Frozen Flamingos Fall From The Sky In Siberia

_mg_1510NPR provides more wildlife-plummeting-from-the-heavens oddness to cap off a packed season. Going back at least a hundred years, solitary flamingos occasionally fall from the sky in the brutal Siberian winter, thousands of miles from the birds’ habitat:

The two boys ran over, called their father, Vasily, who picked up the bird and took it home. It was still alive. “[This is the ] first time I see a bird like this,” he told a TV reporter.

They fed the flamingo fish and buckwheat saturated in water (not normally flamingo food) and pretty soon it was up, active and knocking around the Muravyev’s apartment. Here it is, head in a feeding bucket.

That should be the end of the story. Except that one year later, also in November and also in Siberia, it happened again. Another flamingo flew out of the sky, landed by another Siberian river, was also brought to the greenhouse, then sent to the zoo and the locals began to wonder, “Where are these birds coming from? What are they doing here?”

November is the month when flamingos normally fly south from their nests in Kazakhstan to Iran. So, maybe this is an example of “reverse migration”, a behavior known in migrating birds but not – thus far — in flamingos.

Here’s the idea. Suppose a bird is wired to fly one direction every fall and for some reason the wiring screws up so the animal goes 180 degrees the wrong way, exactly the opposite direction. This happens to a few birds in migrant populations every year. The village of Vernemarkovo in Siberia, where the first bird landed, was roughly the opposite distance and the opposite direction from the flamingo’s normal winter quarters in Iran.

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  • Jordan

    The recent solar flare activity causing geomagnetic storms could have possibly messed with which direction the birds migrate.

  • Jordan

    The recent solar flare activity causing geomagnetic storms could have possibly messed with which direction the birds migrate.