Ron Paul, Suddenly In The Mainstream

Ron PaulWhen Republican Congressman Ron Paul, tagged ‘Dr.No’ inside the Beltway in reference to his consistent “No” votes to any legislation he deems unconstitutional, is the subject of a fawning front page profile in the New York Times, you know that the political mood of America has changed direction:

As virtually all of Washington was declaring WikiLeaks’s disclosures of secret diplomatic cables an act of treason, Representative Ron Paul was applauding the organization for exposing the United States’ “delusional foreign policy.”

For this, the conservative blog RedState dubbed him “Al Qaeda’s favorite member of Congress.”

It was hardly the first time that Mr. Paul had marched to his own beat. During his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination in 2008, he was best remembered for declaring in a debate that the 9/11 attacks were the Muslim world’s response to American military intervention around the globe. A fellow candidate, former Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani of New York, interrupted and demanded that he take back the words — a request that Mr. Paul refused.

During his 20 years in Congress, Mr. Paul has staked out the lonely end of 434-to-1 votes against legislation that he considers unconstitutional, even on issues as ceremonial as granting Mother Teresa a Congressional Gold Medal. His colleagues have dubbed him “Dr. No,” but his wife will insist that they have the spelling wrong: he is really Dr. Know.

Now it appears others are beginning to credit him with some wisdom — or at least acknowledging his passionate following.

After years of blocking him from a leadership position, Mr. Paul’s fellow Republicans have named him chairman of the House subcommittee on domestic monetary policy, which oversees the Federal Reserve as well as the currency and the valuation of the dollar.

Mr. Paul has strong views on those issues. He has written a book called “End the Fed”; he embraces Austrian economic thought, which holds that the government has no role in regulating the economy; and he advocates a return to the gold standard.

Many of the new Republicans in the next Congress campaigned on precisely the issues that Mr. Paul has been talking about for 40 years: forbidding Congress from any action not explicitly authorized in the Constitution, eliminating entire federal departments as unconstitutional and checking the power of the Fed.

He has been called the “intellectual godfather of the Tea Party,” but he also is the real father of the Tea Party movement’s most high-profile winner, Senator-elect Rand Paul of Kentucky. (The two will be roommates in Ron Paul’s Virginia condominium. “I told him as long as he didn’t expect me to cook,” the elder Mr. Paul said. “I’m not going to take care of him the way his mother did.”)…

[continues in the New York Times]

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  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_GRIR2GI2EZW6RVKTQNKXGCCO7U Norris

    Wonderful man.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_GRIR2GI2EZW6RVKTQNKXGCCO7U Norris

    Wonderful man.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_GRIR2GI2EZW6RVKTQNKXGCCO7U Norris

    Wonderful man.

  • http://voxmagi-necessarywords.blogspot.com/ VoxMagi

    I can disagree with Ron Paul about almost everything…but I still can’t help but admire and respect a guy who speaks his mind and annoys the hell out of the “status quo goon squad”.

  • http://voxmagi-necessarywords.blogspot.com/ VoxMagi

    I can disagree with Ron Paul about almost everything…but I still can’t help but admire and respect a guy who speaks his mind and annoys the hell out of the “status quo goon squad”.

  • Pingback: Welcome Home, Mr. Paul

  • John Brown

    If this guy ever theoretically won the presidency, you can bet your sweet ass this proponent of “civil liberties” would come down hard on LGBT rights, minorities and the poor and disenfranchised in this country. All he is, is the nostalgic tear in the eye of conservatives for a pre-Reaganite republican party, nothing more nothing less. He’s just a more watered-down version of the same thinly veiled racist dirtbag politician, master of doublespeak, who will say what you want to hear while doing otherwise when given the opportunity or behind closed doors. In short, this man is the Libertarian Barack Obama waiting to happen.

  • John Brown

    If this guy ever theoretically won the presidency, you can bet your sweet ass this proponent of “civil liberties” would come down hard on LGBT rights, minorities and the poor and disenfranchised in this country. All he is, is the nostalgic tear in the eye of conservatives for a pre-Reaganite republican party, nothing more nothing less. He’s just a more watered-down version of the same thinly veiled racist dirtbag politician, master of doublespeak, who will say what you want to hear while doing otherwise when given the opportunity or behind closed doors. In short, this man is the Libertarian Barack Obama waiting to happen.

