Non-Surprise: Assange’s Accuser Linked To CIA

Anna Ardin

Anna Ardin

An interesting ‘coincidence’ in the still unfolding honey pot trap that has ensnared Julian Assange. From Kirk Murphy at Firedoglake.com:

Yesterday Alexander Cockburn reminded us of the news Israel Shamir and Paul Bennett broke at Counterpunch in September. Julian Assange’s chief accuser in Sweden has a significant history of work with anti-Castro groups, at least one of which is US funded and openly supported by a former CIA agent convicted in the mass murder of seventy three Cubans on an airliner he was involved in blowing up.

Anna Ardin (the official complainant) is often described by the media as a “leftist”. She has ties to the US-financed anti-Castro and anti-communist groups. She published her anti-Castro diatribes (see here and here) in the Swedish-language publication Revista de Asignaturas Cubanas put out by Misceláneas de Cuba. From Oslo, Professor Michael Seltzer points out that this periodical is the product of a well-financed anti-Castro organization in Sweden. He further notes that the group is connected with Union Liberal Cubana led by Carlos Alberto Montaner whose CIA ties were exposed here.

Quelle surprise, no? Shamir and Bennett went on to write about Ardin’s history in Cuba with a US funded group openly supported by a real terrorist: Luis Posada Carriles.

In Cuba she interacted with the feminist anti-Castro group Las damas de blanco (the Ladies in White). This group receives US government funds and the convicted anti-communist terrorist Luis Posada Carriles is a friend and supporter. Wikipedia quotes Hebe de Bonafini, president of the Argentine Madres de Plaza de Mayo as saying that “the so-called Ladies in White defend the terrorism of the United States.”

Who is Luis Posada Carriles? He’s a mass murderer, and former CIA agent…

[continues at at Firedoglake.com]

54 Comments on "Non-Surprise: Assange’s Accuser Linked To CIA"

  1. emperorreagan | Dec 6, 2010 at 3:39 pm |

    The only surprise is the bizarre Swedish law that he’s being charged under. Broken condoms and/or not using a condom can be called rape?

  2. emperorreagan | Dec 6, 2010 at 11:39 am |

    The only surprise is the bizarre Swedish law that he’s being charged under. Broken condoms and/or not using a condom can be called rape?

  3. Anonymous | Dec 6, 2010 at 4:57 pm |

    Yep, no surprise here.

  4. Yep, no surprise here.

  5. Other Mr. T. | Dec 6, 2010 at 5:12 pm |

    Well, she’s famous now. For about 15 minutes. Narcissist. A false accusation of rape used as a political weapon to censor whistle blowers against war profiteering, torture and central banking crimes. What happened to famously libertine Swedish attitudes towards promiscuity? Please skype-cast the trial. I’d like to see the ‘crime re-enactment’ in slo-mo. This is so Freudian!

  6. Other Mr. T. | Dec 6, 2010 at 1:12 pm |

    Well, she’s famous now. For about 15 minutes. Narcissist. A false accusation of rape used as a political weapon to censor whistle blowers against war profiteering, torture and central banking crimes. What happened to famously libertine Swedish attitudes towards promiscuity? Please skype-cast the trial. I’d like to see the ‘crime re-enactment’ in slo-mo. This is so Freudian!

  7. Liam_McGonagle | Dec 6, 2010 at 6:17 pm |

    I wonder if there’s any info in the last round of State Department leaks that sheds light about why Sweden would allow itself to be embroilled in this type of transparent character assasination?

    I always had the impression that Sweden was one of the Western countries least suceptible to U.S. blackmail. Though I have to admit that I have never followed events in that country much. Maybe the U.S. has got some dirt on the Swedes themselves?

  8. Liam_McGonagle | Dec 6, 2010 at 2:17 pm |

    I wonder if there’s any info in the last round of State Department leaks that sheds light about why Sweden would allow itself to be embroilled in this type of transparent character assasination?

    I always had the impression that Sweden was one of the Western countries least suceptible to U.S. blackmail. Though I have to admit that I have never followed events in that country much. Maybe the U.S. has got some dirt on the Swedes themselves?

    • Hadrian999 | Dec 6, 2010 at 3:08 pm |

      most likely it’s money, lots of black budget dollars floating around, you really only have to bribe a handfull of officials for something like this and who is more susceptible to bribery than a government official

      • Liam_McGonagle | Dec 6, 2010 at 3:56 pm |

        I guess it really could be as simple as all that.

