Has Apple Killed the CD?

iTunes RedesignI thought the changing of the iTunes graphic to a CD-less one for iTunes 10 was an interesting symbolic gesture, but looks like Apple is taking it a step further with the MacBook Air, which many agree is the future of their laptop/netbook line. I realize many non-Apple netbooks have done this for a while, so the difference here is that Apple with the introduction of the Mac App Store is further reducing the need for CDs to install programs (i.e. Apps in Apple-speak). (And in all fairness for alternatives to our electronic overlord Steve Jobs, this TechCrunch article states Google and Mozilla are working on similar e-Store concepts.)

I, for one, am welcoming this electronic future free of physical containers to transport information. MG Siegler writes on TechCrunch:

Stop. Take a deep breath. Before my headline ["Yep, Apple Killed The CD Today"] gets you all worked up, consider what I’m saying here. The CD and other optical discs, like DVDs and Blu-rays, are obviously going to live on for a while as a way to transport media. But make no mistake that today, with two unveilings, Apple has effectively sealed the fate of the optical disc in the computer industry. Soon, it will go the way of the floppy disk.

Last week, I wrote a post laying out what I hoped Apple would bring with a revamped MacBook Air. I came to the realization that I had never once used the optical drive in my current MacBook Pro, and it was simply taking up a lot of space and was making my computer unnecessarily bulky. I wanted to replace it with a MacBook Air. And now I can. And I’m not going to be the only one that does.

Now, I know what you’re thinking: but the MacBook Air has been around for a couple of years and it hasn’t killed off the optical disc yet. That’s true, but a couple key ingredients were missing the last time around.

Read More on TechCrunch

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  • http://www.tsheets.com Time Tracking

    Quite frankly, I don’t even see the need for optical discs, even as transport method, any longer. With the OS now tied to a stick, I’d even venture to say that within the next 5-7 years, we’ll see a massive decrease in bluray players, etc, in favor of a DRM copy protected, non writeable stick.

  • http://www.tsheets.com Time Tracking

    Quite frankly, I don’t even see the need for optical discs, even as transport method, any longer. With the OS now tied to a stick, I’d even venture to say that within the next 5-7 years, we’ll see a massive decrease in bluray players, etc, in favor of a DRM copy protected, non writeable stick.

  • http://www.tsheets.com Time Tracking

    Quite frankly, I don’t even see the need for optical discs, even as transport method, any longer. With the OS now tied to a stick, I’d even venture to say that within the next 5-7 years, we’ll see a massive decrease in bluray players, etc, in favor of a DRM copy protected, non writeable stick.