How a Slap Sparked Tunisia’s Revolution … And Perhaps For the Entire Middle East (Video)

TunisiaWhile Libya now, and Egypt not too long ago, are/were dominating the news cycle, 60 Minutes had a recent piece on what happened in Tunisia before these events. The most amazing part of this video to me, is in Tunisia, some young people who were part of the protest movement are now part of the new government. Bob Simon of 60 Minutes reports:

The wave of revolutions sweeping the Arab world started in a forgotten town in the flatlands of Tunisia. It was an unlikely place for history to be made. But so was Tunisia itself, the smallest country in North Africa, strategically irrelevant, with no oil and not much of an army.

It has been an oasis of tranquility in this tumultuous part of the world, famous for its beaches, its couscous and its wonderful weather. But there was a dark side to paradise: for 23 years, Tunisia was ruled by a corrupt and ruthless dictator named Zine Ben Ali, who filled his prisons with anyone who spoke out against him.

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  • George M. Anderson

    The Revolution will Not Be Televised, but it will be on Facebook…

  • Saint Dharma

    The Revolution will Not Be Televised, but it will be on Facebook…

  • Francoistremblay28

    Why is that amazing? The best way to stop a revolution dead in its tracks is to give its leaders political power.

    • ralph

      Because of the speed of it happened, a matter of weeks. The last time this happened in America was in the 18th century and it took years. Nowadays in America, it’s very rare from someone to go from being an activist to being in a position of political power at the national level in a short amount of time.

      • Francoistremblay28

        I think you missed a few revolutions. What about the French Revolution of 1968? I’m pretty sure the exact same thing happened.

        • ralph

          I was reflecting on America, nevertheless, still think the events in Tunisia were/are extraordinary and actually the protesting hasn’t stopped there, a major difference is now former activists have the day-to-day reality of governing.

          However, feel free to name as many revolutions around the world as you’d like to make your point, which I’m still not sure what it is …

          • Francoistremblay28

            … that activists given power to shut them up is a common phenomenon?

          • ralph

            Thanks for clarifying, I don’t necessarily agree with that sentiment in this case. When we talking about “revolution” in my mind, it’s the establishment of a new political system, which Tunisia appears in process of doing. Perhaps something like you’re describing is what will happen in Egypt … I’m not sure how that is going to play out.

          • Francoistremblay28

            Well now you’re splitting hairs. All revolutions establish a new political system. But not necessarily a new government. Anyway, I’m done with this discussion, I think we went through all the important points.

  • Francoistremblay28

    Why is that amazing? The best way to stop a revolution dead in its tracks is to give its leaders political power.

  • http://disinfo.com ralph

    Because of the speed of it happened, a matter of weeks. The last time this happened in America was in the 18th century and it took years. Nowadays in America, it’s very rare from someone to go from being an activist to being in a position of political power at the national level in a short amount of time.

  • Francoistremblay28

    I think you missed a few revolutions. What about the French Revolution of 1968? I’m pretty sure the exact same thing happened.

  • http://disinfo.com ralph

    I was reflecting on America, nevertheless, still think the events in Tunisia were/are extraordinary and actually the protesting hasn’t stopped there, a major difference is now former activists have the day-to-day reality of governing.

    However, feel free to name as many revolutions around the world as you’d like to make your point, which I’m still not sure what it is …

  • Francoistremblay28

    … that activists given power to shut them up is a common phenomenon?

  • http://disinfo.com ralph

    Thanks for clarifying, I don’t necessarily agree with that sentiment in this case. When we talking about “revolution” in my mind, it’s the establishment of a new political system, which Tunisia appears in process of doing. Perhaps something like you’re describing is what will happen in Egypt … I’m not sure how that is going to play out.

  • Francoistremblay28

    Well now you’re splitting hairs. All revolutions establish a new political system. But not necessarily a new government. Anyway, I’m done with this discussion, I think we went through all the important points.

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