        But I had always thought that Americans, Canadians and Russians were more suceptible to old fashioned bribery, though, because we came from such huge countries where a body could easily get lost in the crowd–plenty of opportunity to start over from scratch under relative anonymity without trying too hard.

        In contrast, I had a notion that these Scandanavian countries are so small that any sudden inflow of obscene amounts of wealth would get one flagged as a tout right away. I know it’s that way in Ireland. The damn country’s just so small that it doesn’t take long for someone to get the 4-1-1 on you.

        • Liam_McGonagle | Dec 6, 2010 at 4:07 pm |

          On second thought, I retract the previous statement. Clearly common sense has never thwarted any greed driven crime.

          I have to remember to keep my logic gene in check from time to time.

          • Hadrian999 | Dec 6, 2010 at 5:15 pm |

            while your being logical ponder this,
            with so many leaks of classified info wouldn’t it be rational to assume any dirt the us govt could possibly have would see the light of day no matter what rendering any blackmail ineffective?

          • Liam_McGonagle | Dec 6, 2010 at 8:53 pm |

            Well, going forward, without a doubt.

            But I think the general consensus is that these leaks were just unprecedented in terms of scale and the public’s direct access to the original documents. Although a lot of media and information theorists probably predicted that something of this sort would eventually happen, I think almost all of the people formulating and implementing the policies comforted themselves with the notion that it was just a THEORETICAL–not practical–inevitability.

            Just like Republican’ts don’t seem to have apprehended that their tax cut proposals will both finally break the Treasury and take much-needed capital out of the real economy. “That’s all just ‘tomorrow talk'”, they think to themselves. “We’ll work it out when and if it actually happens.”

          • Hadrian999 | Dec 7, 2010 at 4:06 am |

            yes but political blackmail relies on the assumption that the blackmailer will keep your secret if you comply,
            if the blackmailer can’t even keep it’s own secrets there is no reason to think they can keep your secret making compliance with their demands pointless.

          • Marinapratt36 | Dec 9, 2010 at 9:39 am |

            Liam, the republican’ts don’t care. Follow the money—Someone wants something very badly and they will do anything to destablilize the American system of government to get it. I personally have no idea what that something is by the way but I am collecting options. What could it be….? Don’t forgeet now, the USofA is not a single independent entity —it has not been for a century at the very least. So I would suggest this is bigger than a bread box. that is why transparancy is so urgent. That is why transparancy is so scary.

    • gondolfin | Dec 6, 2010 at 5:59 pm |

      Stockholm is our age Vienna. Tongue tied or split tongue, it hosts the 8000 servers in the White Mountains bunker..the Swedish mainstrem media seems extremly naive.. and their’s herds of spies inside the nation.

      http://www.nrk.no/nyheter/verden/1.7412382

      sorry no subtitles..

    • Ideology doesn’t have boundaries…and in this case its the world of the pro-secrecy/anti-open-net crowd vs. the NetNeutrality/Wikileaks fans. Sweden, for all its comparative liberality, is as subject to the ebb and flow of politics as any other place…and certain agencies, specifically corporations and governments, despise the very concept of a group that would happily expose misdeeds…and there are plenty of zealots on both sides.

      Clearly, the US has pushed discretely to stop Wikileaks and punish Assange, but beyond even that, there are people such as Ny, the prosecutor, who are as willing to bend law as our own supreme court when their ideological beliefs are in play.

      • Liam_McGonagle | Dec 7, 2010 at 4:17 pm |

        Yeah, you’re right. But I’m kinda going through a growth spurt here. A rather painful one.

        Obama pretty much just owned up to being a sellout asswhipe in front of my very eyes, touting what a great deal yet another tax giveaway to the elite will be. Even while it’s clear that it’ll benefit less than 1.4% of all small businesses.

        http://dystopiadiaries.blogspot.com/2010/12/economy-of-crow-bird-brains-want-to.html

        So that’s what I’ve got on my plate: Writing Obama off forever, as well as giving up on the possibility of mediating foreign policy dissatisfaction through traditional media.

