Japanese Elders Volunteer For Fukushima ‘Suicide Corp’

The Raw Story reports:

As roughly 450 workers remain at the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant in Japan, the world watches with increasing anxiety at what will become of them.

Unable to take the suspense and the guilt at being among those who promoted the reactors to begin with, a group of Japanese seniors have stepped up to offer their services to their country one last time.

Called the “suicide corps” by one official, they say all they want to do is be of service if the jobs might risk the lives of younger people. While the government hasn’t yet said whether they would be used for any such purpose, talks were reportedly underway.

34 Comments on "Japanese Elders Volunteer For Fukushima ‘Suicide Corp’"

  1. This is somehow beautiful

  2. Marssuit | Jun 2, 2011 at 6:46 pm |

    This is somehow beautiful

  3. Anonymous | Jun 2, 2011 at 11:38 pm |

    The Japanese people have always been willing to make sacrifices for each other. Some of their traditions may seem extreme to westerners but their spirit is very noble, honorable and it insures their very survival.

    It would be nice if we had that kind of social solidarity here in the US. There is some, but not nearly enough… 

  4. GoodDoktorBad | Jun 2, 2011 at 7:38 pm |

    The Japanese people have always been willing to make sacrifices for each other. Some of their traditions may seem extreme to westerners but their spirit is very noble, honorable and it insures their very survival.

    It would be nice if we had that kind of social solidarity here in the US. There is some, but not nearly enough… 

    • Well to be objective, the suicide rate is really high in Japan due to a lot of factors. The offer is a good and logical one, but the drive behind it could be as simple as self blame. Since, in their mind, the melt down is their fault, they deserve to die for it. That’s a strong point in their culture if anything.

      Aside from that I’m not entirely sure we wouldn’t have our own group of people willing to do this if a similar situation occurred in the US. Sure a lot of things suck here, but we’re not totally morally bankrupt either.

      • Syber_punk | Jun 3, 2011 at 12:37 pm |

        are we forgetting about he 9/11 firefighters that knew going into the towers that dark day that chances were the were not going to come out… Americans have a selective memory to much media is the problem

        • GoodDoktorBad | Jun 3, 2011 at 2:42 pm |

          No, we’re not forgetting. Of course there are alot of good people everywhere willing to sacrifice for others.
          The article was about Japan remember? Don’t get your panties in a bunch.

      • GoodDoktorBad | Jun 3, 2011 at 2:59 pm |

        It seems that the Japanese (and others) take failure and mistakes pretty hard. A certain cultural bias toward 
        discipline and perfectionism both serves to create great achievements and gut wrenching failures. 

        As you say, it can be a strong point, but it can also be a point of weakness depending on how much people choose to kick themselves (ie. “the suicide rate is really high in Japan”) rather than learn from their mistakes and move on. 

        Mistakes are shunned and the perpetrators shamed. This is largely self defeating since mistakes and failures are actually the same as the scientific method of trial and error. It is essentially the only way mankind has ever learned to do anything.

        • you guys are talking about it like it’s harikari or something… geez.. so dramatic.

          • People choosing to offer up their life is very serious. In a way, yes it is a modern harikari. Just because it doesn’t literally involve spilling your guts on the floor doesn’t make it any less symbolic of an act.

          • GoodDoktorBad | Jun 7, 2011 at 6:51 pm |

            Not nearly as quick and relatively painless compared to a slow agonizing death from radiation exposure…
            Frankly its far more dramatic than Harikari.

  5. Ronniedobbs | Jun 3, 2011 at 12:52 am |

    american ceos could learn something from this….

  6. Ronniedobbs | Jun 2, 2011 at 8:52 pm |

    american ceos could learn something from this….

  7. Anonymous | Jun 3, 2011 at 12:57 am |

    Don’t hold your breath…

  8. Hadrian999 | Jun 3, 2011 at 1:05 am |

    good for them the straw death is no way to go, dieing on your feet is the best way, fighting for something

  9. Hadrian999 | Jun 2, 2011 at 9:05 pm |

    good for them the straw death is no way to go, dieing on your feet is the best way, fighting for something

  10. jelyfish | Jun 3, 2011 at 1:48 am |

    Propaganda piece… Plain and simple. 

  11. jelyfish | Jun 2, 2011 at 9:48 pm |

    Propaganda piece… Plain and simple. 

  12. Hadrian999 | Jun 3, 2011 at 6:34 am |

    for what exactly?

  13. Anonymous | Jun 3, 2011 at 7:59 am |

    Well to be objective, the suicide rate is really high in Japan due to a lot of factors. The offer is a good and logical one, but the drive behind it could be as simple as self blame. Since, in their mind, the melt down is their fault, they deserve to die for it. That’s a strong point in their culture if anything.

    Aside from that I’m not entirely sure we wouldn’t have our own group of people willing to do this if a similar situation occurred in the US. Sure a lot of things suck here, but we’re not totally morally bankrupt either.

  14. Mr. Coffee | Jun 3, 2011 at 12:48 pm |

    Patriots.

    America, learn to fucking play.

  15. Mr. Coffee | Jun 3, 2011 at 8:48 am |

    Patriots.

    America, learn to fucking play.

  16. justagirl | Jun 3, 2011 at 2:08 pm |

    wow.  in america, all we have to worry about is renewing senior driver’s licenses.  can you imagine?  

  17. justagirl | Jun 3, 2011 at 10:08 am |

    wow.  in america, all we have to worry about is renewing senior driver’s licenses.  can you imagine?  

  18. Syber_punk | Jun 3, 2011 at 4:37 pm |

    are we forgetting about he 9/11 firefighters that knew going into the towers that dark day that chances were the were not going to come out… Americans have a selective memory to much media is the problem

  19. yeah what to you mean? because of Japan in WWII? get real!

  20. Anonymous | Jun 3, 2011 at 6:42 pm |

    No, we’re not forgetting. Of course there are alot of good people everywhere willing to sacrifice for others.
    The article was about Japan remember? Don’t get your panties in a bunch.

  21. Anonymous | Jun 3, 2011 at 6:59 pm |

    It seems that the Japanese (and others) take failure and mistakes pretty hard. A certain cultural bias toward 
    discipline and perfectionism both serves to create great achievements and gut wrenching failures. 

    As you say, it can be a strong point, but it can also be a point of weakness depending on how much people choose to kick themselves rather than learn from their mistakes and move on. 

    Mistakes are shunned and the perpetrators shamed. This is largely self defeating since mistakes and failures are actually the same as the scientific method of trial and error. It is essentially the only way mankind has ever learned to do anything. 

  22. you guys are talking about it like it’s harikari or something… geez.. so dramatic.

  23. Anonymous | Jun 5, 2011 at 11:29 am |

    People choosing to offer up their life is very serious. In a way, yes it is a modern harikari. Just because it doesn’t literally involve spilling your guts on the floor doesn’t make it any less symbolic of an act.

  24. Anonymous | Jun 7, 2011 at 10:51 pm |

    Not nearly as quick and relatively painless compared to a slow agonizing death from radiation exposure…
    Frankly its far more dramatic than Harikari.

Comments are closed.