Kartoonz Fer Krist’s Sake . . .

Found these bizarre clips on Youtube . . . from an old RTÉ series called “Give Up Yer Aul Sins

Pretty amazing in its own way.  The narrative content shows a pretty deep familiarity with the characters and plots central to the Christian drama, even if its skimpiness with the gorey brutality of The Passion seems a little naive.  I guess I have to keep in mind that this thing was produced by foreigners, so I shouldn’t expect them to demonstrate the sublte mastery of an American artiste like Mel Gibson.

Anyhow, the voice talent on this thing is superb–those actors sound like real kids.  One can only hope the polish of this thing inspires some for-real Americans to step up the plate with the likes of a “Terry Jones and the Westboro Babies” cartoon.

À la Dystopia Diaries

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11 Responses to Kartoonz Fer Krist’s Sake . . .

  1. Anonymous May 6, 2011 at 2:43 am #

    That’s because they are real kids, this was made from recordings of children reading bible stories.

  2. JoiquimCouteau May 5, 2011 at 10:43 pm #

    That’s because they are real kids, this was made from recordings of children reading bible stories.

    • feint_ruled May 6, 2011 at 8:14 am #

      LOL, exactly. My mother-in-law loves this program, she has a DVD of it that had a making of documentary too. Hearing kids interpret bible stories in their own naive way is cute and all but the strong impression I got from the doc was that the teacher had told the stories in this way herself (to appeal to the kids no doubt) and just recorded them parroting them to her back nearly verbatim. So less cute, more indocrination to my eyes!

    • Liam_McGonagle May 6, 2011 at 11:35 am #

      Well, I thought the irony in my comments would have been more apparent. Mel Gibson subtle? The man who made headlines by roaring drunk through the L.A. streets at 3:00am shouting about how the Zionists were out to get him?

      I really enjoyed these things because they convey an earnest sense of wonder in the Christ story, not a type of magisterial sense of Jesus as Eternal Avenger, as seems to be the modal expression of Christianity these days.

      These guys did a great job of it, too–you’d typically expect to leave the recounting of a crucifiction with a sense of loathing or stupid callous bloodlust than an appreciation of child-like awe. That’s all.

  3. Curtis May 6, 2011 at 3:20 am #

    I thought Mel Gibson was Australian, not American. Sorry not really an important detail but that was kinda bugging me.

  4. Curtis May 6, 2011 at 3:20 am #

    I thought Mel Gibson was Australian, not American. Sorry not really an important detail but that was kinda bugging me.

  5. Curtis May 5, 2011 at 11:20 pm #

    I thought Mel Gibson was Australian, not American. Sorry not really an important detail but that was kinda bugging me.

    • Liam_McGonagle May 6, 2011 at 11:41 am #

      I don’t know what the full scoop is. I think he was born in America, but the whole Gibson family packed up to Australia when he was like 8 or something, to help an older brother evade the U.S. draft for Vietnam.

      I don’t know what relative portion of his life he spent in America vs. Australia, or which passport(s) he holds or has held. But I think America has fully embraced him as one of their own out of appreciation for the persistent thread of violent jingoism in his work. Certainly seems ironic that a man who began life as an accessory to draft evasion was also responsible for “The Patriot”.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Patriot_(2000_film)

  6. feint_ruled May 6, 2011 at 12:14 pm #

    LOL, exactly. My mother-in-law loves this program, she has a DVD of it that had a making of documentary too. Hearing kids interpret bible stories in their own naive way is cute and all but the strong impression I got from the doc was that the teacher had told the stories in this way herself (to appeal to the kids no doubt) and just recorded them parroting them to her back nearly verbatim. So less cute, more indocrination to my eyes!

  7. Liam_McGonagle May 6, 2011 at 3:35 pm #

    Well, I thought the irony in my comments would have been more apparent. Mel Gibson subtle? The man who made headlines by roaring drunk through the L.A. streets at 3:00am shouting about how the Zionists were out to get him?

    I really enjoyed these things because they convey an earnest sense of wonder in the Christ story, not a type of magisterial sense of Jesus as Eternal Avenger, as seems to be the modal expression of Christianity these days.

    These guys did a great job of it, too–you’d typically expect to leave the recounting of a crucifiction with a sense of loathing or stupid callous bloodlust than an appreciation of child-like awe. That’s all.

  8. Liam_McGonagle May 6, 2011 at 3:41 pm #

    I don’t know what the full scoop is. I think he was born in America, but the whole Gibson family packed up to Australia when he was like 8 or something, to help an older brother evade the U.S. draft for Vietnam.

    I don’t know what relative portion of his life he spent in America vs. Australia, or which passport(s) he holds or has held. But I think America has fully embraced him as one of their own out of appreciation for the persistent thread of violent jingoism in his work. Certainly seems ironic that a man who began life as an accessory to draft evasion was also responsible for “The Patriot”.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Patriot_(2000_film)

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