Implanted Electrodes Loaded With Drugs Could Monitor Brain And Treat It When Necessary

Clockwork Eyes… I see no possible way which this could be abused (prepare your tinfoil hats, folks). Clay Dillow writes for Popular Science:

Microelectrode arrays implanted in the brain monitor neurological conditions in living patients all the time, sometimes even influencing brain activity if it gets out of line. So, thought researchers at the University of Pittsburgh, why not load one up with drugs so it can deliver chemical therapy to problem sites immediately upon detecting an issue?

The team is developing a new polymer-coated electrode that can both monitor and treat a patient immediately, a capability that could be life-changing — or even life-saving — for those living with conditions like epilepsy. Their device is basically a microelectrode like any other, but it has been covered in a conductive polypyrrole film. Chambers in the film are loaded up with different drugs and neurotransmitters like dopamine or GABA.

For more information, see original article.

7 Comments on "Implanted Electrodes Loaded With Drugs Could Monitor Brain And Treat It When Necessary"

  1. Anonymous | Jun 12, 2011 at 8:02 am |

    “The team is developing a new polymer-coated electrode that can both monitor and treat a patient immediately, a capability that could be life-changing — or even life-saving — for those living with conditions like epilepsy.”
    That sounds nice, except that if the epilepsy is caused by aspartame or other drugs and/or can be treatable in any other way this could preclude ever actually fixing the problem

  2. Anonymous | Jun 12, 2011 at 8:02 am |

    “The team is developing a new polymer-coated electrode that can both monitor and treat a patient immediately, a capability that could be life-changing — or even life-saving — for those living with conditions like epilepsy.”
    That sounds nice, except that if the epilepsy is caused by aspartame or other drugs and/or can be treatable in any other way this could preclude ever actually fixing the problem

  3. JoiquimCouteau | Jun 12, 2011 at 4:02 am |

    “The team is developing a new polymer-coated electrode that can both monitor and treat a patient immediately, a capability that could be life-changing — or even life-saving — for those living with conditions like epilepsy.”
    That sounds nice, except that if the epilepsy is caused by aspartame or other drugs and/or can be treatable in any other way this could preclude ever actually fixing the problem

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  6. Navysealteam7 | Jun 14, 2011 at 9:11 pm |

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  7. Navysealteam7 | Jun 14, 2011 at 5:11 pm |

    Hey look! A Happy-Helmet!!! 😀 Happy-happy, joy-joy!!!

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