    • http://twitter.com/glacialheart Luke Brady

      @John Brown I challenge you to listen to ANY speech he has ever given on the house floor. There are so few principled, consistent and uncompromising statesmen as Dr. Ron Paul. It’s a shame you can’t tell him apart from the rest.

      • FreedomRider69
        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_UQFTKAFTLDZJ2PFFGQINTQK4ZY Sasha K

          Posting links without comment or considering their trustworthiness is the same as simply posting “I have no thoughts of my own.”

          We’ve all read that article. And, to the extent that it tries to paint Ron Paul as a racist, it’s BS.

          “Look at this fucking racist. Wants to end the apartheid war on drugs and let all the young black men out of prison. Might as well be wearing a KKK hood.”

    • Madmanmikey

      I dare say you are wrong, J.B. It was astounding to hear him speak in defense of Wikileaks (got the link through Disinfo). Still, the proof will be in the putting, as Dad used to say. If Paul ascends in power we will see if he follows through on what he’s said so far. I think he will, but let’s see.

    • marc

      With all due respect, I feel you are speaking out of ignorance. Ron Paul has repeatedly criticized his own party for their socially conservative platform. He is pro gay marriage, anti-drug war, and unlike these tea party idiots, a true Libertarian.

    • Dan Mac

      Do you have anything legitimate to back up anything you’ve stated here? Any evidence? Your statement, based on all the evidence I have carefully studied, appears to be the exact opposite of truth.

  • Nyxynox

    The only thing I agree with Ron Paul on is shutting down The Fed. I don’t agree with what he would like to do after that. AND I totally DO NOT agree with any of his social policy. This guy is scary in many ways.

  • Nyxynox

    The only thing I agree with Ron Paul on is shutting down The Fed. I don’t agree with what he would like to do after that. AND I totally DO NOT agree with any of his social policy. This guy is scary in many ways.

  • http://twitter.com/glacialheart Luke Brady

    @John Brown I challenge you to listen to ANY speech he has ever given on the house floor. There are so few principled, consistent and uncompromising statesmen as Dr. Ron Paul. It’s a shame you can’t tell him apart from the rest.

  • Ich bin ein Iraqi

    I’m not a libertarian, though I will grudgingly support those libertarians who are anti-authoritarian. I listened to Ron Paul’s five minutes on the house floor. I can find no fault with it. But anyone who thinks Ron Paul, or anyone else, can reform the dying republic that is the US is just plain deluded. It’s too late. Change will come from outside the system, if it comes at all.

  • Ich bin ein Iraqi

    I’m not a libertarian, though I will grudgingly support those libertarians who are anti-authoritarian. I listened to Ron Paul’s five minutes on the house floor. I can find no fault with it. But anyone who thinks Ron Paul, or anyone else, can reform the dying republic that is the US is just plain deluded. It’s too late. Change will come from outside the system, if it comes at all.

    • Hadrian999

      libertarianism is a beautiful idea, the problem with it is what it would lead to if taken to its logical conclusion, I can’t see it leading to anything but corporate feudalism.

      • Dan Mac

        It’s the deceitful monopoly creating crony capitalism we have now that is leading to corporate feudalism–not free market. We have never had a truly libertarian free market. Of course, such a thing would have to have laws–to protect it against governmental policies that undermine true freedom. It’s when corporate representatives worm their way into government, and write policy that benefits them at the expense of individuals that we end up where we are. Living under the oppression of a conglomeration of cartels in partnership with a supposedly independent government.

        • Hadrian999

          i agree but under true libertarianism there would be nothing to stop the powerful from entrenching themselves weather it be by controlling government, resources, infrastructure or with hired guns.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_UQFTKAFTLDZJ2PFFGQINTQK4ZY Sasha K

        Many libertarians, particularly of the popular Murray Rothbard camp that Ron Paul is very influenced by, support totally ending the institution of the corporation altogether. Business is wonderful and crucially important, but the corporation, where individuals are protected from liability but are able to responsibility but can keep all the profits, is a broken and logically inconsistent organization.

  • FreedomRider69
  • DeepCough

    The fact that Ron Paul, a Texas Republican, pisses off a conservative blog like RedState is a sign: he’s our last hope.

