NYC Bill Would Criminalize Buying Knockoff Goods

Counterfeit Rolex Watch, dsc4577 5f270The Wall Street Journal reports:

NEW YORK — A city lawmaker said Tuesday she’ll introduce a bill to criminalize the purchase of counterfeit designer goods including handbags and watches.

The bill proposed by City Councilwoman Margaret Chin would impose penalties of up to a year in jail or a $1,000 fine for buying knockoffs.

“I urge visitors that come to New York to come for the authenticity, not to buy these fake bags or electronics,” Chin said. “We have local designers that create unique items at affordable prices, and they’re available. So don’t just come here for the knockoffs.”

A 2004 report by then-city Comptroller William Thompson found that about 8 percent of the approximately $287 billion in counterfeit goods sold in the United States annually is sold in New York City, resulting in more than $1 billion in lost tax revenue.

It is already illegal to sell fake designer goods, but Susan Scafidic, head of the Fashion Law Institute at Fordham University, said that if Chin’s bill passes New York would be the first U.S. city to criminalize their purchase…

For more information, see original article.

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  • http://hormeticminds.blogspot.com/ Chaorder Gradient

    But what will become of China Town!

  • http://hormeticminds.blogspot.com/ Chaorder Gradient

    But what will become of China Town!

  • Hadrian999

    new york is out to hurt small businessmen, such a shame

  • Hadrian999

    new york is out to hurt small businessmen, such a shame

  • JoiquimCouteau

    What she needs is a kick in the Chin

  • Anonymous

    What she needs is a kick in the Chin

  • SF2K01

    What a joke: “We have local designers that create unique items at affordable prices, and they’re available. So don’t just come here for the knockoffs.” – I’m not certain how items that look like fancy items but I know aren’t don’t count as “unique items at affordable prices.” What happened to a free market? As long as you know it’s a knock off, you should be allowed to buy it, and there are plenty of knock offs I can buy online (video, clothes, etc).

    IMO If this bill passes, someone should definitely contest the legality.

  • Anonymous

    What a joke: “We have local designers that create unique items at affordable prices, and they’re available. So don’t just come here for the knockoffs.” – I’m not certain how items that look like fancy items but I know aren’t don’t count as “unique items at affordable prices.” What happened to a free market? As long as you know it’s a knock off, you should be allowed to buy it, and there are plenty of knock offs I can buy online (video, clothes, etc).

    IMO If this bill passes, someone should definitely contest the legality.

  • The Buck Mason

    Awesome, then they can have sidewalk checkpoints to examine all items of clothing and accesories to fight the war on knockoffs…strips searches to fight the plague of counterfit bras and panties! Welcome to 1984!

  • The Buck Mason

    Awesome, then they can have sidewalk checkpoints to examine all items of clothing and accesories to fight the war on knockoffs…strips searches to fight the plague of counterfit bras and panties! Welcome to 1984!

  • emperorreagan

    In what world are $1,000+ watches and $500+ handbags affordable?

    Oh yeah.

    In a world where you’re a piece of shit politician getting paid by big NYC corporations to do their bidding.

  • emperorreagan

    In what world are $1,000+ watches and $500+ handbags affordable?

    Oh yeah.

    In a world where you’re a piece of shit politician getting paid by big NYC corporations to do their bidding.

  • Liam_McGonagle

    Curious that it’s the purchase–not the sale of the goods that seems to be the enforcement target.

    Doesn’t it just strike you as the least efficient way possible to approach the issue? As if the vast quantities of counterfeit inventories were easier to track by the tens of thousands of purchasers rather than the handful of vendors? And wouldn’t one normally think it’d be the vendor, not the purchaser, who’d have a more reasonable knowledge base from which to evaluate the goods’ authenticity?

    This Chin person seems like a simpleton.

  • Liam_McGonagle

    Curious that it’s the purchase–not the sale of the goods that seems to be the enforcement target.

    Doesn’t it just strike you as the least efficient way possible to approach the issue? As if the vast quantities of counterfeit inventories were easier to track by the tens of thousands of purchasers rather than the handful of vendors? And wouldn’t one normally think it’d be the vendor, not the purchaser, who’d have a more reasonable knowledge base from which to evaluate the goods’ authenticity?

    This Chin person seems like a simpleton.

  • Liam_McGonagle

    Curious that it’s the purchase–not the sale of the goods that seems to be the enforcement target.

    Doesn’t it just strike you as the least efficient way possible to approach the issue? As if the vast quantities of counterfeit inventories were easier to track by the tens of thousands of purchasers rather than the handful of vendors? And wouldn’t one normally think it’d be the vendor, not the purchaser, who’d have a more reasonable knowledge base from which to evaluate the goods’ authenticity?

    This Chin person seems like a simpleton.

  • Simiantongue

    Does this mean that I should avoid anyone that looks like Chris Hanson from dateline NBC when I buy a watch in NYC?

    Me: “How much is that Swatch?”

    Response “Hi there, Chris Hansen Dateline NBC. Why don’t you have a seat?”

  • Simiantongue

    Does this mean that I should avoid anyone that looks like Chris Hanson from dateline NBC when I buy a watch in NYC?

    Me: “How much is that Swatch?”

    Response “Hi there, Chris Hansen Dateline NBC. Why don’t you have a seat?”

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