Study Shows Audio Records of U.S. History Fading Fast

With all the new technology it is easy to record and document almost anything. A recent study shows that keeping it, however, is a bit harder. From Daily Mail:

New digital recordings of events in U.S. history and early radio shows are at risk of being lost much faster than older ones on tape and many are already gone, according to a study on sound released Wednesday.

Even recent history — such as recordings from 9/11 or the 2008 election — is at risk because digital sound files can be corrupted and widely used CD-R discs last only last three to five years before files start to fade, said study co-author Sam Brylawski.

“I think we’re assuming that if it’s on the Web it’s going to be there forever,” he said. “That’s one of the biggest challenges.”

The first comprehensive study of the preservation of sound recordings in the U.S. being released by the Library of Congress also found many historical recordings already have been lost or can’t be accessed by the public. That includes most of radio’s first decade from 1925 to 1935.

[continues at Daily Mail]

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  • William Xavier McGarley

    Well about time! And good riddance, too! I’d always cringe when I’d hear them old wax cylinders of the great heros of Capitalism like Thomas Edison and John D. Rockefeller screeching away in a register more appropriate for Vatican City castrati than Ayn Rand’s wet dreams.

    This is the perfect opportunity to have all related film footage overdubbed with deep, manly voices like James Earl Jones or Daryl White (i.e., son of Barry).

  • William Xavier McGarley

    Well about time! And good riddance, too! I’d always cringe when I’d hear them old wax cylinders of the great heros of Capitalism like Thomas Edison and John D. Rockefeller screeching away in a register more appropriate for Vatican City castrati than Ayn Rand’s wet dreams.

    This is the perfect opportunity to have all related film footage overdubbed with deep, manly voices like James Earl Jones or Daryl White (i.e., son of Barry).

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