Oxford English Dictionary Adds OMG And LOL In 2011 Edition

42781174_7aae7bb0dc_zMark Brown at Wired reports:

The Oxford English Dictionary has announced the latest batch of words and phrases deemed worthy of etymological conservation. From the encyclopedia’s just-released 2011 edition, you’ll see cream crackered, wag and tinfoil hat, as well as internet-era initialisms like LOL and OMG.

They help to say more in media where there is a limit to a number of characters one may use in a single message,” says principal editor Graeme Diamond on the dictionary’s website. With the rise of concise text messages and 140-character tweets, sometimes less is more. But there’s more to OMG and LOL than just textbox frugality, though, explains Diamond.

“The intention is usually to signal an informal, gossipy mode of expression, and perhaps parody the level of unreflective enthusiasm or overstatement that can sometimes appear in online discourse, while at the same time marking oneself as an ‘insider’ au fait with the forms of expression associated with the latest technology.”

[Continues at Wired]

20 Comments on "Oxford English Dictionary Adds OMG And LOL In 2011 Edition"

  1. Doubleplusgood!

    “It’s a beautiful thing, the destruction of words.” –Syme, 1984.

  2. Doubleplusgood!

    “It’s a beautiful thing, the destruction of words.” –Syme, 1984.

  3. What words did they eliminate?

  4. justagirl | Mar 29, 2011 at 12:26 am |

    doubleplusungood. fucker.

  5. Bud Bundy | Mar 29, 2011 at 2:53 am |

    How long until people are saying these “words” out loud, without a trace of irony?

  6. Bud Bundy | Mar 28, 2011 at 10:53 pm |

    How long until people are saying these “words” out loud, without a trace of irony?

    • dirtyjohnny | Mar 29, 2011 at 7:54 am |

      as if irony helped anything these days. the irony just shows the world you know better, but baah in chorus.

  7. Anonymous | Mar 29, 2011 at 3:15 am |

    LOLOLOLOL !!

  8. dirtyjohnny | Mar 29, 2011 at 11:52 am |

    These things are just verbal ticks of some sort. They are rarely used to express what they actually mean. Nobody is actually laughing out loud. They remind me of “filler” words such as “like” and “um”.
    Every generation seems compelled to harbor disdain for their little siblings. I find these expressions obnoxious and intellect-corroding, but probably no more so than their Gen-X counterparts.
    Perhaps they disturb us more deeply due to their digital origins? I’m more than a shade Luddite myself, but I find it artificial to single out this sort of expression. The central trap of techno-rhetoric is treating new platforms as actually all that new. You have to really buy into the marketing to praise or deplore social networking as something more than “party-line meets yearbook meets open mic night.” This stuff may give the GDP a nudge or two, but it’s historical myopia to privilege it’s importance above xerox machines and walkie-talkies. After all, couldn’t we be discussing the groundbreaking ramifications of ass-xeroxing in the office place just as easily as sexting or the etiquette of status updates?
    xmfao -xeroxing my fucking ass off! lick the ’tain’t, kiddies!

  9. dirtyjohnny | Mar 29, 2011 at 7:52 am |

    These things are just verbal ticks of some sort. They are rarely used to express what they actually mean. Nobody is actually laughing out loud. They remind me of “filler” words such as “like” and “um”.
    Every generation seems compelled to harbor disdain for their little siblings. I find these expressions obnoxious and intellect-corroding, but probably no more so than their Gen-X counterparts.
    Perhaps they disturb us more deeply due to their digital origins? I’m more than a shade Luddite myself, but I find it artificial to single out this sort of expression. The central trap of techno-rhetoric is treating new platforms as actually all that new. You have to really buy into the marketing to praise or deplore social networking as something more than “party-line meets yearbook meets open mic night.” This stuff may give the GDP a nudge or two, but it’s historical myopia to privilege it’s importance above xerox machines and walkie-talkies. After all, couldn’t we be discussing the groundbreaking ramifications of ass-xeroxing in the office place just as easily as sexting or the etiquette of status updates?
    xmfao -xeroxing my fucking ass off! lick the ’tain’t, kiddies!

  10. dirtyjohnny | Mar 29, 2011 at 11:54 am |

    as if irony helped anything these days. the irony just shows the world you know better, but baah in chorus.

  11. It’s more that the words they added reflect our everyday communication becoming less fluent.

  12. j87soccer | Apr 26, 2011 at 8:01 pm |

    they took out gullible

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