U.S. Feral Pig Problem Spreading

Please spare me your police jokes … Fox News reports:

War is being waged right now across the country — against huge, ever-growing packs of feral pigs that are running rampant, destroying crops, killing wildlife and spreading disease everywhere they go, the U.S. Department of Agriculture reports.

They’ve been spotted all the way from Texas to California to Michigan and in New York.

“It’s estimated there are at least 4 million of them nationwide, but its impossible to count them all so there may be much more” said Carol Bannerman, a spokesman for the USDA Wildlife Services.

Officials say they cause more than $8 million worth of damage every year. “That amount doesn’t include impact to the natural environment and native species, or to water” Bannerman said. One disease humans can get, she said, by coming in contact with the beasts bodily fluids is called “swine brucellosis,” and is extremely painful.

Historians think the hogs were first brought by explorers to this country from Spain in the late 1500s. The boars bred and spread — and have chomped their way across the country ever since, devouring crops and small livestock.

For more information, see original article.

22 Comments on "U.S. Feral Pig Problem Spreading"

  1. Hadrian999 | Feb 10, 2011 at 5:41 am |

    when do they get to IL

  2. Hadrian999 | Feb 10, 2011 at 1:41 am |

    when do they get to IL

  3. Butter Knife | Feb 10, 2011 at 7:28 am |

    Historians know full well that the Spanish brought them, as did the French, English, Dutch, Portuguese and every other European colonist. Pigs aren’t native to the Americas.

    Of course, precisely when they were introduced is irrelevant… domestic pigs, like domestic cats, are quite capable of going feral withing months of release or escape into the wild. They are voracious and opportunistic predators, extremely tough and large enough to compete as apex predators in most ecosystems.

    There may be a current spike in the number of feral pigs, but this has been a known, well-established problem for centuries.

  4. Butter Knife | Feb 10, 2011 at 3:28 am |

    Historians know full well that the Spanish brought them, as did the French, English, Dutch, Portuguese and every other European colonist. Pigs aren’t native to the Americas.

    Of course, precisely when they were introduced is irrelevant… domestic pigs, like domestic cats, are quite capable of going feral withing months of release or escape into the wild. They are voracious and opportunistic predators, extremely tough and large enough to compete as apex predators in most ecosystems.

    There may be a current spike in the number of feral pigs, but this has been a known, well-established problem for centuries.

  5. emperorreagan | Feb 10, 2011 at 1:35 pm |

    The only comments I would have to offer on this topic would be jokes about cops…

  6. emperorreagan | Feb 10, 2011 at 9:35 am |

    The only comments I would have to offer on this topic would be jokes about cops…

  7. Connie Dobbs | Feb 10, 2011 at 1:46 pm |

    I blame all those silly “find your inner caveman” books from the 90s. You can’t enjoy a girls night out without running into at least 3 or 4 feral pigs. (cop as pig is overplayed. Dude as pig, its coming back in a big way”.

  8. Connie Dobbs | Feb 10, 2011 at 9:46 am |

    I blame all those silly “find your inner caveman” books from the 90s. You can’t enjoy a girls night out without running into at least 3 or 4 feral pigs. (cop as pig is overplayed. Dude as pig, its coming back in a big way”.

  9. Anonymous | Feb 10, 2011 at 3:57 pm |

    If you stop behaving like a sow, perhaps the pigs will lose interest.

  10. Ronniedobbs | Feb 10, 2011 at 4:11 pm |

    yawn… this article is a boar….

  11. Ronniedobbs | Feb 10, 2011 at 12:11 pm |

    yawn… this article is a boar….

  12. PIG BOMB!!!
    Hogaggeddon!

    Seriously the first one was a Discovery network show, it was ridiculous.

  13. PIG BOMB!!!
    Hogaggeddon!

    Seriously the first one was a Discovery network show, it was ridiculous.

  14. justagirl | Feb 10, 2011 at 4:26 pm |

    WOAH! LOL! simmer down! lol.

  15. Anonymous | Feb 10, 2011 at 5:43 pm |

    Hissssss……..

  16. Nargilmon | Mar 9, 2011 at 2:43 pm |

    The big difference with pigs: the litter size. A deer, elk, bear, or even feral cows in some places have 1, maybe 2 offspring. Triplets are possible but I doubt many sets of triplets make it to adulthood. Pigs? 4, 5, maybe 7 or even 12 and I have heard as high as 16 but never seen that many. They also can function without momma at 6 months. That’s the reason pigs are such a problem. The good news? Our here in California I can hunt them 365, no closed season and unlimited tags. Organic, free range, and local pork. Doesn’t get better than that, huh.

  17. Nargilmon | Mar 9, 2011 at 10:43 am |

    The big difference with pigs: the litter size. A deer, elk, bear, or even feral cows in some places have 1, maybe 2 offspring. Triplets are possible but I doubt many sets of triplets make it to adulthood. Pigs? 4, 5, maybe 7 or even 12 and I have heard as high as 16 but never seen that many. They also can function without momma at 6 months. That’s the reason pigs are such a problem. The good news? Our here in California I can hunt them 365, no closed season and unlimited tags. Organic, free range, and local pork. Doesn’t get better than that, huh.

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