        While it’s not ALL bad–my senators Feingold and Kohl have always been cool, even if Feingold leaves and that running sore Paul Ryan becomes House budget leader in January–it’s still pretty fuckin’ bad. I can’t give up the ghost altogether, though.

        Start all over again. Throw Obama out, take over the Dem’s from the left. Or something. I don’t know. Still working through this. But I’m not gonna go crazy like some dumbass posters who insist on quoting unverified sources scandalizing anyone who’s ever done anything because they once passed someone on the street who’s a third cousin twice removed of bank teller for JP Morgan Chase.

        NOT that you do that, of course. You’ve always seemed straight-up O.K. to me, with a good head on your shoulders. But it seems to me that the high level of mis-trust in our institutions, though often justified, can lead to some pretty barmy conclusions at times.

        Maybe I should just be grateful that there are guys like Assange willing to do this stuff.

        • Thanks for the vote of confidence 🙂

          Truth be told, I went thru my tinfoil hat phase a couple decades ago…but my innate cynicism overwhelmed that inclination. I noticed as decades passed that, depending on who you ask, the source of all conspiracy evil shifts from group to group in tandem with whatever that person has already decided they hate most (Communists/Socialists/Nazis/Fascists/Aliens/Masons/Reptilians/Christians/Muslims/Jews/Brit Royals/ etc etc etc ad infinitum).

          Eventually I came to the conclusion that many things look conspiratorial but are actually the natural responses of any person/group in power at any given moment. Take any group of people in any similar situation where influence can be exercised to achieve short term gain…and they will usually act in their own interest…not because they believe in some secret cabal or credo that guides them.

          In the end there is only one great threat and it isn’t conspiracy…its that wealth and power move inevitably to establish greater security for themselves…always and without exception…at the expense of all others. To be a conspiracy it would have to be secretive and limited to a small group of people who are ‘in the know’…but it isn’t limited…it evident everywhere in every society at the same time and has been since civilization began…

          and in reality almost every person with even moderate education who isn’t an open apologist for modern conservatism already knows and watches every move that the entrenched wealthy make. Not much of a conspiracy if anyone with an IQ over 100 can spot it from a mile away. Its human nature in action…not the final endgame of some master chessplayers hidden from view.

          And there we are…watching governments who represent stability for the very wealthy and influential working overtime to quash the free flow of information…not in conspiratorial fashion…but in broad daylight. If there is a ‘them’ to be quantified in an ‘us vs. them’ scenario…it would consist of politicians and businessmen of every stripe…each jockeying to secure their immediate interests…with everyone else’s best interest being of the least concern.

          And thus I cheer for Assange…because even if he loses…he made the other players show their hands in public. If it goes down in history that the web is to be a closely monitored strictly controlled virtual corporate playground where disruptive material is forbidden…at least it will be a matter of public record when people ask how it happened. And that was his point…whether greater freedom emerges or greater tyranny results…he made the players show where they stand without the convenient screen of words to hide behind…and everyone had to pick a side. Quite a legacy for one guy to leave behind 😉

  9. Hadrian999 | Dec 6, 2010 at 7:08 pm |

    most likely it’s money, lots of black budget dollars floating around, you really only have to bribe a handfull of officials for something like this and who is more susceptible to bribery than a government official

  10. Travel Advisory for Sweden: Do not have sex. If you have sex, please wear two or more condoms for legal protection. If the condom breaks, Sweden rapes you.

    Countries should get Interpol to catch people under suspicion of “rape by missing condom”. Very useful service. Should make the world safer.

  11. Travel Advisory for Sweden: Do not have sex. If you have sex, please wear two or more condoms for legal protection. If the condom breaks, Sweden rapes you.

    Countries should get Interpol to catch people under suspicion of “rape by missing condom”. Very useful service. Should make the world safer.

  12. Liam_McGonagle | Dec 6, 2010 at 7:56 pm |

    I guess it really could be as simple as all that.

    But I had always thought that Americans, Canadians and Russians were more suceptible to old fashioned bribery, though, because we came from such huge countries where a body could easily get lost in the crowd–plenty of opportunity to start over from scratch under relative anonymity without trying too hard.

    In contrast, I had a notion that these Scandanavian countries are so small that any sudden inflow of obscene amounts of wealth would get one flagged as a tout right away. I know it’s that way in Ireland. The damn country’s just so small that it doesn’t take long for someone to get the 4-1-1 on you.

