German Inventor Saves Fuel By Flying A Kite

SkySail kite being demonstrated at promotional event. Photo: Ursula Horn (CC)

SkySail kite being demonstrated at promotional event. Photo: Ursula Horn (CC)

SkySails has invented a method that could cut down on ‘fuel consumption, costs and carbon footprints’ for commercial ships by developing giant kites. The Raw Story reports:

The blue-hulled vessel would slip by unnoticed on most seas if not for the white kite, high above her prow, towing her to what its creators hope will be a bright, wind-efficient future.

The enormous kite, which looks like a paraglider, works in tandem with the ship’s engines, cutting back on fuel consumption, costs, and carbon footprint.

“Using kites you can harness more energy than with any other type of wind-powered equipment,” said German inventor Stephan Wrage, whose company SkySails is looking for lift-off on the back of worldwide efforts to boost renewable energy.

The 160-square-metre (524-square-foot) kite, tethered to a yellow rope, can sail 500 metres into the skies where winds are both stronger and more stable, according to the 38-year-old Wrage.

The secret to the kite’s efficiency lies in its speed and computer-controlled flight pattern.

[Continues at The Raw Story]

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  • Anon

    This was news a couple years ago… glad to see that this has really taken off!
    ~Sometimes people can’t understand my sarcasm.. poor demented fools.

  • Anon

    This was news a couple years ago… glad to see that this has really taken off!
    ~Sometimes people can’t understand my sarcasm.. poor demented fools.

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More in alternative fuel, Alternative Resources, Carbon Footprint, Eco-Friendly, Environmentalism, Fuel Consumption, Invention, Kite, Machinery, Marine Technology, Shipbuilding, ships
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