More Than Half Of America’s Pets Are Obese

Screen shot 2011-02-23 at 8.23.50 AMThe obesity epidemic is spreading from man to man’s best friend — in America at least. The Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP) reports that:

Obesity continues to expand in both pets and people according to the latest pet obesity study. The fourth annual Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP) National Pet Obesity Awareness Day Study found approximately 53% of cats and 55% of dogs were overweight or obese. Preliminary data released from a nationwide collaboration with Banfield, the nation’s largest chain of veterinary clinics, reveals pet obesity continues to be a serious problem. APOP founder Dr. Ernie Ward remarks, “This year’s data suggests that our pets are getting fatter. We’re seeing a greater percentage of obese pets than ever before.”

32% of cats in the preliminary sample were classified as overweight by their veterinarian and 21.6% were observed to be clinically obese or greater than 30% of normal body weight. 35% of dogs were found to be overweight and 20.6% obese. “While the general trend of overweight pets has remained fairly steady at around 50%, the number of obese pets is growing. This is troubling because it means more pets will be affected by weight-related diseases such as arthritis, diabetes, high blood pressure and kidney disease costing pet owners millions in avoidable medical costs.”

The group began conducting nationwide veterinary surveys in 2007 and has seen a steady increase in the percentage of pets classified as obese or at least 30% above normal body weight. In 2007, roughly 19% of cats were found to be obese by their veterinarian and in 2010 that number increased to almost 22%. For dogs, obesity rates escalated from just over 10% in 2007 to 20% in 2010. “One of the reasons we think the obesity rate for dogs has dramatically increased is due to a better understanding of what an obese dog looks like. Veterinarians also realize how critical it is to tell a pet owner when their dog is in danger due to its weight.” comments Ward…

[continues at The Association for Pet Obesity Prevention site]

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  • http://hormeticminds.blogspot.com/ Chaorder Gradient

    I’d say that statistic is pretty accurate, one of my 2 cats is a fatty.

  • http://hormeticminds.blogspot.com/ Chaorder Gradient

    I’d say that statistic is pretty accurate, one of my 2 cats is a fatty.

  • justagirl

    my cat will eat anything with a tiny heartbeat. it keeps her fit. she eats the tops and tries to leave the bottoms for me. LOL! i love her.

  • justagirl

    my cat will eat anything with a tiny heartbeat. it keeps her fit. she eats the tops and tries to leave the bottoms for me. LOL! i love her.

  • GoodDoktorBad

    Mario says: “I like my pussy(cat) with some meat on it. Juicy!”

  • Anonymous

    Mario says: “I like my pussy(cat) with some meat on it. Juicy!”

  • Anonymous

    Mario says: “I like my pussy(cat) with some meat on it. Juicy!”

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