  13. Liam_McGonagle | Dec 6, 2010 at 8:07 pm |

    On second thought, I retract the previous statement. Clearly common sense has never thwarted any greed driven crime.

    I have to remember to keep my logic gene in check from time to time.

  14. Hadrian999 | Dec 6, 2010 at 9:15 pm |

    while your being logical ponder this,
    with so many leaks of classified info wouldn’t it be rational to assume any dirt the us govt could possibly have would see the light of day no matter what rendering any blackmail ineffective?

  15. Anonymous | Dec 6, 2010 at 9:59 pm |

    Stockholm is our age Vienna. Tongue tied or split tongue, it hosts the 8000 servers in the White Mountains bunker..the Swedish mainstrem media seems extremly naive.. and their’s herds of spies inside the nation.

    http://www.nrk.no/nyheter/verden/1.7412382

    sorry no subtitles..

  16. Liam_McGonagle | Dec 7, 2010 at 12:53 am |

    Well, going forward, without a doubt.

    But I think the general consensus is that these leaks were just unprecedented in terms of scale and the public’s direct access to the original documents. Although a lot of media and information theorists probably predicted that something of this sort would eventually happen, I think almost all of the people formulating and implementing the policies comforted themselves with the notion that it was just a THEORETICAL–not practical–inevitability.

    Just like Republican’ts don’t seem to have apprehended that their tax cut proposals will both finally break the Treasury and take much-needed capital out of the real economy. “That’s all just ‘tomorrow talk'”, they think to themselves. “We’ll work it out when and if it actually happens.”

  17. Ideology doesn’t have boundaries…and in this case its the world of the pro-secrecy/anti-open-net crowd vs. the NetNeutrality/Wikileaks fans. Sweden, for all its comparative liberality, is as subject to the ebb and flow of politics as any other place…and certain agencies, specifically corporations and governments, despise the very concept of a group that would happily expose misdeeds…and there are plenty of zealots on both sides.

    Clearly, the US has pushed discretely to stop Wikileaks and punish Assange, but beyond even that, there are people such as Ny, the prosecutor, who are as willing to bend law as our own supreme court when their ideological beliefs are in play.

  18. Guest8768765765 | Dec 7, 2010 at 3:00 am |

    Why hasn’t someone put a bullet into Julian Assange yet?

    Yo, US Government! Right here! free of charge! I’ll do it!
    Little fag should be drown.

  19. Guest8768765765 | Dec 6, 2010 at 11:00 pm |

    Why hasn’t someone put a bullet into Julian Assange yet?

    Yo, US Government! Right here! free of charge! I’ll do it!
    Little fag should be drown.

    • buck weet | Dec 7, 2010 at 9:52 pm |

      You have proven conclusively that you are a complete idiot. Good day, Sir.

  20. not adding up | Dec 7, 2010 at 3:31 am |

    if shes listed as a leftist figure, dont you think that if this was conspiracy 101 that she would have been listed as a right winger? 1+2!=5

  21. not adding up | Dec 6, 2010 at 11:31 pm |

    if shes listed as a leftist figure, dont you think that if this was conspiracy 101 that she would have been listed as a right winger? 1+2!=5

  22. Hadrian999 | Dec 7, 2010 at 8:06 am |

    yes but political blackmail relies on the assumption that the blackmailer will keep your secret if you comply,
    if the blackmailer can’t even keep it’s own secrets there is no reason to think they can keep your secret making compliance with their demands pointless.

  23. Cerebralcaustic | Dec 7, 2010 at 5:09 pm |

    Believe the victims of sexual assault!

    Break the silence!

    Shatter the patriarchal laws that shame victims’ reputations!

    Except when we agree with the politics of the accused. In those cases, the victim is a CIA agent.

  24. Anonymous | Dec 7, 2010 at 8:17 pm |

    Yeah, you’re right. But I’m kinda going through a growth spurt here. A rather painful one.

    Obama pretty much just owned up to being a sellout asswhipe in front of my very eyes, touting what a great deal yet another tax giveaway to the elite will be. Even while it’s clear that it’ll benefit less than 1.4% of all small businesses.

    http://dystopiadiaries.blogspot.com/2010/12/economy-of-crow-bird-brains-want-to.html

    So that’s what I’ve got on my plate: Writing Obama off forever, as well as giving up on the possibility of mediating foreign policy dissatisfaction through traditional media.

