• MoralDrift

    The contrast could not be starker

  • Anonymous

    The contrast could not be starker

  • Plaguebubonics

    That was a good interview with Zizek.

  • Plaguebubonics

    That was a good interview with Zizek.

  • Godozo

    How about a picture of Muslims circling around a Christian Church so as to protect it in comparison to one of the Chaldean churches in Iraq after it was bombed by a suicide bomber. I would hope that such pictures exist, and show an equally stark difference.

    • Fiver

      I don’t think you’ll ever find that picture. I may be wrong, but I expect the Copts are terrified that things are about to go from bad to worse.

      • quartz99

        actually, I’ve been seeing pictures of Christians linking hands around a group of Muslims to protect them from Mubarrak’s thugs while they’re praying, and I haven’t seen a picture, but did see reports, of the reverse. The thing that makes this revolution so different from the riots elsewhere in the Middle East is that this one is made up of a very diverse group of citizens, who all see themselves as fellow citizens first, and their religion second.

      • Godozo

        Maybe in the future, but for now the kids are alright:

        http://www.churchtimes.co.uk/content.asp?id=107517

  • Godozo

    How about a picture of Muslims circling around a Christian Church so as to protect it in comparison to one of the Chaldean churches in Iraq after it was bombed by a suicide bomber. I would hope that such pictures exist, and show an equally stark difference.

  • Hadrian999

    it will be a real democratic revolution if it is followed by real democracy, that remains to be seen.
    most revolutions just swap out one dictator or ruling class for another.

    • Historyisserious

      incorrect. if it fails to be followed by a democracy, it is a failed democratic revolution. even if Iraq ends in a democracy (which it will not), it was never a democratic revolution to begin with; it simply would have democratic results.

  • Hadrian999

    it will be a real democratic revolution if it is followed by real democracy, that remains to be seen.
    most revolutions just swap out one dictator or ruling class for another.

  • hunter349

    The thing that is not talked about much is the inequality difference pushing the revolutions. Somewhere around 3/4 of all Egyptians live on less than $2 a day. Do we consider Egypt a 3rd word country? No, because we see how some are doing well and ignore the masses who suffer. After a while the masses get tired of suffering.

    Economic equality is pretty much a bad phase in many countries. The countries that hate the phrase are generally the most unequal in terms of living standards. In the U.S. 1% of the population owns 40% of the countries wealth, the top 10% own over 70% of the countries wealth. That leaves 30% for the remaining 90% of the population. I’m not saying that we are on the verge of any kind of revolution here but we would be wise to understand that it is not so much poverty but poverty while surrounded by wealth that enrages people the most.

  • Anonymous

    The thing that is not talked about much is the inequality difference pushing the revolutions. Somewhere around 3/4 of all Egyptians live on less than $2 a day. Do we consider Egypt a 3rd word country? No, because we see how some are doing well and ignore the masses who suffer. After a while the masses get tired of suffering.

    Economic equality is pretty much a bad phase in many countries. The countries that hate the phrase are generally the most unequal in terms of living standards. In the U.S. 1% of the population owns 40% of the countries wealth, the top 10% own over 70% of the countries wealth. That leaves 30% for the remaining 90% of the population. I’m not saying that we are on the verge of any kind of revolution here but we would be wise to understand that it is not so much poverty but poverty while surrounded by wealth that enrages people the most.

  • Fiver

    I don’t think you’ll ever find that picture. I may be wrong, but I expect the Copts are terrified that things are about to go from bad to worse.

  • Haystack

    It really exposes US hypocrisy that we’ve been preaching democracy for years to the two countries we’ve invaded, but when there’s real promise of it happening peacefully in Egypt, we can only talk about how it will effect US/Israeli interests.

  • Haystack

    It really exposes US hypocrisy that we’ve been preaching democracy for years to the two countries we’ve invaded, but when there’s real promise of it happening peacefully in Egypt, we can only talk about how it will effect US/Israeli interests.

