Bin Laden Operation Featured In Two Video Games

Osama Video GameThis didn’t take long … Stephen Johnson reports on G4’s The Feed:

This Saturday, Kuma games released their Osama Bin Laden chapter in Kuma War. There’s also a Counter-Strike map so players can relive the glorious victory of the U.S. over the terrorist leader again and again in their homes.To be fair, the Counter-Strike map is simply a recreation of Osama’s hideout, not a full fledged, “let’s kill Osama” game, but it’s still interesting, both in terms of how quickly the game and map appeared, and in terms of what they say about how we feel about war.

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35 Comments on "Bin Laden Operation Featured In Two Video Games"

  1. Anonymous | May 9, 2011 at 10:47 pm |

    Overheard at my local LAN center, circa 1998: “Dude, we should totally go to the real Jalalabad. We would PWN there.”

  2. Overheard at my local LAN center, circa 2008: “Dude, we should totally go to the real Jalalabad. We would PWN there.”

  3. E.B. Wolf | May 9, 2011 at 11:11 pm |

    What the hell? You don’t even get to shoot women in this simulation? What a ripoff!

  4. E.B. Wolf | May 9, 2011 at 7:11 pm |

    What the hell? You don’t even get to shoot women in this simulation? What a ripoff!

  5. Butter Knife | May 9, 2011 at 11:22 pm |

    “it’s still interesting, both in terms of how quickly the game and map
    appeared, and in terms of what they say about how we feel about war”

    Is it really? I feel like this is a retread of discussions most people deemed pointless about 10 years ago… there isn’t any clear statistical evidence that video game violence begets real-world violence, and once adjusted for variables like age, gender, wealth, etc. most studies actually show a somewhat negative correlation.

    Video games are an expressive outlet much like any other media, it just seems to be taking some social observers a long time to realize it. I would be much more surprised if, despite the proliferation of references to and renditions of the event in other media outlets (Saturday Night Live had several just in this last show), none were made in video games. Actually, the fact that relatively few have so far been made *is* a surprise.

  6. Butter Knife | May 9, 2011 at 7:22 pm |

    “it’s still interesting, both in terms of how quickly the game and map
    appeared, and in terms of what they say about how we feel about war”

    Is it really? I feel like this is a retread of discussions most people deemed pointless about 10 years ago… there isn’t any clear statistical evidence that video game violence begets real-world violence, and once adjusted for variables like age, gender, wealth, etc. most studies actually show a somewhat negative correlation.

    Video games are an expressive outlet much like any other media, it just seems to be taking some social observers a long time to realize it. I would be much more surprised if, despite the proliferation of references to and renditions of the event in other media outlets (Saturday Night Live had several just in this last show), none were made in video games. Actually, the fact that relatively few have so far been made *is* a surprise.

    • No. It is not because we had this video game that this happened (if this is, indeed, what happened)…It is because this “happened” that we have this game. It glorifies the whole thing, and that is disturbing. It’s like celebrating his death in the streets.

      Also, It’s propaganda.

      • Hadrian999 | May 9, 2011 at 8:30 pm |

        violence and aggression has always been celebrated by humans, our heroes aren’t philosophers or farmers, they are warriors, governments have almost always grown up around a warrior class, it is our nature, we love conflict and battle our leisure activities have long been about simulated war and conquest, this is nothing new. everything is propaganda

        • Markov Cheney | May 10, 2011 at 8:28 am |

          Nothing new does not equal nothing to change

          • Hadrian999 | May 10, 2011 at 11:11 am |

            what do you propose, censorship of entertainment only allowing neutered official forms of fun.

            people need outlets and need to be instructed in the proper time and place for their aggression and how to use it honorably, total suppression of aggressive instincts will not work
            .

    • I’ve never liked that argument about video games causing violence either. But I think politicians and such aren’t the best to argue about what effects games have on people, they reduce it to “This is violent, therefore censor it to stop violence” – which is bullshit. However, there is a lot of proof that it normalizes and reinforces violence as it already exists in the world, and that is a point that should be discussed and analyzed, not for censorship but for understanding how video games can sometimes be a propaganda for certain social norms. (violence against women, glorification of war, so on). Also @Hadrian999:disqus – I am not sure that it can be reduced to “humans celebrate violence, it is our nature, so it just is” – I think the fact that warrior classes tend to rule and be powerful has a lot more to do with societies learning to celebrate violence than “human nature” as such.

