France Bans Burqas

I suppose it’s somewhat comforting to know that the United States is not the only country with xenophobic pastors and politicians who want to burn Korans, or in the case of France, ban women from wearing burqas (those head-veils) in public — but it’s not exactly going to make life any easier for the French, who have already seen a threat to the Eiffel Tower as a result!

majestic

Majestic is gadfly emeritus.

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19 Comments on "France Bans Burqas"

  1. Far as I’m aware, Burqa’s are already banned in Canada, with the arguments that you can hide weapons under them, hide drugs, smuggle terrorists, do human trafficking, etc…

  2. Far as I’m aware, Burqa’s are already banned in Canada, with the arguments that you can hide weapons under them, hide drugs, smuggle terrorists, do human trafficking, etc…

  3. Vox Penii | Sep 15, 2010 at 1:05 pm |

    Majestic thinks it’s good when the French stand up for their cultural integrity by opposing McDonalds:

    http://disinfo.com/2010/08/asterix-french-comics-hero-endorses-mcdonalds/

    But Majestic thinks its “xenophobic” when the French stand up for their cultural integrity by opposing burqas.

    Why is one good, and the other bad?

    According to Victimhood Poker (a satirical version of the real-life admission policy at many American universities), Muslims are worth more points than white people …. http://dicklist.blogspot.com/2006/07/tdl-gaming-world-series-of-victimhood.html

  4. Anonymous | Sep 15, 2010 at 1:56 pm |

    no. i’m canadian and there are no rules about that…

  5. You’re right. They’re both bad and should both be banned.

  6. Ironaddict06 | Sep 15, 2010 at 3:23 pm |

    This will never happen in America. As long as you are a minority in America, you can claim it’s against your civil rights and un-constitutional.

  7. Ironaddict06 | Sep 15, 2010 at 11:23 am |

    This will never happen in America. As long as you are a minority in America, you can claim it’s against your civil rights and un-constitutional.

  8. gemmarama | Sep 15, 2010 at 5:30 pm |

    yup, at risk of calling down all manner of controversy i must agree. i’m all for religious tolerance but this is a cultural issue; it’s merely a tradition, in the manner of foot-binding. i respect people’s beliefs up unto the point where they disrespect my entire gender by suggesting that the mere sight of us is so disturbing and offensive that we should go about our daily business wearing masks. i quite like the feel of the sun on my face, thanks.

  9. Anonymous | Sep 15, 2010 at 9:06 pm |

    Burqas are banned but Hijabs are still allowed. A burqa is the fill body covering except for the eyes not just the head veil which is known as a hijab. Both burqa and hijab are both mostly cultural and were not even used much until the 1950s when the saudis pushed a more restricting version of islam. I am for Frances right to ban the public wearing of something that has been used to commit a crime in cases. We here in the us have many local ordinances not allowing you to wear a mask or hoodie covering the face.

  10. hunter349 | Sep 15, 2010 at 5:06 pm |

    Burqas are banned but Hijabs are still allowed. A burqa is the fill body covering except for the eyes not just the head veil which is known as a hijab. Both burqa and hijab are both mostly cultural and were not even used much until the 1950s when the saudis pushed a more restricting version of islam. I am for Frances right to ban the public wearing of something that has been used to commit a crime in cases. We here in the us have many local ordinances not allowing you to wear a mask or hoodie covering the face.

    • It bans the Niqāb, the head veil which forms part of the Hijab (conservative clothing rules). So it targets full face covering clothing, depending upon how it is worded ski masks would also likely get picked up in the legislation.
      People have to the right to be able to identify persons they are dealing with in direct personal contact. Obviously many institution have the responsibility to ensure people identify themselves including and especially schools and, obviously banks need identify people withdrawing money and anyone who accepts a credit is responsible for ensuring the person who presented it the authorised holder of the card.

  11. In the province of Quebec it is restricted for any government employee or anyone dealing in governement services from wearing a burqa or hijab.

    http://www.torontosun.com/news/columnists/peter_worthington/2010/03/29/13400986.html

  12. Anonymous | Sep 17, 2010 at 7:07 am |

    It bans the Niqāb, the head veil which forms part of the Hijab (conservative clothing rules). So it targets full face covering clothing, depending upon how it is worded ski masks would also likely get picked up in the legislation.
    People have to the right to be able to identify persons they are dealing with in direct personal contact. Obviously many institution have the responsibility to ensure people identify themselves including and especially schools and, obviously banks need identify people withdrawing money and anyone who accepts a credit is responsible for ensuring the person who presented it the authorised holder of the card.

  13. Ironaddict06 | Sep 18, 2010 at 8:54 pm |

    I agree.

  14. Ironaddict06 | Sep 18, 2010 at 4:54 pm |

    I agree.

  15. Anonymous | Sep 24, 2010 at 3:54 pm |

    sounds like Quebec…

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