Sculptures Made Of Recycled Human Blood

1996A recycling website asks, “Is using human blood for a sculpture the ultimate in recycling or is it going too far?” That’s actually only the beginning of the questions I would have regarding the behavior of British artist Marc Quinn. Two decades ago, he discovered that human blood is a high-quality sculpting material, and since has been taking large quantities from his body and using it to create self-replicas:

Marc Quinn created his first self-portrait in 1991 when he was only 27 years old. Over the course of almost a year, he drew 4.5 liters (9.5 pints) of his own blood and used it to create a sculpture of his head. The blood needs to be frozen, otherwise the sculpture will melt. The bold statement behind the sculpture — namely that any material can be used — catapulted Quinn to art world stardom in the early ’90s and he became a representative of the Brit Art movement.

The 2006 “Self” (below) was purchased by the U.K.’s National Portrait Gallery for more than $465,000 (£300,000). Gallery director Sandy Nairne said, “Quinn’s ‘Self’ is an outstanding acquisition — a major icon of contemporary British art, both startling and revealing.”

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  • Blahawdawd

    Doesn’t look like a sculpture so much as a mold.

    Creepy, but not exactly requiring amazing talent.

  • Blahawdawd

    Doesn’t look like a sculpture so much as a mold.

    Creepy, but not exactly requiring amazing talent.

    • Scarab

      That’s the beauty of “art.” You don’t really need artistic talent, but rather the creativity to think of absurd things such as this. Sure, it is an interesting idea, but I certainly don’t believe it should be worth that sort of money.

  • Scarab

    That’s the beauty of “art.” You don’t really need artistic talent, but rather the creativity to think of absurd things such as this. Sure, it is an interesting idea, but I certainly don’t believe it should be worth that sort of money.