Bernie Sanders Reveals The Top Corporate Tax Avoiders

Why is Congress giving tax cuts and refunds to America’s wealthiest corporations, whilst welfare families, low-income and middle class communities, teachers, children and the elderly are being asked to sacrifice basic rights and access to resources like education and medicaid?

Did you get your tax refund? These companies certainly did. On the Senate floor, Bernie Sanders tears into the ten worst corporate tax avoiders, including Bank of America, Exxon Mobil, Citibank, and Goldman Sachs. The numbers are simply staggering.

24 Comments on "Bernie Sanders Reveals The Top Corporate Tax Avoiders"

  1. Anonymous | Jun 7, 2011 at 4:31 pm |

    He’s like the only Senator who speaks to these problems. I’ve heard a few say things on tv here and there but Mr. Sanders’ consistency on the matter is unmatched.

  2. He’s like the only Senator who speaks to these problems. I’ve heard a few say things on tv here and there but Mr. Sanders’ consistency on the matter is unmatched.

  3. Anonymous | Jun 7, 2011 at 7:12 pm |

    Bernie Sanders for president in 2012!!!

  4. urza9814 | Jun 7, 2011 at 3:12 pm |

    Bernie Sanders for president in 2012!!!

    • E.B. Wolf | Jun 7, 2011 at 8:12 pm |

      No way that would be allowed to happen.

      • Liam_McGonagle | Jun 8, 2011 at 11:23 am |

        Unfortunately you’re spot on there–Sanders himself has explicitly stated his preference for retirement rather than presidential ambitions.

        While working up a think piece recently about the legacies of selected Founding Fathers, I considered the differences in the various roles of president/party chief/cabinet member.  Jefferson was kind of an anomoly in that he filled all three positions.  Washington was never really a party chief or cabinet member.  Adams was never really a party chief.  And the guy who comes closest, in my mind, to being Jefferson’s ideological counter-part, Alexander Hamilton, was never president, being a filthy foreign-born type.

        Undeniably the president has a key role to fill, but it’s much less important than most people think.  It’s a role that’s probably suited for a more muscular, less intelligent person who can count on a brilliant cabinet and legislative caucus to do most of the blocking and tackling.

      • thomas vesely | Jun 8, 2011 at 11:27 am |

        and therein lies the problem.
        i have been listening to dan carlin (dancarlin.com )
        independent voice,seems to have a handle on change.
        worth a listen.

  5. Anonymous | Jun 7, 2011 at 7:32 pm |

    It’s like promoting vegan-ism at a meat packers convention…

    Go Bernie Sanders! Sell that blood soaked tofu…

  6. GoodDoktorBad | Jun 7, 2011 at 3:32 pm |

    It’s like promoting vegan-ism at a meat packers convention…

    Go Bernie Sanders! Sell that blood soaked tofu…

  7. Anonymous | Jun 7, 2011 at 10:48 pm |

    Yes, and unfortunately it’s the average American who’s been packing all the meat . . .

  8. Anonymous | Jun 7, 2011 at 11:05 pm |

    The average American IS the meat….

  9. E.B. Wolf | Jun 8, 2011 at 12:12 am |

    No way that would be allowed to happen.

  10. Maskedimposter13 | Jun 8, 2011 at 4:37 am |

    He’s not entirely clarifying what he means. I wish he used more clear vocabulary/stats. When you get a tax refund, you could have simply overpaid your taxes to begin with. For example I could have 10 billion worth of taxes due, I pay 50 billion, then I’ll get a 40 billion refund. Corporations do have to pay their taxes quarterly as opposed to annually. However, it is unlikely that a corporation would overpay it’s taxes to that magnitude, as it would want to use that money for other investments/liquidity. So I would like to know how that refund is being generated. Are they getting huge tax credits? Are they refundable or non-refundable tax credits, and what are they for?

    Simply, I’d like to know how much the companies pay in taxes in a year, then how much they get back. Then I would know the difference of what the government actually kept in taxes. This guy is leaving out that amount, and therefor his words have no meaning to me. I want all the information, not just the part that makes me lean to his point.

  11. Maskedimposter13 | Jun 8, 2011 at 12:37 am |

    He’s not entirely clarifying what he means. I wish he used more clear vocabulary/stats. When you get a tax refund, you could have simply overpaid your taxes to begin with. For example I could have 10 billion worth of taxes due, I pay 50 billion, then I’ll get a 40 billion refund. Corporations do have to pay their taxes quarterly as opposed to annually. However, it is unlikely that a corporation would overpay it’s taxes to that magnitude, as it would want to use that money for other investments/liquidity. So I would like to know how that refund is being generated. Are they getting huge tax credits? Are they refundable or non-refundable tax credits, and what are they for?

    Simply, I’d like to know how much the companies pay in taxes in a year, then how much they get back. Then I would know the difference of what the government actually kept in taxes. This guy is leaving out that amount, and therefor his words have no meaning to me. I want all the information, not just the part that makes me lean to his point.

  12. Anonymous | Jun 8, 2011 at 3:23 pm |

    Unfortunately you’re spot on there–Sanders himself has explicitly stated his preference for retirement rather than presidential ambitions.

    While working up a think piece recently about the legacies of selected Founding Fathers, I considered the differences in the various roles of president/party chief/cabinet member.  Jefferson was kind of an anomoly in that he filled all three positions.  Washington was never really a party chief or cabinet member.  Adams was never really a party chief.  And the guy who comes closest, in my mind, to being Jefferson’s ideological counter-part, Alexander Hamilton, was never president, being a filthy foreign-born type.

    Undeniably the president has a key role to fill, but it’s much less important than most people think.  It’s a role that’s probably suited for a more muscular, less intelligent person who can count on a brilliant cabinet and legislative caucus to do most of the blocking and tackling.

  13. Anonymous | Jun 8, 2011 at 3:27 pm |

    and therein lies the problem.
    i have been listening to dan carlin (dancarlin.com )
    independent voice,seems to have a handle on change.
    worth a listen.

  14. Anonymous | Jun 8, 2011 at 3:29 pm |

    Maybe that’s a little unnecessarily symantic.  Everyone knows that there are a host of refundable tax credits that can result in payment to the filer well in excess of any original tax paid.

  15. Sterg195846 | Jun 10, 2011 at 7:25 pm |

    I love my country but out government is so screwed up. When will the average American say enough is enough!!!

  16. Sterg195846 | Jun 10, 2011 at 3:25 pm |

    I love my country but out government is so screwed up. When will the average American say enough is enough!!!

Comments are closed.