  • DeepCough

    The fact that Ron Paul, a Texas Republican, pisses off a conservative blog like RedState is a sign: he’s our last hope.

  • DeepCough

    The fact that Ron Paul, a Texas Republican, pisses off a conservative blog like RedState is a sign: he’s our last hope.

  • John

    It’s pretty sad that anyone who doesn’t agree with mainstream media, is either dubbed a terrorist, or a terrorist sympathizer. Ron Paul for President

  • John

    It’s pretty sad that anyone who doesn’t agree with mainstream media, is either dubbed a terrorist, or a terrorist sympathizer. Ron Paul for President

  • Hadrian999

    libertarianism is a beautiful idea, the problem with it is what it would lead to if taken to its logical conclusion, I can’t see it leading to anything but corporate feudalism.

  • jonsol69

    “The average age of the world’s greatest civilization has been two hundred years. These nations have progressed through this sequence; from bondage to spiritual faith; from spiritual faith to great courage; from great courage to liberty; from liberty to abundance; from abundance to selfishness; from selfishness to complacency; from complacency to apathy; from apathy to dependence; from dependence back to bondage.” – Sir Alex Fraser Tyler. Scottish historian, 1742-1813. Source: The Decline and Fall of the Atehnian Republic. C.1799.

    I am not an American, but have visited and worked there on several occasions. I have had the privilege of meeting friendly warm and helpful people; from the Midwest to the west coast. Let’s face it we’ve all had years of being dumbed down. Many folks from countries all over the world are being squeezed to benefit others and that’s just putting it mildly. Our governments have been overwhelming lacking in their obligation to serve the public from whom they profit.

    Mr Paul’s words appear born of sound sense, they are compelling and I have little doubt of his integrity. There are few apparently as honest sounding or as convincing at least in rhetoric. Nonetheless, they are merely words and I wonder if more people will suffer disappointment or worse after being led down another blind alley.

    Oppression is becoming the global catch phrase, but it’s nothing new according to non-aligned philosophers, writers, historians and intellectuals of the past and present.
    Daily doses of MSM, de-educational systems, programing consent, pre-emptive programming, social/ cultural and or behavioural engineering, along with the heaps of psychological tools worked against our ability to reason or question by methodical processes in every facet of our lives.

    e.g.
    Where we ever taught competently the bad things about democracy, statism or government?
    Where we ever taught about the resulting similarities in practice between communism, socialism or fascism? In other words ‘collectivism.’
    Where we ever taught that it is the intelligentsia, super rich/elite/powerful that appear to be behind these collectivist political movements for purposes other than for the people?
    Where we ever taught that we do not have free markets, our FIAT usury debt based currencies are manipulated for legalised fraud.
    Where we ever taught that the government is the only organisation that reserves the right to initiate violence against its people or other nations without our approval, consent and furthermore disempowers legally to maintain unjust control?
    Where we ever given the whole history of anomalies such as out of place part amongst others, or the cold facts known about climate as a whole, rather than the manipulation by Frankenstein minded scientists for hire?

    There are many more examples and analytical works on these subjects by academically well respected people. When we reach conclusions post reason on discovered truths; we can logically surmise that leaders, powers that be and or self-styled elites, and or their groups/ organizations, are in point of fact, quite insane, should be institutionalised and dosed with chlorpromazine.

  • Guest

    “The average age of the world’s greatest civilization has been two hundred years. These nations have progressed through this sequence; from bondage to spiritual faith; from spiritual faith to great courage; from great courage to liberty; from liberty to abundance; from abundance to selfishness; from selfishness to complacency; from complacency to apathy; from apathy to dependence; from dependence back to bondage.” – Sir Alex Fraser Tyler. Scottish historian, 1742-1813. Source: The Decline and Fall of the Atehnian Republic. C.1799.

    I am not an American, but have visited and worked there on several occasions. I have had the privilege of meeting friendly warm and helpful people; from the Midwest to the west coast. Let’s face it we’ve all had years of being dumbed down. Many folks from countries all over the world are being squeezed to benefit others and that’s just putting it mildly. Our governments have been overwhelming lacking in their obligation to serve the public from whom they profit.

    Mr Paul’s words appear born of sound sense, they are compelling and I have little doubt of his integrity. There are few apparently as honest sounding or as convincing at least in rhetoric. Nonetheless, they are merely words and I wonder if more people will suffer disappointment or worse after being led down another blind alley.