    While it’s not ALL bad–my senators Feingold and Kohl have always been cool, even if Feingold leaves and that running sore Paul Ryan becomes House budget leader in January–it’s still pretty fuckin’ bad. I can’t give up the ghost altogether, though.

    Start all over again. Throw Obama out, take over the Dem’s from the left. Or something. I don’t know. Still working through this. But I’m not gonna go crazy like some dumbass posters who insist on quoting unverified sources scandalizing anyone who’s ever done anything because they once passed someone on the street who’s a third cousin twice removed of bank teller for JP Morgan Chase.

    NOT that you do that, of course. You’ve always seemed straight-up O.K. to me, with a good head on your shoulders. But it seems to me that the high level of mis-trust in our institutions, though often justified, can lead to some pretty barmy conclusions at times.

    Maybe I should just be grateful that there are guys like Assange willing to do this stuff.

  25. Anonymous | Dec 7, 2010 at 8:18 pm |

    Thanks for the info, Gondolfin.

  26. buck weet | Dec 8, 2010 at 1:52 am |

    You have proven conclusively that you are a complete idiot. Good day, Sir.

  27. Nitromidas | Dec 8, 2010 at 2:01 am |

    The arrest-warrant was issued because Assange didn’t meet for questioning in connection to a sexual assault case. Him being famous does not make him immune to the law. Period. His guilt or inocence will be determined by in a court of law, just like everybody else. It is only in dictatorships and the US that habeus corpus is set aside when the acused is claimed to be a terrorist.

    Sweden isn’t a dictatorship, nor is it a US sattelite. Besides, he is being held in the UK, which is much closer to the US than any Western European country.

  28. Nitromidas | Dec 7, 2010 at 10:01 pm |

    The arrest-warrant was issued because Assange didn’t meet for questioning in connection to a sexual assault case. Him being famous does not make him immune to the law. Period. His guilt or inocence will be determined by in a court of law, just like everybody else. It is only in dictatorships and the US that habeus corpus is set aside when the acused is claimed to be a terrorist.

    Sweden isn’t a dictatorship, nor is it a US sattelite. Besides, he is being held in the UK, which is much closer to the US than any Western European country.

  29. Well thats quite a liberal thought from you…I was expecting the usual screed about how women are all liberal elitist bitches who hate men and lie about sexual encounters just to extort money and fame from them because our Marxist lesbian run legal system favors the whims of women over the rights of men and the liberal media conspires to make this look acceptable because they’re all in on it…

    …except this time the ‘victim’ of those machinations is someone despised by right wing media…so your answer is quite different this time. Interesting…irony must escape from you more often than passed gas.

  30. anonymous | Dec 8, 2010 at 4:11 pm |

    Ah your citing Israel Shamir, notorious anti-semite and holocaust denier from Sweden. Nice…

    And Mrs Ardin is a CIA rep because she wants democracy on Cuba and visited a dissident group on Cuba that got the the Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought from the European Parliament….eh?

    Pathetic

  31. anonymous | Dec 8, 2010 at 12:11 pm |

    Ah your citing Israel Shamir, notorious anti-semite and holocaust denier from Sweden. Nice…

    And Mrs Ardin is a CIA rep because she wants democracy on Cuba and visited a dissident group on Cuba that got the the Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought from the European Parliament….eh?

    Pathetic

  32. According to Swedish law (the misandrist ‘make it up as we go along’ type), you can be prosecuted for rape if
    A) the condom breaks and
    B) you are a non-lesbian male or
    C) the FemiNazi fails to climax first or
    D) she has second thoughts a few weeks later and
    E) it becomes a case of ‘retroactively withdrawn coital consent’

    Naturally, the only defence allowed is to neuter yourself on Court.TV with a steak-knife, as a warning to other rapists.

    Strangely, in the Assange case, they have not even charged him with any criminal offence at all, but seem to want to use Interpol/EAW to drag him in shackled to be asked if he would like to have a free AIDS test.

    Hopefully Assange will successfully resist the extradition to face such a stinking injustice, and will be released on bail to continue his profession while this ludicrous judicial farce unwinds.

