You Are What You Read: Sarah Palin

CS_Lewis_SignatureThe Wall Street Journal curiously allows Christian film company Walden Media’s president and co-founder Micheal Flaherty to write an article in defense of Sarah Palin’s newfound love of the novels of C.S. Lewis, some of which Walden has adapted into the Chronicles of Narnia series of movies. Well actually it’s not curious at all because the Journal is a division of Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp, which not so coincidentally owns 20th Century Fox Films, distributor of the latest Narnia movie, The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. Not that you’d know that unless you did the research for yourself, because there is no such disclosure at the head or tail of the article, sampled below:

Since Katie Couric first asked the question a couple of years back, journalists continue to pepper Sarah Palin with that classic ice-breaker: “So, what are you reading?” The subject came up again in a recent profile in the New York Times Magazine, and last week Barbara Walters returned to the question in interviewing Mrs. Palin as one of her “10 most fascinating people of 2010.”

In both interviews Mrs. Palin cited C.S. Lewis as a favorite author she looks to for inspiration. This prompted talk-show host and comedienne Joy Behar of “The View” to deride Mrs. Palin and her choice of reading, asking: “Aren’t those children’s books?”

Lewis would likely have appreciated making Mrs. Palin’s reading list. But he probably would have appreciated the questions about it even more. For Lewis, one of the best ways to know a person was to know what they read. He was convinced that books defined us and shaped our character. He realized that books did more than prepare people for interesting conversations with journalists—they prepare us to respond to the crises we encounter in our own lives.

Lewis explored the life-changing power of stories by writing one of his own, “The Voyage of the Dawn Treader,” one of the seven books in “The Chronicles of Narnia.” One of the key themes of this book is the old maxim—”You are what you read.” He begins “The Voyage of the Dawn Treader” with one of the most memorable lines in the series: “There once was a boy named Eustace Clarence Scrubb, and he almost deserved it.”

Eustace, Lewis tells us, “liked books if they were books of information and had pictures of grain elevators or of fat foreign children doing exercises in model schools.” In other words, Eustace didn’t have time for the types of stories that Lewis wrote and thought were important—stories about “brave knights and heroic courage.”…

[continues in the Wall Street Journal]

, , , , , , ,

  • Andrew

    “Nor am I greatly moved by the fact that many of the individuals we strike down in war are innocent. That seems, in a way, to make war not worse but better. That two soldiers on opposite sides, each believing his own country to be in the right, each at the moment when his selfishness is most in abeyance and his will to sacrifice in the ascendant, should kill each other in plain battle seems to me by no means one of the most terrible things in this very terrible world.” — C. S. Lewis

  • Andrew

    “Nor am I greatly moved by the fact that many of the individuals we strike down in war are innocent. That seems, in a way, to make war not worse but better. That two soldiers on opposite sides, each believing his own country to be in the right, each at the moment when his selfishness is most in abeyance and his will to sacrifice in the ascendant, should kill each other in plain battle seems to me by no means one of the most terrible things in this very terrible world.” — C. S. Lewis

  • Will

    Maybe she should read and listen to EDWIN STARR
    “War”
    War, huh, yeah
    What is it good for
    Absolutely nothing
    Uh-huh
    War, huh, yeah
    What is it good for
    Absolutely nothing
    Say it again, y’all

  • Will

    Maybe she should read and listen to EDWIN STARR
    “War”
    War, huh, yeah
    What is it good for
    Absolutely nothing
    Uh-huh
    War, huh, yeah
    What is it good for
    Absolutely nothing
    Say it again, y’all

    • dirty johnny

      Wow. That’s deep.

  • dirty johnny

    Wow. That’s deep.

21
More in Books, C. S. Lewis, Media, Movies, Narnia, News Corporation, Rupert Murdoch
How the Rise of the Information War Gave Birth to a New Digital Culture

What happened? For the past few years I've been nailing the death of the Internet into the coffin. I recently posted about The Death of Memetics and was all but...

Close