    Oppression is becoming the global catch phrase, but it’s nothing new according to non-aligned philosophers, writers, historians and intellectuals of the past and present.
    Daily doses of MSM, de-educational systems, programing consent, pre-emptive programming, social/ cultural and or behavioural engineering, along with the heaps of psychological tools worked against our ability to reason or question by methodical processes in every facet of our lives.

    e.g.
    Where we ever taught competently the bad things about democracy, statism or government?
    Where we ever taught about the resulting similarities in practice between communism, socialism or fascism? In other words ‘collectivism.’
    Where we ever taught that it is the intelligentsia, super rich/elite/powerful that appear to be behind these collectivist political movements for purposes other than for the people?
    Where we ever taught that we do not have free markets, our FIAT usury debt based currencies are manipulated for legalised fraud.
    Where we ever taught that the government is the only organisation that reserves the right to initiate violence against its people or other nations without our approval, consent and furthermore disempowers legally to maintain unjust control?
    Where we ever given the whole history of anomalies such as out of place part amongst others, or the cold facts known about climate as a whole, rather than the manipulation by Frankenstein minded scientists for hire?

    There are many more examples and analytical works on these subjects by academically well respected people. When we reach conclusions post reason on discovered truths; we can logically surmise that leaders, powers that be and or self-styled elites, and or their groups/ organizations, are in point of fact, quite insane, should be institutionalised and dosed with chlorpromazine.

  • Liam_McGonagle

    Yeah, I get a scarily mixed read of Ron.

    It’s wonderfully refreshing to see a registered member of a major party come out and talk common sense about Wikileaks and foreign policy.

    But the weird-ass notions about returning to the Gold Standard and getting rid of the Fed alarm me. Not because he doesn’t have very legitimate and urgent concerns about monetary policy, but because those radical notions are basically mideval and in my current view, an invitation of REAL economic collapse and chaos.

    You need some central institution to clear all monetary transactions. That’s just a fact. Without it, we’ll just cede even more power to the corporate counterfeiting ring. The public will have truly ZERO ability to oversee the creation of commercial money (which, admittedly is only marginally worse than the situation we have now).

    Yes, the Fed isn’t directly accountable to the government–but that indirect reporting relationship is by design, and for a very good reason. Can you imagine how much WORSE and MORE unstable things would be if this policy was subject to pure party politics? We would not merely be ON the road to becoming a Third World nation, we would already BE there by this point.

    And the Gold Standard thing? Well, I could be persuaded that it’d work under certain conditions–but those conditions seem almost entirely unattainable.

    There would have to be a good deal of flexibility of the conversion ratios. Which just opens up a whole ‘nother can of worms. The very strength of Gold as the basis for a currency, its physically finite character, is also a MAJOR barrier to right-sizing the money supply to the real economy’s productive capacity. This is one of the absolutely last-ditch strategies I would ever contemplate, and I haven’t heard a damned thing to change my mind yet.

    Yeah, Ron’s not a total asswhipe. Far from it. But he sure has some crazy ass ideas.

  • Liam_McGonagle

    Yeah, I get a scarily mixed read of Ron.

    It’s wonderfully refreshing to see a registered member of a major party come out and talk common sense about Wikileaks and foreign policy.

    But the weird-ass notions about returning to the Gold Standard and getting rid of the Fed alarm me. Not because he doesn’t have very legitimate and urgent concerns about monetary policy, but because those radical notions are basically mideval and in my current view, an invitation of REAL economic collapse and chaos.

    You need some central institution to clear all monetary transactions. That’s just a fact. Without it, we’ll just cede even more power to the corporate counterfeiting ring. The public will have truly ZERO ability to oversee the creation of commercial money (which, admittedly is only marginally worse than the situation we have now).

    Yes, the Fed isn’t directly accountable to the government–but that indirect reporting relationship is by design, and for a very good reason. Can you imagine how much WORSE and MORE unstable things would be if this policy was subject to pure party politics? We would not merely be ON the road to becoming a Third World nation, we would already BE there by this point.

    And the Gold Standard thing? Well, I could be persuaded that it’d work under certain conditions–but those conditions seem almost entirely unattainable.

