Mona Lisa Is Painting Of Da Vinci’s Gay Lover, Italian Researcher Claims

156-1258703207Is the most beautiful and iconic woman in the history of art actually a man? When one compares the Mona Lisa to other works in question (see right), the facial similarities are striking. The Washington Post reports on the controversial theory:

A male apprentice, longtime companion and possible lover of Leonardo da Vinci was the main influence and a model for the “Mona Lisa” painting, an Italian researcher said.

But the researcher, Silvano Vinceti, said Wednesday the portrait also represents a synthesis of Leonardo’s scientific, artistic and philosophical beliefs. Because the artist worked on it at various intervals for many years, he was subjected to different influences and sources of inspiration, and the canvas is full of hidden symbolic meanings. “The ‘Mona Lisa’ must be read at various levels, not just as a portrait,” Vinceti said.

The apprentice Gian Giacomo Caprotti, known as Salai, worked with Leonardo for more than two decades starting in 1490. Vinceti described their relationship as “ambiguous,” and most art historians agree Salai was a Leonardo lover.

Several Leonardo works, including “St. John the Baptist” and a lesser-known drawing called “Angel Incarnate,” were based on Salai, Vinceti told a news conference at the Foreign Press Association. These paintings show a slender, effeminate young man with long auburn curls. Vinceti said similarities with the “Mona Lisa’s” nose and mouth are striking.

, , , , ,

  • chubby

    The shroud of turin, now this? haha WAR DAVINCI

  • chubby

    The shroud of turin, now this? haha WAR DAVINCI

  • Pingback: Tweets that mention Mona Lisa Is Painting Of Da Vinci’s Gay Lover, Italian Researcher Claims | Disinformation -- Topsy.com()

  • Liam_McGonagle

    Well, “De Gustibus Non Disputandum Est” and all that, but frankly I never found the Mona Lisa all that fantastically beautiful. Guess I prefer redheads.

    Yeah I get the fact that it’s considered a watershed moment in the depiction of photorealistic light/shade dynamics in what had been until then a two dimensional iconic space. And that’s not un-important. But it is swimming against the current, so to speak, with contemporary artists practically stepping over their own nuts to create some type of intentionally non-realistic heightened reality through use of abstract techniques.

    And the DaVinci being gay thing is old news. It should hardly have surprised anyone. After all, who was statistically more likely to make the spectacular new breakthroughs in Renaissance culture–the outsider forced further into esoterica by the intolerance of a stupidly uncomprehending Catholic Taliban, or the plastic wonk returning every day to the wife his parents chose for him when he was 13?

    • E.B. Wolf

      Like due to redheads comment.

  • Liam_McGonagle

    Well, “De Gustibus Non Disputandum Est” and all that, but frankly I never found the Mona Lisa all that fantastically beautiful. Guess I prefer redheads.

    Yeah I get the fact that it’s considered a watershed moment in the depiction of photorealistic light/shade dynamics in what had been until then a two dimensional iconic space. And that’s not un-important. But it is swimming against the current, so to speak, with contemporary artists practically stepping over their own nuts to create some type of intentionally non-realistic heightened reality through use of abstract techniques.

    And the DaVinci being gay thing is old news. It should hardly have surprised anyone. After all, who was statistically more likely to make the spectacular new breakthroughs in Renaissance culture–the outsider forced further into esoterica by the intolerance of a stupidly uncomprehending Catholic Taliban, or the plastic wonk returning every day to the wife his parents chose for him when he was 13?

  • E.B. Wolf

    Like due to redheads comment.

  • sgtdoom

    Generally speaking, I don’t like posting at this site as they have been known to censor, but this is truly a post of sloppy and zero scholarship, and no one gives a rat’s ass what several Gay art historians want to foist on anyone.

    Salai was most likely Leonardo’s illegitimate son, since due to the social mores at that time, individuals such as Leonardo (who was a bastard, or born outside of marriage) weren’t allowed to legally marry, and due to that fact only three occupations were legally open to Leonardo: pharmacist (travelling physician), sculptor and artist or artisan.

    Leonardo first visited the town where Salai was born approximately 17 years before (he was around 17 when Leo first met up with him) when Da Vinci had been visiting there, and made his famous series of sketches which included a number of attractive young ladies, including Salai’s mother.

    The relationship was ambiguous as Salai was Leonardo’s son, of the long-lost variety.

  • Anonymous

    Generally speaking, I don’t like posting at this site as they have been known to censor, but this is truly a post of sloppy and zero scholarship, and no one gives a rat’s ass what several Gay art historians want to foist on anyone.

    Salai was most likely Leonardo’s illegitimate son, since due to the social mores at that time, individuals such as Leonardo (who was a bastard, or born outside of marriage) weren’t allowed to legally marry, and due to that fact only three occupations were legally open to Leonardo: pharmacist (travelling physician), sculptor and artist or artisan.

    Leonardo first visited the town where Salai was born approximately 17 years before (he was around 17 when Leo first met up with him) when Da Vinci had been visiting there, and made his famous series of sketches which included a number of attractive young ladies, including Salai’s mother.

    The relationship was ambiguous as Salai was Leonardo’s son, of the long-lost variety.

  • WhiteRose

    I don’t know how any man puts up with us women…

  • WhiteRose

    I don’t know how any man puts up with us women…

21