Psychic Fiasco: Texas Mass Murder Raid a Hoax

Mass GraveBenjamin Radford writes in Discovery News:

A psychic called police on Monday night, describing a horrific scene of mass murder: 25 to 30 dismembered bodies near an unassuming ranch house about an hour outside of Houston, Texas. There were rotting limbs, headless corpses, and, chillingly, many were children.

Deputies from the Liberty County Sheriff’s office went to investigate but didn’t see anything amiss.

The psychic called a second time the next day, insisting that her visions were true. She provided more detailed information about the home and urged the police to return to a different part of the property. This time detectives called for backup and soon dozens of officials from the Texas Department of Public Safety, the FBI, and the Texas Rangers were on the scene — not to mention cadaver dogs, news helicopters, and gawkers.

Police investigated, and it all turned out to be a false alarm. There were no dead bodies; the psychic was wrong (or lying).

How could one anonymous psychic have been taken so seriously by the police, FBI, and Texas Rangers? According to an Associated Press story

For more information, see original article.

26 Comments on "Psychic Fiasco: Texas Mass Murder Raid a Hoax"

  1. Anonymous | Jun 12, 2011 at 12:15 am |

    I see what the problem is here. Clearly this psychic didn’t pay the twenty five dollar fee for the degree from the Psychic Detective School. You have to go through the proper channels and use the ad in the comic book or you can’t say you’re a psychic detective!

  2. I see what the problem is here. Clearly this psychic didn’t pay the twenty five dollar fee for the degree from the Psychic Detective School. You have to go through the proper channels and use the ad in the comic book or you can’t say you’re a psychic detective!

  3. Hadrian999 | Jun 12, 2011 at 12:58 am |

    wonder if it was a cop in need of some overtime

  4. Hadrian999 | Jun 11, 2011 at 8:58 pm |

    wonder if it was a cop in need of some overtime

  5. what’s the chance this was a case of attempted vengeance by a jilted girlfriend?

  6. what’s the chance this was a case of attempted vengeance by a jilted girlfriend?

  7. Grooveboss | Jun 12, 2011 at 4:06 am |

    he was predicting the future

  8. Grooveboss | Jun 12, 2011 at 4:06 am |

    he was predicting the future

  9. Grooveboss | Jun 12, 2011 at 4:06 am |

    he was predicting the future

  10. Grooveboss | Jun 12, 2011 at 12:06 am |

    he was predicting the future

  11. “How could one anonymous psychic have been taken so seriously by the police, FBI, and Texas Rangers?”

    Is it really any surprise that the state with the most anti-science school boards in the country has taken to using magic to fight crime? 

  12. “How could one anonymous psychic have been taken so seriously by the police, FBI, and Texas Rangers?”

    Is it really any surprise that the state with the most anti-science school boards in the country has taken to using magic to fight crime? 

    • well, for starters, texas rangers have to have a bachelors degree as a prerequisite, as do fbi agents. also, most fbi agents are stationed at certain headquarters across the nation by needs of the fbi, therefore, they could easily be from new york, california, virginia, or any other state for that matter. when i was coming up in school in texas, most people did well in science and they also expressed a healthy intrest in the unknown. i am sure you are not one of those people.

      • “expressed a healthy intrest in the unknown. i am sure you are not one of those people.”

        No, I think law enforcement should operate upon principles of evidence and deduction. I guess I’m just not as cutting-edge as these guys are. 

        • Omghaxkidz | Jun 12, 2011 at 8:23 pm |

          It’s not about evidence and deduction. If someone calls 911 and says a crime has taken place, it has to be investigated whether the police like it or not. They can’t just say “dude naw, I’m not going to that last call because she’s crazy as a loon”.

  13. well, for starters, texas rangers have to have a bachelors degree as a prerequisite, as do fbi agents. also, most fbi agents are stationed at certain headquarters across the nation by needs of the fbi, therefore, they could easily be from new york, california, virginia, or any other state for that matter. when i was coming up in school in texas, most people did well in science and they also expressed a healthy intrest in the unknown. i am sure you are not one of those people.

  14. IrishPotatoGun | Jun 12, 2011 at 1:34 pm |

    Just had the wrong place, this actually is happening in Libya  just with NATO air strikes.

  15. IrishPotatoGun | Jun 12, 2011 at 9:34 am |

    Just had the wrong place, this actually is happening in Libya  just with NATO air strikes.

  16. “expressed a healthy intrest in the unknown. i am sure you are not one of those people.”

    No, I think law enforcement should operate upon principles of evidence and deduction. I guess I’m just not as cutting-edge as these guys are. 

  17. Hadrian999 | Jun 12, 2011 at 8:51 pm |

    if police who took the call weren’t total yokels they should have traced the 2nd call, anyone with inside info on a crime has to be treated as a suspect, i say bill the idiot

  18. Hadrian999 | Jun 12, 2011 at 4:51 pm |

    if police who took the call weren’t total yokels they should have traced the 2nd call, anyone with inside info on a crime has to be treated as a suspect, i say bill the idiot

  19. Omghaxkidz | Jun 13, 2011 at 12:23 am |

    It’s not about evidence and deduction. If someone calls 911 and says a crime has taken place, it has to be investigated whether the police like it or not. They can’t just say “dude naw, I’m not going to that last call because she’s crazy as a loon”.

  20. Is she auditioning for Becks TV spot?

  21. bozodeathgod | Jun 13, 2011 at 10:06 pm |

    Is she auditioning for Becks TV spot?

  22. Wow, psychic probable cause. Just mix in a little precognition and the office of pre-crime will be humming right along.

  23. Marklar_Prime | Jun 14, 2011 at 12:45 am |

    Wow, psychic probable cause. Just mix in a little precognition and the office of pre-crime will be humming right along.

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