  33. According to Swedish law (the misandrist ‘make it up as we go along’ type), you can be prosecuted for rape if
    A) the condom breaks and
    B) you are a non-lesbian male or
    C) the FemiNazi fails to climax first or
    D) she has second thoughts a few weeks later and
    E) it becomes a case of ‘retroactively withdrawn coital consent’

    Naturally, the only defence allowed is to neuter yourself on Court.TV with a steak-knife, as a warning to other rapists.

    Strangely, in the Assange case, they have not even charged him with any criminal offence at all, but seem to want to use Interpol/EAW to drag him in shackled to be asked if he would like to have a free AIDS test.

    Hopefully Assange will successfully resist the extradition to face such a stinking injustice, and will be released on bail to continue his profession while this ludicrous judicial farce unwinds.

    • Good job. A response like that is sure to help keep resistance divided. Just like the CIA planned when it framed him.

      • “Good job.”
        ~~ Thanks.

        “A response like that is sure to help keep resistance divided.”
        ~~ When wigs are beaten, lice will fall.

        “Just like the CIA planned when it framed him.”
        ~~ If the CIA are truly this incompetent at framing targets, I am delighted.

        • If you’re that incompetent at seeing how you’re being played, the CIA is delighted.

  34. Good job. A response like that is sure to help keep resistance divided. Just like the CIA planned when it framed him.

  35. Marinapratt36 | Dec 9, 2010 at 1:39 pm |

    Liam, the republican’ts don’t care. Follow the money—Someone wants something very badly and they will do anything to destablilize the American system of government to get it. I personally have no idea what that something is by the way but I am collecting options. What could it be….? Don’t forgeet now, the USofA is not a single independent entity —it has not been for a century at the very least. So I would suggest this is bigger than a bread box. that is why transparancy is so urgent. That is why transparancy is so scary.

  36. “Good job.”
    ~~ Thanks.

    “A response like that is sure to help keep resistance divided.”
    ~~ When wigs are beaten, lice will fall.

    “Just like the CIA planned when it framed him.”
    ~~ If the CIA are truly this incompetent at framing targets, I am delighted.

  37. If you’re that incompetent at seeing how you’re being played, the CIA is delighted.

  38. Thanks for the vote of confidence 🙂

    Truth be told, I went thru my tinfoil hat phase a couple decades ago…but my innate cynicism overwhelmed that inclination. I noticed as decades passed that, depending on who you ask, the source of all conspiracy evil shifts from group to group in tandem with whatever that person has already decided they hate most (Communists/Socialists/Nazis/Fascists/Aliens/Masons/Reptilians/Christians/Muslims/Jews/Brit Royals/ etc etc etc ad infinitum).

    Eventually I came to the conclusion that many things look conspiratorial but are actually the natural responses of any person/group in power at any given moment. Take any group of people in any similar situation where influence can be exercised to achieve short term gain…and they will usually act in their own interest…not because they believe in some secret cabal or credo that guides them.

    In the end there is only one great threat and it isn’t conspiracy…its that wealth and power move inevitably to establish greater security for themselves…always and without exception…at the expense of all others. To be a conspiracy it would have to be secretive and limited to a small group of people who are ‘in the know’…but it isn’t limited…it evident everywhere in every society at the same time and has been since civilization began…

    and in reality almost every person with even moderate education who isn’t an open apologist for modern conservatism already knows and watches every move that the entrenched wealthy make. Not much of a conspiracy if anyone with an IQ over 100 can spot it from a mile away. Its human nature in action…not the final endgame of some master chessplayers hidden from view.

    And there we are…watching governments who represent stability for the very wealthy and influential working overtime to quash the free flow of information…not in conspiratorial fashion…but in broad daylight. If there is a ‘them’ to be quantified in an ‘us vs. them’ scenario…it would consist of politicians and businessmen of every stripe…each jockeying to secure their immediate interests…with everyone else’s best interest being of the least concern.

    And thus I cheer for Assange…because even if he loses…he made the other players show their hands in public. If it goes down in history that the web is to be a closely monitored strictly controlled virtual corporate playground where disruptive material is forbidden…at least it will be a matter of public record when people ask how it happened. And that was his point…whether greater freedom emerges or greater tyranny results…he made the players show where they stand without the convenient screen of words to hide behind…and everyone had to pick a side. Quite a legacy for one guy to leave behind 😉

Comments are closed.