How To Israel-ify America’s Airport Security

c1a61f52fdee1e3e142f9c0130e7_grandeSecurity screening at North American airports is inconvenient and invasive, yet at times seems as if it’s all for show. How could it be done better? In Israel, they examine behavior rather than shoes or crotches. The Toronto Star enlightens us:

While North America’s airports groan under the weight of another sea-change in security protocols, one word keeps popping out of the mouths of experts: Israelification.

That is, how can we make our airports more like Israel’s, which deal with far greater terror threat with far less inconvenience. Despite facing dozens of potential threats each day, the security set-up at Israel’s largest hub, Tel Aviv’s Ben Gurion Airport, has not been breached since 2002. How do they manage that?

The first layer of actual security that greets travellers at Tel Aviv’s Ben Gurion International Airport is a roadside check. All drivers are stopped and asked two questions: How are you? Where are you coming from?

“Two benign questions. The questions aren’t important. The way people act when they answer them is.”

Armed guards outside the terminal are trained to observe passengers as they move toward the doors, again looking for odd behaviour. At Ben Gurion’s half-dozen entrances, another layer of security are watching. At this point, some travellers will be randomly taken aside, and their person and their luggage run through a magnometer.

You are now in the terminal. As you approach your airline check-in desk, a trained interviewer takes your passport and ticket. They ask a series of questions: Who packed your luggage? Has it left your side?

“The whole time, they are looking into your eyes — which is very embarrassing. But this is one of the ways they figure out if you are suspicious or not. It takes 20, 25 seconds.”

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  • Harry Tuttle

    Of course this would require them to hire, train, and pay the staff as if they actually were security professionals.

  • Harry Tuttle

    Of course this would require them to hire, train, and pay the staff as if they actually were security professionals.

  • Hadrian999

    the key to the article is “americans don’t trust anybody” which is true,
    our defense forces, police and other agencies have been shown to be totally corrupt or incompetent again and again, i don’t see how we can believe anything they tell us, which is a big problem I see no remedy for.

  • Hadrian999

    the key to the article is “americans don’t trust anybody” which is true,
    our defense forces, police and other agencies have been shown to be totally corrupt or incompetent again and again, i don’t see how we can believe anything they tell us, which is a big problem I see no remedy for.

  • Synapse

    Israel is successful with terror prevention because the individuals are well trained, the security is effective, the threat is real, and the people involved are competent to begin with. The TSA agents are complete morons who can barely be trusted to wave a wand at you without refusing you passage even if you pose absolutely no threat (like if you’re 3 and the body scanner keeps beeping on you), they know the security is a joke and they have stopped 0 terrorists from their policies.

  • Synapse

    Israel is successful with terror prevention because the individuals are well trained, the security is effective, the threat is real, and the people involved are competent to begin with. The TSA agents are complete morons who can barely be trusted to wave a wand at you without refusing you passage even if you pose absolutely no threat (like if you’re 3 and the body scanner keeps beeping on you), they know the security is a joke and they have stopped 0 terrorists from their policies.

  • Marklar_Prime

    Security is not the point. The hassle is the point, or rather the indoctrination to complacent acquiescence to authority. Stand up, sit down, present your crotch for groping, good boy, here’s a biscuit.

  • http://twitter.com/Marklar_Prime Marklar Kronkite

    Security is not the point. The hassle is the point, or rather the indoctrination to complacent acquiescence to authority. Stand up, sit down, present your crotch for groping, good boy, here’s a biscuit.

  • Ironaddict06

    Why are the airline companies not using trained dogs to help detect contraband? Yes TSA is a joke. For the most part, they are glorified security guards.

  • Ironaddict06

    Why are the airline companies not using trained dogs to help detect contraband? Yes TSA is a joke. For the most part, they are glorified security guards.

  • Bob

    The best security is not invade other people’s countries and steal their land as Israel and the US does. Until then, no amount of security theater is going to stop people from wanting to be free from such foreign oppression.

  • Bob

    The best security is not invade other people’s countries and steal their land as Israel and the US does. Until then, no amount of security theater is going to stop people from wanting to be free from such foreign oppression.

    • Laws456

      You said it. Everything else short of changing American foreign policy will guarantee that people will continue to try to hurt Americans by any means necessary.

    • Get It Right

      Yup bub – but somehow you forget to include Russia, Japan, China, Germany, Iraq, Iran in your list of invaders stealing other people’s countries -wonder why?

    • Mikeshatara

      you are 100 percent right

  • Anonymous

    You said it. Everything else short of changing American foreign policy will guarantee that people will continue to try to hurt Americans by any means necessary.

  • Get It Right

    Yup bub – but somehow you forget to include Russia, Japan, China, Germany, Iraq, Iran in your list of invaders stealing other people’s countries -wonder why?

  • Drbob7227

    The whole problem is that all this inconvenience is done on purpose to make the American people feel subserviant and to belittle them into believing they are not to be trusted and therefore the government has to protect them against themselves.
    It is a simple power game that the government is playing to steal more of the rights of the people.
    To do this they must convince the people there is a imminent threat that they must be protected from ( a terrorist under every rock).Unfortunaely, they use underpaid, undertrained lowlifes that are not screened and include child molesters ,sexual predators as well as psycopaths that get off on demoralizing the people. This is their power trip.
    Bottom line, this will continue as long as we let them,it will stop when we make them.
    The people ultimately have the power to decide their future not the governement and certainly not the TSA.Maybe a few days with no passengers coming to the airports will solve the problem.
    If it not stopped now, it will get much worse.

  • Drbob7227

    The whole problem is that all this inconvenience is done on purpose to make the American people feel subserviant and to belittle them into believing they are not to be trusted and therefore the government has to protect them against themselves.
    It is a simple power game that the government is playing to steal more of the rights of the people.
    To do this they must convince the people there is a imminent threat that they must be protected from ( a terrorist under every rock).Unfortunaely, they use underpaid, undertrained lowlifes that are not screened and include child molesters ,sexual predators as well as psycopaths that get off on demoralizing the people. This is their power trip.
    Bottom line, this will continue as long as we let them,it will stop when we make them.
    The people ultimately have the power to decide their future not the governement and certainly not the TSA.Maybe a few days with no passengers coming to the airports will solve the problem.
    If it not stopped now, it will get much worse.

  • Mikeshatara

    you are 100 percent right

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