    There would have to be a good deal of flexibility of the conversion ratios. Which just opens up a whole ‘nother can of worms. The very strength of Gold as the basis for a currency, its physically finite character, is also a MAJOR barrier to right-sizing the money supply to the real economy’s productive capacity. This is one of the absolutely last-ditch strategies I would ever contemplate, and I haven’t heard a damned thing to change my mind yet.

    Yeah, Ron’s not a total asswhipe. Far from it. But he sure has some crazy ass ideas.

    • Hadrian999

      I cant see the gold standard ever working again.
      by the gold standard a nation that was a wasteland with one gold mine would be measured as wealthier than a nation with no gold but has millions of head of livestock and billions of bushels of grain.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_7IQWEDG6PFI5Y64PGEBKYDSIDY Mark

        The people in the wasteland would trade their gold for the livestock.

        A return to the gold standard and elimination of the Fed would eliminate the temptation to use the money supply to mask economic problems and put off painful adjustments for short term political purposes.

        The Fed is still giving a back door bail-out to the banks by robbing savers with zero percent short term interest rates and guaranteeing huge trading profits for large financial institutions: Ask grandma how much she is getting for her 6-month CD these days.

        God It’s Great To Be A Banker.

        • Hadrian999

          that assumes the gold people didn’t price gouge the livestock which we all know they would, it’s human nature, but the gold standard would lead to the classic problem of too few dollars chasing too many goods.
          it just isn’t an adequate measure of a nations wealth, don’t get me wrong we do need to find a way to to tie currency levels to real value of a nations wealth but gold isn’t it

      • Dan Mac

        Good point–but it would still be better than what we have, by far. Long ago it was grain. It has been beans, too. But we all know what beans are worth…beans. At least they are stable. Script was working very well in colonial America–until a tyrannical government, pushed by the banksters, outlawed it. So, what shall we use? What can back our notes? There must be a measurement of energy….

    • http://voxmagi-necessarywords.blogspot.com/ VoxMagi

      Agreed. Technically, the Gold standard would work great…if we’d never left it…but moving back to that from where we are now would be a seismic event that would make Katrina and Pompeii and all other disasters look like picnics.

    • Dan Mac

      Liam, Vox, while you clearly have very intelligent conversations, on this point I am certain You have it backwards. The Federal Reserve System was designed by representatives of the international banking cartel–for the dual purpose of funneling the nation’s wealth into their own hands–and to place themselves into position for a gradual coup d’etat. It has been nearly one hundred years since the fed’s creation–and now the plan is nearly complete. The Fed, after it creation in 1913, has overseen the crash of 1929, the Great Depression of the thirties, the elimination of gold, silver, or any tangible thing to back up its “notes,” the resulting inflation of prices on everything–as the value of their fiat money depreciates every time they print more–out of thin air–watering down the economic soup of the nation–charging “we the people” interest for debt that they created–money they lend us, which they just print. The Federal Reserve System is the biggest scam in the history of the world.

      Please, folks: if you think you know anything about the fed, take a second look, an alternative look:

      http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-8484911570371055528#

      Then get back to me.

      Thank you

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_UQFTKAFTLDZJ2PFFGQINTQK4ZY Sasha K

      He doesn’t support a gold standard, per se – he supports a system of competing currencies, where different currencies would be used for different purposes. He argues that in such a system, gold backed currencies would rise to prominence – but that’s different from a single “gold standard” dollar.

      In this way, the people would have the power to affect a currency that became debased or associated with corruption, but refusing to use it.

      “The public will have truly ZERO ability to oversee the creation of commercial money (which, admittedly is only marginally worse than the situation we have now).” Correction: that exactly IS the system we have now.

  • Patriot

    Im a democrat but would vote for Ron Paul

  • Patriot

    Im a democrat but would vote for Ron Paul

  • Hadrian999

    I cant see the gold standard ever working again.
    by the gold standard a nation that was a wasteland with one gold mine would be measured as wealthier than a nation with no gold but has millions of head of livestock and billions of bushels of grain.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_7IQWEDG6PFI5Y64PGEBKYDSIDY Mark

    The people in the wasteland would trade their gold for the livestock.

    A return to the gold standard and elimination of the Fed would eliminate the temptation to use the money supply to mask economic problems and put off painful adjustments for short term political purposes.

