Why Christwire Rocks

cwirelogoDepending on your religious beliefs and affiliations, you may or may not be aware of the megapopular Christwire. The New York Times explains why it’s such a joke:

Since 2008, Christwire.org has emerged as the leading Internet sites for ultraconservative Christian news, commentary and weather reportage. “Hurricane Earl Projected Path, Gay East Coast of America,” Christwire opined last Monday. One headline in late August proclaimed, “Warning! Black Music Infiltrates the Minds of Future Homemaking White Women.” Last week, referring to Ken Mehlman, the former Republican Party chairman who came out of the closet last month, Christwire asked, “Why does Ken Mehlman think that choosing the homosexual lifestyle is more important to him than the Republican values he once held so dear?”

Christwire has lately reached new levels of popularity, in part thanks to an Aug. 14 column, “Is My Husband Gay?” Written by Stephenson Billings, the piece is a 15-point checklist to help wives diagnose possibly closeted husbands. “Gym membership but no interest in sports” is one warning sign. So is “Sassy, sarcastic and ironic around his friends” and “Love of pop culture.” “Is My Husband Gay?” was picked up on The Huffington Post and mentioned by Ryan Seacrest on his radio show; so far it has been viewed 8.3 million times.

Oh, by the way: Christwire is all one big joke.

Not the readership — which hit a high of 27 million page views in August — but the content, the opinions and the fake authors who write the stuff. (There is no “Stephenson Billings.”) Neither of the two founders is a conservative Christian. They are just like-minded 28-year-olds who met on the Internet, have never seen each other in person, and until this week had never given their real identities to a reporter…

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  • Hadrian999

    great, you broke it

  • Anonymous

    I looked at the site and my eyes are now bleeding. At first I thought it was a “The Onion” style take on religion. But “Oh My -insert your diety here-“, the articles are real and about as bizarre as I’ve ever seen. Beware!

    • Anonymous

      NOT…

    • justagirl

      i looked at your meme and thought you were “happy jesus in pink tinted glasses”.

  • http://voxmagi-necessarywords.blogspot.com/ VoxMagi

    I have to wonder how many Xians have blindly worshiped this sight and applauded the accuracy of its insights regarding orthodox views of life politics and whatever else becomes a topic. Probably about as many as there repubs who think Colbert is deadly serious and isn’t mocking the living hell out of them.

    • A Bad Joke

      Remember when Colbert got invited to one of Bush’s press dinners?

  • Haystack

    I hadn’t heard of this, but I’ve never doubted that something like this could work after learning how various pieces by The Onion were being circulated around churches as fact. It’s generally a very bad sign when a group is so far gone that they cannot recognize when they are the objects of satire. Most likely, with readers learn that this site is fake, they just shrug and say that the articles are basically true, even though the writers don’t believe what they’re saying. They’re, you know, the unwitting instruments of God’s wisdom or something.

  • Anonymous

    The very existence of a site like this demonstrates the level of ignorance and plain stupidity in America. This is why the country has become a theocracy and the laughing-stock of the civilized world. It is also why, even as an American, I will never even visit there again, much less live in the land of the unenlightened.

  • D.A.

    I think that this, while being hilarious, is probably going to do more harm than good. Its this sort of thing that’ll give fundamentalist Christians the idea that their beliefs are somehow valid and justified, simply on the basis that there are so many other like-minded crazy people. Being ironic for the sake of irony is probably not a good thing here.

  • Anonymous

    I’d never heard of this site, I’ve stumbled across a site for the landover baptist church once and me and my friends thought that it was this kind of a wind up site. I’m not sure if it is though to be honest.
    It has crazy stuff like this on it.
    “We have a permanent injunction against all unsaved persons. If you are unsaved, you are not allowed within a 10-mile radius of our church, nor are you allowed on this website. Kindly leave, and be about the Devil’s business, for you are not welcome here. Glory!”
    There’s even a link to the injuction google CAUSE NO. 98-10829 and it should pop up. Seems crazy to me.

    • Gramalkin

      Landover Baptist is a well-known parody site. Unfortunately, it falls victim’s to Poe’s Law: “Without a winking smiley or other blatant display of humor, it is impossible to create a parody of Fundamentalism that SOMEONE won’t mistake for the real thing.”
      This is because, sadly, there are fundamentalists who are even crazier than the parodies. See Kent Hovind, the recent plague of geocentrists, etc.

  • Gramalkin

    Landover Baptist is a well-known parody site. Unfortunately, it falls victim’s to Poe’s Law: “Without a winking smiley or other blatant display of humor, it is impossible to create a parody of Fundamentalism that SOMEONE won’t mistake for the real thing.”
    This is because, sadly, there are fundamentalists who are even crazier than the parodies. See Kent Hovind, the recent plague of geocentrists, etc.

  • BVBTOMBVB

    still pretty pissed off about both articles about black veil brides tho tbh

  • BVBTOMBVB

    still pretty pissed off about both articles about black veil brides tho tbh

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