Texas Blocked From Debuting Controversial New Lethal-Injection Cocktail

ap_texas_execution_cleve_foster_nt_110405_mnThe state of Texas will have to wait until another day to try out a newly formulated death-inducing mixture which critics say could cause agonizing suffering. Cleve Foster, a Desert Storm veteran convicted of the murder of a woman he’d met in a bar, was scheduled to be executed tonight; this afternoon the Supreme Court blocked his execution for reasons including “questions related to his guilt.” The Atlantic Wire elaborates:

Foster has maintained his innocence for years, writing that he is “on death row waiting to die for a crime another man has confessed to.” He’s referring to Sheldon Ward, who was convicted alongside Foster in 2004 and has since died in prison of a brain tumor.

The drugs the state would have used to execute Foster–a cocktail of pentobarbital, pancuronium bromide, and potassium chloride–have never been used in a Texas execution before.

If the cocktail doesn’t work properly, says Stafford Smith, director of the human-rights organization Reprieve, then during his execution, Foster will experience “excruciating pain that has been likened to having one’s veins set on fire.”

18 Comments on "Texas Blocked From Debuting Controversial New Lethal-Injection Cocktail"

  1. At least Ohio and Washington have started using only a large dose of sodium Pentothal or pentobarbital. It works. You don’t need the other two drugs.

  2. At least Ohio and Washington have started using only a large dose of sodium Pentothal or pentobarbital. It works. You don’t need the other two drugs.

  3. Not a fan of death penalty myself…too merciful…but what disappoints me is the grounds for this. Would it be too much to ask that they intervene for the people where actual doubt and legal malfeasance are involved? This guy gets saved at the last moment because the drug cocktail may be questionable…not because theres actual doubt about his guilt. Thats just pathetic. Screw him…bail out the people who may have been railroaded with nearly no solid evidence beyond hearsay and coerced/recanted testimony.

  4. Not a fan of death penalty myself…too merciful…but what disappoints me is the grounds for this. Would it be too much to ask that they intervene for the people where actual doubt and legal malfeasance are involved? This guy gets saved at the last moment because the drug cocktail may be questionable…not because theres actual doubt about his guilt. Thats just pathetic. Screw him…bail out the people who may have been railroaded with nearly no solid evidence beyond hearsay and coerced/recanted testimony.

  5. Not a fan of death penalty myself…too merciful…but what disappoints me is the grounds for this. Would it be too much to ask that they intervene for the people where actual doubt and legal malfeasance are involved? This guy gets saved at the last moment because the drug cocktail may be questionable…not because theres actual doubt about his guilt. Thats just pathetic. Screw him…bail out the people who may have been railroaded with nearly no solid evidence beyond hearsay and coerced/recanted testimony.

  6. Strummingbabe | Apr 6, 2011 at 6:40 am |

    the guy didnt do it fuck off let him go fuck drug nazis kshoot thei r own assholes up with their cancer drugs

  7. Strummingbabe | Apr 6, 2011 at 2:40 am |

    the guy didnt do it fuck off let him go fuck drug nazis kshoot thei r own assholes up with their cancer drugs

  8. The convict was spared because of doubt about his guilt, not because the drug cocktail may be questionable.

  9. Ironaddict06 | Apr 6, 2011 at 3:42 pm |

    No true. Yes, that was true a few months ago. He was suppose to be dead a couple of months ago, but was speared at the last minute. They did take a look at his case, and concluded he was guilty. You can go to the Houston Chronicle and read the story.

  10. Ironaddict06 | Apr 6, 2011 at 3:45 pm |

    I agree. Ok instead of the cocktail, Texas will use a rope that is made in the USA and an Oak tree grown in the USA.

  11. Anonymous | Apr 7, 2011 at 2:14 am |

    Animal euthanasia is better regulated in Texas than executions. The drugs they planed to use are prohibited for use on animals, even in Texas.

    There are very few practices more barbarian than death penalty.

  12. Anonymous | Apr 7, 2011 at 2:14 am |

    Animal euthanasia is better regulated in Texas than executions. The drugs they planed to use are prohibited for use on animals, even in Texas.

    There are very few practices more barbarian than death penalty.

  13. SikterEfendi | Apr 6, 2011 at 10:14 pm |

    Animal euthanasia is better regulated in Texas than executions. The drugs they planed to use are prohibited for use on animals, even in Texas.

    There are very few practices more barbarian than death penalty.

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