    The Fed is still giving a back door bail-out to the banks by robbing savers with zero percent short term interest rates and guaranteeing huge trading profits for large financial institutions: Ask grandma how much she is getting for her 6-month CD these days.

    God It’s Great To Be A Banker.

  • Hadrian999

    that assumes the gold people didn’t price gouge the livestock which we all know they would, it’s human nature, but the gold standard would lead to the classic problem of too few dollars chasing too many goods.
    it just isn’t an adequate measure of a nations wealth, don’t get me wrong we do need to find a way to to tie currency levels to real value of a nations wealth but gold isn’t it

  • Madmanmikey

    I dare say you are wrong, J.B. It was astounding to hear him speak in defense of Wikileaks (got the link through Disinfo). Still, the proof will be in the putting, as Dad used to say. If Paul ascends in power we will see if he follows through on what he’s said so far. I think he will, but let’s see.

  • 5by5

    No, he’s not mainstream, he’s just an old school Republican in a party that’s turned into a giant bucket of crazy. So by comparison, Ron Paul looks rational.

    And on some issues, he is (the Fed, Iraq, the surveillance state). On others, not so much (civil rights, helping the poor, and he believes the market actually fixes things, which I think it’s wicked clear it does not).

    But he’s not 100% wrong like a Michelle Bachmann, or creepy like Mitch “Meltface” McConnell, or weepy like the Boehner.

    So like I said, by comparison, he comes off looking better.

    And yes, it is a joy to see the dimwits at Redstate get their panties in a bunch over someone in their party saying something rational.

    • http://voxmagi-necessarywords.blogspot.com/ VoxMagi

      Too true. The guy is sane by default…because the rest of his party drove over the cliff and crashed into batshit land over the last 30 years. I actually miss Republicans from the 70s…they were more liberal than the average Democrat today. I’d love to see a GOP drive hand in hand with the Sierra Club to strengthen the EPA…but those days are gone. The Ronny RayGun Nazi’s took over…and we’ve been on a downhill slide ever since.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_UQFTKAFTLDZJ2PFFGQINTQK4ZY Sasha K

      You can’t blame the market for not fixing things, when we don’t have a free market. Look at the housing collapse: government worked to promote the bubble in every way, quasi-Federal Fannie Mae INVENTED CDOs, and the bankers were working under the (true) assumption they would be bailed out.

      How can you blame the free market for it?

      The same is true in just about every other broken area of America.

  • 5by5

    No, he’s not mainstream, he’s just an old school Republican in a party that’s turned into a giant bucket of crazy. So by comparison, Ron Paul looks rational.

    And on some issues, he is (the Fed, Iraq, the surveillance state). On others, not so much (civil rights, helping the poor, and he believes the market actually fixes things, which I think it’s wicked clear it does not).

    But he’s not 100% wrong like a Michelle Bachmann, or creepy like Mitch “Meltface” McConnell, or weepy like the Boehner.

    So like I said, by comparison, he comes off looking better.

    And yes, it is a joy to see the dimwits at Redstate get their panties in a bunch over someone in their party saying something rational.

  • http://voxmagi-necessarywords.blogspot.com/ VoxMagi

    Too true. The guy is sane by default…because the rest of his party drove over the cliff and crashed into batshit land over the last 30 years. I actually miss Republicans from the 70s…they were more liberal than the average Democrat today. I’d love to see a GOP drive hand in hand with the Sierra Club to strengthen the EPA…but those days are gone. The Ronny RayGun Nazi’s took over…and we’ve been on a downhill slide ever since.

  • http://voxmagi-necessarywords.blogspot.com/ VoxMagi

    Agreed. Technically, the Gold standard would work great…if we’d never left it…but moving back to that from where we are now would be a seismic event that would make Katrina and Pompeii and all other disasters look like picnics.

  • marc

    With all due respect, I feel you are speaking out of ignorance. Ron Paul has repeatedly criticized his own party for their socially conservative platform. He is pro gay marriage, anti-drug war, and unlike these tea party idiots, a true Libertarian.

  • Dan Mac

    It’s the deceitful monopoly creating crony capitalism we have now that is leading to corporate feudalism–not free market. We have never had a truly libertarian free market. Of course, such a thing would have to have laws–to protect it against governmental policies that undermine true freedom. It’s when corporate representatives worm their way into government, and write policy that benefits them at the expense of individuals that we end up where we are. Living under the oppression of a conglomeration of cartels in partnership with a supposedly independent government.

