St. Kitts & Nevis: Citizenship For Sale

St. Kitts & Nevis

St. Kitts & Nevis

The recent discussions of birth certificates and citizenship have rekindled my interest in living and working abroad, and, consequently, my frustration at just very how hard this is for the average person to accomplish. Each government jealousy guards its citizenship and work permits, even from friendly countries with whom it shares close cultural and economic ties. “I want to immerse myself in Europe’s culture and history,” I reflected, “not pop its cherry. Is there any country in the world which is even a little, you know…easy?” That’s how I learned about St. Kitts and Nevis.

If my coveted United Kingdom is an ice princess that does not deign to look down upon me from her ivory tower, St. Kitts and Nevis is her busty niece who is a sucker for men with flashy cars. St. Kitts and Nevis is a tiny English-speaking island state in the Caribbean; an independent Commonwealth realm whose Governor-General answers to Queen Elizabeth II. If you Google citizenship for that country, you do not immediately come across an government site, as you might expect, but a host of shady businesses operating under domain names like “offshoreinfo.com” and “offshore-services.biz.” The latter purports to teach you “how to legally escape taxes of your home country, and how to get a new life and citizenship in St. Kitts and Nevis.”

St. Kitts and Nevis boasts the world’s oldest “citizenship-by-investment” program. With a clean background/HIV check, the purchase of some real estate on one of the country’s two tropical islands, and an investment of $250,000, these companies will put you on the fast track to citizenship. Many countries now have some type of citizenship-by-investment program—the UK sells her wares for £1,000,000 or more—but she has a right to expect nice things from her suitors, doesn’t she? As an offshore tax shelter, St. Kitts and Nevis’s citizenship program is more about what your country can do for you. Escapeartist.com writes:

As a citizen of St. Kitts & Nevis, you can live and work in the islands anytime, although there is no obligation to so. You also enjoy special rights and privileges in the United Kingdom. You are not liable to taxation in St. Kitts & Nevis as there is no income tax, capital gains tax, wealth tax or inheritance tax!

The whole procedure—from submitting the application up to the issue of the citizenship certificate and passport—takes about three months. You don’t need to travel to St. Kitts & Nevis for this purpose, but we highly recommend that you do so you may personally choose the property you would like to invest in.

Your St. Kitts and Nevis citizenship is not only a shrewd financial investment, but it affords you the opportunity to travel without the hassle of acknowledging your true nationality:

A passport from a peaceful, neutral and non-controversial country…carries many benefits. It lets you travel more freely and discreetly; protect yourself and your affairs from privacy invaders…And if you’re ever in the hands of someone with a grudge against your home nation, being able to present yourself as a citizen of another country may even save your life.

In an unsettled world, acquiring real estate outside your home country, along with an alternative citizenship and passport, is a wise investment in your personal security, freedom and privacy.

Think of how easily you will sleep knowing that the door is always open for you to abandon your home country in its time of need.

St. Kitts and Nevis probably has some sort of culture and history. Offshoreinfo.com gives brief mention to a “well-educated, English speaking and friendly” workforce that offers “good opportunities for investors and manufacturers,” but little else said of the people who actually inhabit the tiny islands. After all, what does a love of a country for its people and culture have to do with earning citizenship?

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  • http://voxmagi-necessarywords.blogspot.com/ VoxMagi

    I can’t remember all the business numbers that call me from time to time…but this article made me take notice because at least one regular caller I deal with is a business that may be located in the US…but whose phone ID throws the St Kitts and Nevis tag every time they call. I’ll be watching more closely until I see exactly who it is thats offshored their HQ while actually operating here. Very curious.

  • http://voxmagi-necessarywords.blogspot.com/ VoxMagi

    I can’t remember all the business numbers that call me from time to time…but this article made me take notice because at least one regular caller I deal with is a business that may be located in the US…but whose phone ID throws the St Kitts and Nevis tag every time they call. I’ll be watching more closely until I see exactly who it is thats offshored their HQ while actually operating here. Very curious.

  • cottonmouth

    they are also a homphobic country as with the custom of most Caribbean islands.

  • cottonmouth

    they are also a homphobic country as with the custom of most Caribbean islands.

  • http://www.nickmeador.org/ ndmeador

    I live on St. Kitts right now, where my partner attends vet school. I describe the federation as a microcosm for the entire world. It’s a very troubled place. As far as I know, all the above is true. It’s no secret on the island. Most people know about the citizenship-by-property-ownership program. I’m not sure what matters more though–being a citizen, or having obscene amounts of money. It’s one of those places where 2% of the people control 95% of the land, goods, etc. And after shutting down the sugar cane industry 5 years ago, they are now totally dependent on cruise lines (and other tourism) and foreign students (they also have a nursing and medical school on island). In essence, they must prostitute themselves to survive. Yet even though it’s a country of only 50,000 people, they still have trouble keeping the public informed in a way that would allow them to run the country in any sort of efficient way. Someone anonymously started a news site to help change that: http://eyeonstkitts.wordpress.com/

  • http://www.nickmeador.org/ ndmeador

    I live on St. Kitts right now, where my partner attends vet school. I describe the federation as a microcosm for the entire world. It’s a very troubled place. As far as I know, all the above is true. It’s no secret on the island. Most people know about the citizenship-by-property-ownership program. I’m not sure what matters more though–being a citizen, or having obscene amounts of money. It’s one of those places where 2% of the people control 95% of the land, goods, etc. And after shutting down the sugar cane industry 5 years ago, they are now totally dependent on cruise lines (and other tourism) and foreign students (they also have a nursing and medical school on island). In essence, they must prostitute themselves to survive. Yet even though it’s a country of only 50,000 people, they still have trouble keeping the public informed in a way that would allow them to run the country in any sort of efficient way. Someone anonymously started a news site to help change that: http://eyeonstkitts.wordpress.com/