China Bans English Words In Media

English words and abbreviations are making the Chinese language “impure” and concerns are raised of it’s “adverse social impacts,” according to China’s state press. I would ask how the Chinese feel “Chinglish” is impacting their cultural jargon, but they probably wouldn’t be allowed to read this. BBC reports:

China has banned newspapers, publishers and website-owners from using foreign words – particularly English ones.

China’s state press and publishing body said such words were sullying the purity of the Chinese language.

It said standardised Chinese should be the norm: the press should avoid foreign abbreviations and acronyms, as well as “Chinglish” – which is a mix of English and Chinese.

The order also extends existing warnings that applied to radio and TV.

[Continues at BBC]

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  • Haystack

    How do you say “wankers” in Mandarin?

  • Haystack

    How do you say “wankers” in Mandarin?

  • rtb61

    Chinglish is adding Chinese words to English, so engnese would be more accurate, adding English words to Chinese.
    Legislating in such a many however is indicative of dangerous egos within the Government of China, ones who resort to the violence of the state in terms of prison and fines to feed their growing need for superiority over all other people, a very dangerous sign indeed.
    Consider the nature of the English language which has absorb many words from many languages over the years and that has be an elemental part of the growth of the language. In this case purity is likely more aligned to the purity of worship of the current leadership of China.

  • Anonymous

    Chinglish is adding Chinese words to English, so engnese would be more accurate, adding English words to Chinese.
    Legislating in such a many however is indicative of dangerous egos within the Government of China, ones who resort to the violence of the state in terms of prison and fines to feed their growing need for superiority over all other people, a very dangerous sign indeed.
    Consider the nature of the English language which has absorb many words from many languages over the years and that has be an elemental part of the growth of the language. In this case purity is likely more aligned to the purity of worship of the current leadership of China.

  • Hadrian999

    i wonder how many people who are mad about this are the same people that throw a fit about bilingual text at the grocery store or on government documents?

  • Hadrian999

    i wonder how many people who are mad about this are the same people that throw a fit about bilingual text at the grocery store or on government documents?

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