Early Warning System For Asteroid Attack

Impact eventOne of the more credible of the various 2012 “end is nigh” scares is the prospect of a massive “Near Earth Object” (NEO), most likely a meteor or asteroid, smashing through the Earth’s atmosphere, causing damage locally on impact and potentially causing such great meteorological disruption that our way of life is changed forever, possibly to an extinction level. Frighteningly there is usually hardly any warning that they are coming. MIT’s Technology Review reports on an astronomer’s plans for a network of telescopes that could give up to three weeks’ warning of a city-destroying impact, on its Physics arXiv Blog:

At about 3am on 8 October last year, an asteroid the size of a small house smashed into the Earth’s atmosphere over an isolated part of Indonesia. The asteroid disintegrated in the atmosphere causing a 50 kiloton explosion, about four times the size of the atomic bomb used to destroy Hiroshima. The blast was picked up by several infrasound stations used by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization to monitor nuclear tests.

No-one was injured in blast but the incident highlights the threat that planet faces from near Earth asteroids. Astronomers expect a strike like this once every 2-12 years. And the US congress has given NASA the task of sweeping the skies to identify anything heading our way. So far NASA has looked for objects of a kilometre or more in size and determined that none of these is on track to hit Earth in the foreseeable future.

But what of smaller objects? Various estimates show that an impact with an asteroid just 50 metres across would cause some 30,000 deaths (compared with 50 million deaths from an impact with a 1 kilometre-sized object).

This raises two important questions. The first is how best can astronomers monitor the skies for these smaller objects. The second is what to do should we find something heading our way.

Today, John Tonry from the University of Hawaii gives us his view. He believes the goal of finding 90 per cent of city-destroying asteroids in time to deflect them is extremely challenging. He says a more realistic target is to evacuate the area under threat. And for that we’ll need just three week’s notice.

Given these constraints, he reckons he can do the job with an array of eight 25cm aperture telescopes with a wide field of view that simultaneously scan the visible sky twice a night. He calls this early warning system the Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System or ATLAS…

[continues at Technology Review]

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  • Hadrian999

    so if we had warning, what the hell could we do about it?

  • Hadrian999

    so if we had warning, what the hell could we do about it?

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_PUCZEZLKENE2TWJOYEWEBOO7ZE Jees Lin
  • Namelesswon

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  • Namelesswon

    Ive seeen this film, it’s shit.

  • Siminatongue

    Asteroid attack?! Clearly the person who wrote this headline is a pro-planet hack. Asteroid attack indeed! Asteroids have been passing quietly through the universe since time immemorial. Then suddenly a planet happens along grabbing the asteroid from it’s journey, uses its greater gravitational pull to violently pull the asteroid into it. Smashing the asteroid into itself and obliterating it. And then these hacks have the temerity to say it is the asteroid who is attacking? Disingenuous to say the least.

    I officially protest to this headline and I am forming the coalition A-FEARING. Association For Equal Asteroid Representation In Media Groups.

  • Siminatongue

    Asteroid attack?! Clearly the person who wrote this headline is a pro-planet hack. Asteroid attack indeed! Asteroids have been passing quietly through the universe since time immemorial. Then suddenly a planet happens along grabbing the asteroid from it’s journey, uses its greater gravitational pull to violently pull the asteroid into it. Smashing the asteroid into itself and obliterating it. And then these hacks have the temerity to say it is the asteroid who is attacking? Disingenuous to say the least.

    I officially protest to this headline and I am forming the coalition A-FEARING. Association For Equal Asteroid Representation In Media Groups.

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