New Scientist Uses Neuromarketing To Increase Sales

Dr. A. K. Pradeep, Chief Executive Officer of NeuroFocus, has written previously about techniques for corporations to appeal to the consumer’s subconscious. Now he writes of a practical application of his neuromarketing techniques by New Scientist magazine, at the Nielsen Blog:

Every new product launch, ad campaign or package design takes significant research, time and resources to ensure success, but not every launch is successful. Suffice it to say that guess work plays a part to determine: Will it grab attention? Will it be memorable? Will it engage emotionally? And most importantly, will it drive purchase intent?

Taking the guess work out of the equation prior to launch is a marketer’s dream, which is now a definable reality with quantifiable results. Just recently the notion was put to the test to see if neuroscience could be used to help a magazine sell more copies. And the results were enlightening.

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Clever Covers
In a publishing industry’s first, New Scientist Magazine approached NeuroFocus to test three different cover designs for an August issue of the magazine using neuromarketing. Applying high density arrays of electroencephalographic (EEG) sensors to capture test subjects’ subconscious responses to the three covers, NeuroFocus identified one as clearly superior in terms of its overall neurological effectiveness.

By monitoring brainwave activity across the full brain as subjects viewed the covers, and using eye-tracking technology to identify which specific parts of the cover they were looking at, NeuroFocus was able to measure their immediate, subconscious reaction to the designs…

[continues at the Nielsen Blog]

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  • gemmarama

    i’d like more detail as to what aspects of this were attributable to “neuroscience.”

    to me, the first cover is simply the better, clearer, more balanced design. also how the hell do they know unless they ran all three covers at once (which they apparently didn’t)?

    • Haystack

      Nothing, really. They just used an EEG to test how people react to the design. It’s just a gimmicky version of focus grouping.

  • gemmarama

    i’d like more detail as to what aspects of this were attributable to “neuroscience.”

    to me, the first cover is simply the better, clearer, more balanced design. also how the hell do they know unless they ran all three covers at once (which they apparently didn’t)?

  • William Xavier McGarley

    I don’t even know what that shit is they’re advertising and I wanna buy it! Sign me up for twenty of what-ever-they-are!!!

  • William Xavier McGarley

    I don’t even know what that shit is they’re advertising and I wanna buy it! Sign me up for twenty of what-ever-they-are!!!

  • Haystack

    The article doesn’t say that New Scientist sold all three versions, and that the one NeuroFocus picked outperformed the others. It says that they used NeuroFocus to pick their cover design, and that issue of the magazine did unusually well. So, in a singe trial there was correlation, but not necessarily causation–the story itself might have been what sold the magazine that month.

    #1 wasn’t really a better design in my opinion–it’s flat and stock photo-y–but it has the more sensational headline of the three.

    • http://profiles.yahoo.com/u/2ZJNVBSQJGXD26JLR3FUARYMMA Joseph

      I agree – I have the magazine and seeing this now I’d have been much more attracted to either of the other two covers.

  • Haystack

    The article doesn’t say that New Scientist sold all three versions, and that the one NeuroFocus picked outperformed the others. It says that they used NeuroFocus to pick their cover design, and that issue of the magazine did unusually well. So, in a singe trial there was correlation, but not necessarily causation–the story itself might have been what sold the magazine that month.

    #1 wasn’t really a better design in my opinion–it’s flat and stock photo-y–but it has the more sensational headline of the three.

  • Haystack

    Nothing, really. They just used an EEG to test how people react to the design. It’s just a gimmicky version of focus grouping.

  • http://profiles.yahoo.com/u/2ZJNVBSQJGXD26JLR3FUARYMMA Joseph

    I agree – I have the magazine and seeing this now I’d have been much more attracted to either of the other two covers.

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