  • Dan Mac

    Do you have anything legitimate to back up anything you’ve stated here? Any evidence? Your statement, based on all the evidence I have carefully studied, appears to be the exact opposite of truth.

  • Dan Mac

    Liam, Vox, while you clearly have very intelligent conversations, on this point I am certain You have it backwards. The Federal Reserve System was designed by representatives of the international banking cartel–for the dual purpose of funneling the nation’s wealth into their own hands–and to place themselves into position for a gradual coup d’etat. It has been nearly one hundred years since the fed’s creation–and now the plan is nearly complete. The Fed, after it creation in 1913, has overseen the crash of 1929, the Great Depression of the thirties, the elimination of gold, silver, or any tangible thing to back up its “notes,” the resulting inflation of prices on everything–as the value of their fiat money depreciates every time they print more–out of thin air–watering down the economic soup of the nation–charging “we the people” interest for debt that they created–money they lend us, which they just print. The Federal Reserve System is the biggest scam in the history of the world.

    Please, folks: if you think you know anything about the fed, take a second look, an alternative look:

    http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-8484911570371055528#

    Then get back to me.

    Thank you

  • Dan Mac

    The only differences between the Federal Reserve System and petty counterfeiters:

    The so-called “Fed” produces counterfeit by the trillions.

    The Fed got their operation legalized and enforced by the government.

    The Fed has used one hundred years of brilliant deception–disinformation–education–to get the vast majority of people to believe it is a good thing. They have re-written the universities’ text books.

  • Dan Mac

    The only differences between the Federal Reserve System and petty counterfeiters:

    The so-called “Fed” produces counterfeit by the trillions.

    The Fed got their operation legalized and enforced by the government.

    The Fed has used one hundred years of brilliant deception–disinformation–education–to get the vast majority of people to believe it is a good thing. They have re-written the universities’ text books.

  • Hadrian999

    i agree but under true libertarianism there would be nothing to stop the powerful from entrenching themselves weather it be by controlling government, resources, infrastructure or with hired guns.

  • Dan Mac

    Good point–but it would still be better than what we have, by far. Long ago it was grain. It has been beans, too. But we all know what beans are worth…beans. At least they are stable. Script was working very well in colonial America–until a tyrannical government, pushed by the banksters, outlawed it. So, what shall we use? What can back our notes? There must be a measurement of energy….

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_UQFTKAFTLDZJ2PFFGQINTQK4ZY Sasha K

    Posting links without comment or considering their trustworthiness is the same as simply posting “I have no thoughts of my own.”

    We’ve all read that article. And, to the extent that it tries to paint Ron Paul as a racist, it’s BS.

    “Look at this fucking racist. Wants to end the apartheid war on drugs and let all the young black men out of prison. Might as well be wearing a KKK hood.”

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_UQFTKAFTLDZJ2PFFGQINTQK4ZY Sasha K

    Many libertarians, particularly of the popular Murray Rothbard camp that Ron Paul is very influenced by, support totally ending the institution of the corporation altogether. Business is wonderful and crucially important, but the corporation, where individuals are protected from liability but are able to responsibility but can keep all the profits, is a broken and logically inconsistent organization.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_UQFTKAFTLDZJ2PFFGQINTQK4ZY Sasha K

    He doesn’t support a gold standard, per se – he supports a system of competing currencies, where different currencies would be used for different purposes. He argues that in such a system, gold backed currencies would rise to prominence – but that’s different from a single “gold standard” dollar.

    In this way, the people would have the power to affect a currency that became debased or associated with corruption, but refusing to use it.

    “The public will have truly ZERO ability to oversee the creation of commercial money (which, admittedly is only marginally worse than the situation we have now).” Correction: that exactly IS the system we have now.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_UQFTKAFTLDZJ2PFFGQINTQK4ZY Sasha K

    You can’t blame the market for not fixing things, when we don’t have a free market. Look at the housing collapse: government worked to promote the bubble in every way, quasi-Federal Fannie Mae INVENTED CDOs, and the bankers were working under the (true) assumption they would be bailed out.

    How can you blame the free market for it?

    The same is true in just about every other broken area of America.

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