Transcendental Meditation Fashionable Again

David Lynch has been publicly evangelizing the benefits of Transcendental Meditation for many years, but he needed some A-list Hollywood amperage to land him on the front page of the current Sunday Styles section of the New York Times, where he is shown in a photo with Russell Brand. The accompanying story begins with an account of Brand’s colorful past before detailing his involvement with TM:

…It is jarring then, to say the least, to hear Mr. Brand, 35, speaking passionately and sincerely about the emotional solace he has found in Transcendental Meditation, or TM. Yet there he was in December, onstage at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (as his new wife, the pop singer Katy Perry, waited backstage), describing how TM has helped him repair his psychic wounds.

“Transcendental Meditation has been incredibly valuable to me both in my recovery as a drug addict and in my personal life, my marriage, my professional life,” Mr. Brand said of the technique that prescribes two 15- to 20-minute sessions a day of silently repeating a one-to-three syllable mantra, so that practitioners can access a state of what is known as transcendental consciousness. “I literally had an idea drop into my brain the other day while I was meditating which I think is worth millions of dollars.”

Mr. Brand was the M.C. at a benefit for the David Lynch Foundation, an organization that offers TM at no cost to troubled students, veterans, homeless people, prisoners and others. Like many other guests in the room, Mr. Brand has been personally counseled by Mr. Lynch, the enigmatic film director, who has been a devout practitioner of TM, founded in 1958 by the spiritual leader Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, since its first wave of popularity in the late ’60s. That is when Mia Farrow, after her divorce from Frank Sinatra, joined the Beatles in the Maharishi’s ashram in Rishikesh, India; when George Lucas started meditating and was rumored to have based the Yoda character in “Star Wars” on the Maharishi (the resemblance is eerie); and when the talk show host Merv Griffin, after being introduced to the technique by his tennis buddy, the actor Clint Eastwood, invited the Maharishi to be on his show in 1975.

Since then, the celebrity endorsement, and therefore the enrollment numbers, had quieted down. That is, until the last three years when, according to the national Transcendental Meditation program, enrollment tripled…

[continues in the New York Times]

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  • Sheeple

    Because you should PAY someone to learn to meditate and believe to “celebrity” freaks… Yeaaaaaah Ok ;o)

  • Sheeple

    Because you should PAY someone to learn to meditate and believe to “celebrity” freaks… Yeaaaaaah Ok ;o)

  • Blah

    Based on what I just read and saw, I wouldn’t agree with the title of this article that TM is “fashionable” again. Apparently, some of you are skeptical when those that have money are endorsing anything, and that is understandable, but I personally know the benefits of meditation, in general, and I agree that it has helped me grow personally. I don’t necessarily believe one can sell personal growth, although there are people who do have money, who wish to try to buy this sort of thing. If that is their decision, then fine. Also, it specifically says “no cost to troubled students, veterans, homeless people, prisoners and others.” And if anyone else was paying attention to the video before slamming it, the press conference they are at is for the David Lynch Foundation, yes, but also, more specifically “Operation: Warrior Wellness.” I don’t know if anything could help the soldiers coming home, but if there IS anything that could help, this would be it. Props to them for trying.

  • Blah

    Based on what I just read and saw, I wouldn’t agree with the title of this article that TM is “fashionable” again. Apparently, some of you are skeptical when those that have money are endorsing anything, and that is understandable, but I personally know the benefits of meditation, in general, and I agree that it has helped me grow personally. I don’t necessarily believe one can sell personal growth, although there are people who do have money, who wish to try to buy this sort of thing. If that is their decision, then fine. Also, it specifically says “no cost to troubled students, veterans, homeless people, prisoners and others.” And if anyone else was paying attention to the video before slamming it, the press conference they are at is for the David Lynch Foundation, yes, but also, more specifically “Operation: Warrior Wellness.” I don’t know if anything could help the soldiers coming home, but if there IS anything that could help, this would be it. Props to them for trying.

  • dumbsaint

    The TM cult has ruined one of my favorite artists. It’s all Lynch can talk about these days. That guy brought me into a deeper world and I love him for it; but stfu about TM already.

  • Anonymous

    The TM cult has ruined one of my favorite artists. It’s all Lynch can talk about these days. That guy brought me into a deeper world and I love him for it; but stfu about TM already.

  • John Gillanders

    I’ve been doing transcendental meditation for years. I still do it regularly, but have never reaped the insane benefits advertised by Lynch or other devotees. So what I ‘m saying is, it has a more profound effect on some than it has on others, but I still enjoy it and practice it – so obviously I’m getting something out of it, or I would have stopped.

    Definitely worth your time, but be ready for it not to be as amazing and transformative as it is for some people. Then again, maybe you’re one of those people, so I guess, yeah, fucking do it up.

    • TMdevotee

      No, no, no…You just didn’t pay for the “deluxe package” that’s why you aren’t getting the deluxe benefits. For $50,000 they give you an extra syllable to hum and thats the difference.

  • John Gillanders

    I’ve been doing transcendental meditation for years. I still do it regularly, but have never reaped the insane benefits advertised by Lynch or other devotees. So what I ‘m saying is, it has a more profound effect on some than it has on others, but I still enjoy it and practice it – so obviously I’m getting something out of it, or I would have stopped.

    Definitely worth your time, but be ready for it not to be as amazing and transformative as it is for some people. Then again, maybe you’re one of those people, so I guess, yeah, fucking do it up.

  • GoodDoktorBad

    Oh good, I was waiting for it to become fashionable again. Now I can get on with life without fear of ridicule.

  • Anonymous

    Oh good, I was waiting for it to become fashionable again. Now I can get on with life without fear of ridicule.

  • 5by5

    TM (Trademark) Meditation may do people some good, but it is just one, really well-marketed form of meditation.

    From a scientific perspective, meditative techniques have been proven to yield significant mental health benefits, and especially when it comes to helping soldiers trying to deal with PTSD, I’m in favor of it.

    But then, I’m also in favor of decriminalizing the therapeutical use of Ecstasy (MDMA) too, because before it was irrationally made a Schedule I drug in the wackjob 1980’s, it was being used VERY successfully to help Vietnam Vets combat this same problem.

  • 5by5

    TM (Trademark) Meditation may do people some good, but it is just one, really well-marketed form of meditation.

    From a scientific perspective, meditative techniques have been proven to yield significant mental health benefits, and especially when it comes to helping soldiers trying to deal with PTSD, I’m in favor of it.

    But then, I’m also in favor of decriminalizing the therapeutical use of Ecstasy (MDMA) too, because before it was irrationally made a Schedule I drug in the wackjob 1980’s, it was being used VERY successfully to help Vietnam Vets combat this same problem.

  • TMdevotee

    No, no, no…You just didn’t pay for the “deluxe package” that’s why you aren’t getting the deluxe benefits. For $50,000 they give you an extra syllable to hum and thats the difference.

  • Andy

    TM is one of those things you have to experience for your self.. not some one else’s opinion of it… or you.

  • Andy

    TM is one of those things you have to experience for your self.. not some one else’s opinion of it… or you.

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