Gold And Silver Currency May Be Legalized In U.S. States

1933 double eagle

U.S. 1933 Double Eagle Gold Coin

Anyone who’s been paying attention knows that the United States federal currency has been grossly devalued as the Federal Reserve has been printing paper dollars 24/7 to fund the “stimulus” that’s supposed to end the bleak recession we’ve been stuck in for the last three years (I know, officially it’s over, but tell that to the millions of un- and underemployed people scraping by).

One of the great things about American governance is that the individual states retain a lot of power, so many of them are taking matters into their own hands and planning a reversion to currency that really is worth something: gold and silver. Ralph Benko reports on the trend for the Christian Science Monitor:

Why are so many state legislators beginning to call for issuance of a form of gold money?

The Constitution prohibits states from coining money but allows them to make “gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts.” By prohibiting everything except “gold and silver Coin” the Constitution clearly considers gold and silver coinage to be legitimate, no matter who issues it.

States haven’t issued currency in any form for more than a hundred years. So why now? Disgust is probably the answer. Various state legislators are disgusted by the federal government’s promiscuous dollar-printing. Accordingly, legislators in a dozen states are contemplating legislation to issue gold or silver-based currencies, including Utah, South Carolina, Virginia and New Hampshire.

The transcript of the debates in the original Constitutional Convention shows that the attitude of the Founders toward paper money was one of contempt. One delegate, Roger Sherman, called for the insertion of an absolute prohibition against states issuing their own paper money.

Sherman’s argument prevailed, as the Founder’s decided that the states would not possess the power to “emit bills of credit, nor make any thing but gold and silver coin a tender in payment of debts” making these prohibitions absolute…

As for the federal government, the earliest drafts of the Constitution included language permitting the federal government to issue unbacked paper money. But this language would not survive the final draft.

Many of the Founders objected strongly to this power. The objections were summed up by delegate Oliver Ellsworth, who sought to “shut and bar the door against paper money.”

“Paper money can in no case be necessary,” Ellsworth argued, “The power [to issue it] may do harm, never good.”

Since most of the Founders agreed, the federal government was also denied the power to issue non-convertible paper money. The federal government mostly operated within these constraints – the main exception being the Civil War, when saving the Union took precedence over all other considerations.

But for most of American history, dollars have been convertible into gold or silver. It is a 20th century innovation to have non-convertible currency. In 1932, FDR denied US citizens the right to convert their dollars into gold by US citizens. Then, in 1971, Richard Nixon denied foreign central banks the right to convert their dollars into gold…

[continues in the Christian Science Monitor]

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  • Andrew

    Gold is better used as a conductor.

  • Andrew

    Gold is better used as a conductor.

    • http://twitter.com/pigle Valentine Sedlovsky

      now with all wireless graphite prevails.

  • Bud Bundy

    Gotta dump that gold before the value tanks.

  • Bud Bundy

    Gotta dump that gold before the value tanks.

  • Teller

    The only real things that have ‘real’ value are physical resources: water, crops, mines, forest, land, facilities to process them, etc…

  • Teller

    The only real things that have ‘real’ value are physical resources: water, crops, mines, forest, land, facilities to process them, etc…

  • http://twitter.com/pigle Valentine Sedlovsky

    now with all wireless graphite prevails.

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