  7. Anonymous | May 9, 2011 at 11:32 pm |

    There was one enemy in the entire map and he still managed to die

  8. Anonymous | May 9, 2011 at 11:32 pm |

    There was one enemy in the entire map and he still managed to die

  9. dumbsaint | May 9, 2011 at 7:32 pm |

    There was one enemy in the entire map and he still managed to die

  10. No. It is not because we had this video game that this happened (if this is, indeed, what happened)…It is because this “happened” that we have this game. It glorifies the whole thing, and that is disturbing. It’s like celebrating his death in the streets.

    Also, It’s propaganda.

  11. Hadrian999 | May 10, 2011 at 12:30 am |

    violence and aggression has always been celebrated by humans, our heroes aren’t philosophers or farmers, they are warriors, governments have almost always grown up around a warrior class, it is our nature, we love conflict and battle our leisure activities have long been about simulated war and conquest, this is nothing new. everything is propaganda

  12. Hadrian999 | May 10, 2011 at 12:30 am |

    violence and aggression has always been celebrated by humans, our heroes aren’t philosophers or farmers, they are warriors, governments have almost always grown up around a warrior class, it is our nature, we love conflict and battle our leisure activities have long been about simulated war and conquest, this is nothing new. everything is propaganda

  13. Pakistani Intelligence is turning over the three female impersonators who shacked with OBL to American intelligence for questioning. But the interviews should be handled by Larry King,Rush Limbaugh, Alex Jones,and Michael Savage. Otherwise the details about their love life will be censored.

  14. Pakistani Intelligence is turning over the three female impersonators who shacked with OBL to American intelligence for questioning. But the interviews should be handled by Larry King,Rush Limbaugh, Alex Jones,and Michael Savage. Otherwise the details about their love life will be censored.

  15. I’ve never liked that argument about video games causing violence either. But I think politicians and such aren’t the best to argue about what effects games have on people, they reduce it to “This is violent, therefore censor it to stop violence” – which is bullshit. However, there is a lot of proof that it normalizes and reinforces violence as it already exists in the world, and that is a point that should be discussed and analyzed, not for censorship but for understanding how video games can sometimes be a propaganda for certain social norms. (violence against women, glorification of war, so on). Also @Hadrian999:disqus – I am not sure that it can be reduced to “humans celebrate violence, it is our nature, so it just is” – I think the fact that warrior classes tend to rule and be powerful has a lot more to do with societies learning to celebrate violence than “human nature” as such.

  16. Anonymous | May 10, 2011 at 2:02 am |

    If violence is like a disease, video games like these are a symptom of it, not a cause.

  17. GoodDoktorBad | May 9, 2011 at 10:02 pm |

    If violence is like a disease, video games like these are a symptom of it, not a cause.

    • Hadrian999 | May 9, 2011 at 10:21 pm |

      violence isn’t a disease, it is a necessary part of life. the disease is our gleeful destruction of ethics and integrity that has lead us to a place where unfocused never ending violence is the answer to all questions.

      “Justice without force is powerless; force without justice is tyrannical.”

      Blaise Pascal

  18. Hadrian999 | May 10, 2011 at 2:21 am |

    violence isn’t a disease, it is a necessary part of life. the disease is our gleeful destruction of ethics and integrity that has lead us to a place where unfocused never ending violence is the answer to all questions.

    “Justice without force is powerless; force without justice is tyrannical.”

    Blaise Pascal

  19. It looks like, in their version, Osama is armed.

  20. It looks like, in their version, Osama is armed.

  21. Anonymous | May 10, 2011 at 8:56 am |

    My favorite part is “Objective 2: Recover Osama bin Laden’s body.”

    This HAS to be made by the government.

  22. CeleryGeneral | May 10, 2011 at 4:56 am |

    My favorite part is “Objective 2: Recover Osama bin Laden’s body.”

    This HAS to be made by the government.

  23. Markov Cheney | May 10, 2011 at 12:28 pm |

    Nothing new does not equal nothing to change

  24. Hadrian999 | May 10, 2011 at 3:11 pm |

    what do you propose, censorship of entertainment only allowing neutered official forms of fun.

    people need outlets and need to be instructed in the proper time and place for their aggression and how to use it honorably, total suppression of aggressive instincts will not work
    .

  25. Objective 4: Dump it in the ocean, with great haste.

  26. Objective 4: Dump it in the ocean, with great haste.

  27. I was about to say the same comment.

Comments are closed.