  • Anonymous

    actually, I’ve been seeing pictures of Christians linking hands around a group of Muslims to protect them from Mubarrak’s thugs while they’re praying, and I haven’t seen a picture, but did see reports, of the reverse. The thing that makes this revolution so different from the riots elsewhere in the Middle East is that this one is made up of a very diverse group of citizens, who all see themselves as fellow citizens first, and their religion second.

  • 5by5

    The difference between grassroots and astroturf writ large….

  • 5by5

    The difference between grassroots and astroturf writ large….

  • MJV

    What Hadrian999 has said is truth, revolution gives way to more tyranny because it is based in a power structure that is already failing in the first place. After all, the word revolution does imply a circle (ov repetition maybe?).

  • MJV

    What Hadrian999 has said is truth, revolution gives way to more tyranny because it is based in a power structure that is already failing in the first place. After all, the word revolution does imply a circle (ov repetition maybe?).

  • Godozo

    Maybe in the future, but for now the kids are alright:

    http://www.churchtimes.co.uk/content.asp?id=107517

  • Dennis

    Screw democracy, they progress to a stateless society. A democracy would change nothing.

  • Dennis

    Screw democracy, they progress to a stateless society. A democracy would change nothing.

    • Blathmac

      Quite the contrary, the state appeared because of the human society’s progress. Don’t be an obscurantist with your “back to the primitive” ideas.

      • Thom

        State societies centralize power as a trend. Centralized power systems promote their own longevity; the ruling class is there to propagate the power of the state. Basically they end up putting themselves above the people because of exploitation. It’s a technical issue of the system. Stateless societies that fix this issue are hardly primitive.

  • Historyisserious

    incorrect. if it fails to be followed by a democracy, it is a failed democratic revolution. even if Iraq ends in a democracy (which it will not), it was never a democratic revolution to begin with; it simply would have democratic results.

  • Blathmac

    Quite the contrary, the state appeared because of the human society’s progress. Don’t be an obscurantist with your “back to the primitive” ideas.

  • Blathmac

    Slavoj? Where I can read it?

  • Plaguebubonics
  • http://mish-mashofbuzz-words.blogspot.com Slunkmonky

    I love this but I have to play devil’s advocate for a second. In left photo those people were ready to start a war and all came out to express that. On the other hand, the people on the right may (I say may) not be so populous because a war they didn’t want was coming to them and they stayed home to protect their families. The comparison is not apples to apples,, but nonetheless, great job.

  • http://mish-mashofbuzz-words.blogspot.com Slunkmonky

    I love this but I have to play devil’s advocate for a second. In left photo those people were ready to start a war and all came out to express that. On the other hand, the people on the right may (I say may) not be so populous because a war they didn’t want was coming to them and they stayed home to protect their families. The comparison is not apples to apples,, but nonetheless, great job.

  • cathybettoney

    Our director of regulatory, who is a lady Egyptian engineer, says that Gamal was corrupt. She was not sorry to see him go for that reason, and also because she’d like a democracy in Egypt, not a hereditary monarchy.

  • Anonymous

    Our director of regulatory, who is a lady Egyptian engineer, says that Gamal was corrupt. She was not sorry to see him go for that reason, and also because she’d like a democracy in Egypt, not a hereditary monarchy.

  • Thom

    State societies centralize power as a trend. Centralized power systems promote their own longevity; the ruling class is there to propagate the power of the state. Basically they end up putting themselves above the people because of exploitation. It’s a technical issue of the system. Stateless societies that fix this issue are hardly primitive.

  • http://profiles.google.com/zfolwick Zachary Folwick

    That’s a very misleading picture montage and I hope it doesn’t need to be explained why…

  • http://profiles.google.com/zfolwick Zachary Folwick

    That’s a very misleading picture montage and I hope it doesn’t need to be explained why…

  • http://profiles.google.com/zfolwick Zachary Folwick

    That’s a very misleading picture montage and I hope it doesn’t need to be explained why…

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