? James Patterson is king when it comes to making money from writing books (although I’m not sure he actually writes that much himself — a New York Times Magazine profile earlier this year says “with the help of his stable of co-authors, he published nine original hardcover books in 2009 and will publish at least nine more in 2010,” implying that most of the work is done by the co-authors). From Forbes:

Publishers are feeling the heat, with hardcover sales weak and the rise of e-books promising to upend their business models. But the world’s 10 top-earning authors are making out just fine, earning a combined $270 million over the 12 months to June 1.

James Patterson’s $70 million in earnings vaults him to No. 1 on our list, up from second place two years ago. The prolific thriller writer’s latest deal, signed last fall, involves penning a carpal tunnel-risking 17 books by the end of 2012 for an estimated $100 million.

Patterson’s literary empire includes television, comic book and gaming deals. His foreign sales alone bring in well over $10 million a year. Patterson’s e-books are posting respectable numbers, too. I, Alex Cross alone has sold 160,000 units digitally. Ironic, given that there’s no computer in his home office–Patterson writes all his novels in longhand. To date he has published 51 New York Times best sellers.

Vampire romance author Stephenie Meyer ranks second this year. Her Twilight series has become such a juggernaut that despite not releasing a new title in 2009, she earned $40 million over the year. About $7 million of that came from movies adapted from the Twilight series. In June the third Twilight installment pulled in $175 million in its first six days, the most successful first week of any movie of 2010.

The bad climate for brick and mortar bookselling hasn’t hurt prolific horror maven Stephen King, either, who placed third on our list with a take of $34 million…

[continues at Forbes]

, ,

  • Ruth Walker

    James Patterson “was” a great writer and even some of those he “wrote with” have fair plots but the writing mill he now has should not be considered his legacy. It should be a separate category and though the money it generates still goes mostly in his pocket, it should not be credited to his authorship but divided among his
    stable writers for statistical lists such as this. Ruth Stockstill Walker, Picayune, Ms.

  • Ruth Walker

    James Patterson “was” a great writer and even some of those he “wrote with” have fair plots but the writing mill he now has should not be considered his legacy. It should be a separate category and though the money it generates still goes mostly in his pocket, it should not be credited to his authorship but divided among his
    stable writers for statistical lists such as this. Ruth Stockstill Walker, Picayune, Ms.

21
More in Book Publishing, Books
Will Amazon Push Ads into eBooks?

A book editor at Houghton Mifflin argues ebook advertising is "coming soon to a book near you." Report in the Wall Street Journal: Amazon has filed a patent for advertisements...

Close