Neuromarketing Invades Movies

greatest movieHollywood’s hippest executives and filmmakers have been shuttling back and forth to Park City, Utah this week for the top U.S. film festival, Sundance. One of the more interesting films debuting is Morgan Spurlock’s The Greatest Movie Ever Sold, which he financed entirely with product placement and sponsorship money. In this interview with Jeff Sneider for The Wrap he discusses how neuromarketing works:

The Wrap: The thing that I found most fascinating was the neuromarketing stuff.

Spurlock: Amazing, right?

Yes, it was very interesting. Do you feel like that’s the future of marketing, and if so, does that worry you?

You have to think that if you can get to the point where you know that a mass of people, if you do X, Y and Z in a trailer, will want to go see that movie, or in a commercial, will make them want to go buy that thing or make them crave it in some way … it’s a crazy thing to think about. It’s a pretty insane, “Brave New World”-ish, futuristic way to look [at things]. I’m basically going to be able to know what you want. It’s like pre-cog advertising.

What do you think will be the next evolution in product placement? Where is it going?

I think the evolution is going to be a de-evolution. I think what will happen is, you’ll see things get flipped back to almost how it was in the glory days, the early days of radio and TV. I think you’re going to see brands who are going to be giving money to artists and creative people, saying ‘I love what you do. Here’s money. Go do what you do and just let us be associated with it.’

I think you’ll still have ‘hold on a second, let me get out my AT&T Blackberry.’ I think stuff like that will still happen, but I think it’s going to start to diminish because I think that the brands that empower artists and empower creative people are going to be the ones that really look great.

In the film, you bring up “Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle” as an example of product placement in movies. Having done “Super Size Me,” do you think we’re going to eventually see a McDonald’s movie where Ronald McDonald and Grimace and the others go on a big screen adventure?

Well, did you ever see “Mac and Me?” Years ago, there was this film paid for by McDonald’s, about an alien that loved to eat there. It was one of the worst things you’ll ever see.

Again, what these companies need to do is they need to let the creative people be creative. The thing that’s interesting to me is, it also makes you wonder … as you see artists like OK Go who make all these amazing music videos that are brought to you by brands — you saw the stuff that we created in this film just by working with those companies — I think there will be some companies that question the need for agencies.

Going down the road, when you start to understand what your brand personality is, as they say in the movie … once you understand what your brand identity is and what you want to do to market that, couldn’t we go right to artists without having an agency do that?…

[continues at The Wrap]

, , , , ,

  • Pingback: Tweets that mention Neuromarketing Invades Movies | Disinformation -- Topsy.com()

  • Ironaddict06

    The bigest area of product placement will be in T.V. sitcoms. With the invention of T-VO, that allows people to skip commericals, product placement is the only logical choice.

    • http://voxmagi-necessarywords.blogspot.com/ VoxMagi

      I still believe the day will come when Congress mandates a ‘minimum advertising exposure’ law, requiring people to receive a pre set amount of advertising or face penalties/sanctions.

    • Simiantongue

      The only TV I watch these days is a show called Fringe, It’s only for the one character Walter whom I find very entertaining. But to the point. I noticed right away in the show how they do product placement. You’ll notice if you watch the show how the commercial breaks are noticeably shorter also.

      For example I was watching an episode where the main characters Dunham and Peter jumped in their Ford whatever, During the trip they were dialoging, developing the story, then suddenly Dunham decided to make a call. She uses the onboard voice activated phone in the SUV while they gave a long pan of the dashboard and controls here and Peter were playing with. Ultimately the call and dashboard scenes had nothing to do with the show, I realized I had just seen a commercial for the type of ford they were driving which, which also got somewhat of a workout chasing the bad guys too lol.

      The vehicle and its options, which Dunham mentioned in passing were clearly written into the show. A little ham handed too, I’m sure they’ll get better at it.

  • Ironaddict06

    The bigest area of product placement will be in T.V. sitcoms. With the invention of T-VO, that allows people to skip commericals, product placement is the only logical choice.

  • http://voxmagi-necessarywords.blogspot.com/ VoxMagi

    I still believe the day will come when Congress mandates a ‘minimum advertising exposure’ law, requiring people to receive a pre set amount of advertising or face penalties/sanctions.

  • http://www.nickmeador.org/ ndmeador

    I totally used to have “Mac and Me” on VHS. And it WAS a terrible movie. But I had no idea that McDonald’s funded it (I don’t remember that being in the movie at all). That’s the strength of subliminal messaging, I guess.

  • http://www.nickmeador.org/ ndmeador

    I totally used to have “Mac and Me” on VHS. And it WAS a terrible movie. But I had no idea that McDonald’s funded it (I don’t remember that being in the movie at all). That’s the strength of subliminal messaging, I guess.

  • WhiteRose

    Fast food sells because it’s cheap and easy and that is the American way… no product placement needed!

  • WhiteRose

    Fast food sells because it’s cheap and easy and that is the American way… no product placement needed!

  • Rose Marie Barrientos

    An artist created company (see note below) was based on a similar concept. Any relation or is this just a coincidence?
    Check out their site http://www.acclair.co.uk/about/

    (ACCLAIR is one of the “critical company” cited on the publication bearing the same title
    – “Les entreprises critiques”, by Yann Toma and Rose Marie Barrientos, Coedited by CERAP, Cite du design, Advancia/Negocia, Paris, 2008.)

  • Rose Marie Barrientos

    An artist created company (see note below) was based on a similar concept. Any relation or is this just a coincidence?
    Check out their site http://www.acclair.co.uk/about/

    (ACCLAIR is one of the “critical company” cited on the publication bearing the same title
    – “Les entreprises critiques”, by Yann Toma and Rose Marie Barrientos, Coedited by CERAP, Cite du design, Advancia/Negocia, Paris, 2008.)

  • Simiantongue

    The only TV I watch these days is a show called Fringe, It’s only for the one character Walter whom I find very entertaining. But to the point. I noticed right away in the show how they do product placement. You’ll notice if you watch the show how the commercial breaks are noticeably shorter also.

    For example I was watching an episode where the main characters Dunham and Peter jumped in their Ford whatever, During the trip they were dialoging, developing the story, then suddenly Dunham decided to make a call. She uses the onboard voice activated phone in the SUV while they gave a long pan of the dashboard and controls here and Peter were playing with. Ultimately the call and dashboard scenes had nothing to do with the show, I realized I had just seen a commercial for the type of ford they were driving which, which also got somewhat of a workout chasing the bad guys too lol.

    The vehicle and its options, which Dunham mentioned in passing were clearly written into the show. A little ham handed too, I’m sure they’ll get better at it.

21