The Hackers Strike Back (Against Corporations)

somehwat-mad-completely-mad-u-mad-MADAD_reasonably_smallWhatever your view of the ethics of hacking, it’s hard to find much sympathy for the large corporations that have recently been the victims of successful hacks. The International Business Times reports on how corporations are now running scared.

Hacker attacks, real and fake claims on who hacked and who didn’t, and to top it all, speculation regarding who is going to be the next target. While distressed corporations that have been victims of these virtual hooligans in recent days struggle to restore order and gain back control over the dwindling shares, people across the world debate on the next likely target.

Hours after PlayStation Network was made available after a shutdown which lasted more than a month, Sony’s security system was reported to be breached by the hacker group LulzSec. The group claimed to have accessed over a million user accounts along with passwords stored in servers. The group, in their supposed attempt to reveal the loopholes in Sony’s security system, has made available the data they dug up online from Sonypictures.com.

Sony’s shares have been steadily going down as unfortunate events kept happening including the disastrous Japan earth quake, back to back security breaches and accusations of covering up the hacking attempt. As the corporate giant was almost looking up from its ruins, with yesterday’s announcement of the PSN restart, the news spread that critical data have been stolen by the LulzSec who were in news for PBS hack attack.

LulzSec, who weren’t happy with the flagship show of PBS, Wikisecrets, which showed WikiLeaks in unfavorable light, hacked the broadcasting service and posted false news of the dead rapper Tupac being alive in New Zealand.

The group is apparently focusing on and issued threatening statements to Sony saying that the new hacking attempt is “beginning of the end” for Sony. The exact plan of the group hasn’t been brought to light yet.

LulzSec tweeted, “Hey @Sony, you know we’re making off with a bunch of your internal stuff right now and you haven’t even noticed? Slow and steady, guys.”

As the Japanese corporation is finding their way in dark, Google announced a phishing attack on June 1st, allegedly carried out by Chinese hackers, which reportedly compromised high profile US accounts belonging to politicians, military persons and activists…

[continues at International Business Times]

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  • Tech95

    This is so unpatriotic I’m going to hang my flag halfway.

  • Tech95

    This is so unpatriotic I’m going to hang my flag halfway.

    • nevertrusta3sum

      I don’t really think everyone in Lulzsec is from the US.. and it’s called half mast or half-staff. Sony is a Japanese company. If you are implying in any way that is anti-american, you are a fucking tool. I hope you are being fatuously sarcastic with this remark. Otherwise, you are a ‘Merican, not a patriotic citizen. Dissent is patriotic not flag waving. If you are implying in any way that is anti-american, you are a fucking tool.

  • Tio Holtzman

    So, am I the only one that believes that these “hackers” are just state-sponsored individuals meant cause a ruckus in order to expedite the implementation of draconian measures on the Interwebs?  Nah, couldn’t be.

  • Tio Holtzman

    So, am I the only one that believes that these “hackers” are just state-sponsored individuals meant cause a ruckus in order to expedite the implementation of draconian measures on the Interwebs?  Nah, couldn’t be.

    • quartz99

      While the thought had crossed my mind, I think you give the state too much credit. There’s a corollary to “never attribute to malice what can be attributed to stupidity” and that’s “never attribute to malice alone what can be attributed to malice caused by someone else’s stupidity and incompetence.” Incompetence? That’s Sony. Plaintext passwords… still? Really Sony? You had the whole system down for a month and you didn’t implement some kind of password encryption? It’s not that hard. Really, it isn’t.

      This is some group of scriptkiddies thinking they’re sticking it to “The Man” so they can brag about it, but the real victims are people who have used Sony services (like me). Now, I don’t use the same user/pass everywhere, but lots of people do because it’s hard to remember the fifty to a hundred usernames and passwords you need today. As it is, I’m a highly technically savvy user and I still only have about five usernames and passwords that I use across the board. I spent just under an hour last night trying to remember everywhere I might have used that username so I could change any using that password. Just think what a less savvy user might do? How many people do you think use the same user/pass on their bank website? for other game sites? And that’s before you even get to the fact that most people with a sony account had to give them a credit card number, which is also now available on Pirate Bay (thankfully I did not). And how many of those people do you think will never even know this happened until someone’s charging thousands of dollars on their cards?

      Besides, Sony’s not an American company, even if most of their customers are in the States. If the US was going to send hackers against companies to justify new laws about regulating the Internet, they’d look for a target that everyone in the US uses, like Google or Facebook. Of course, Sony’s an easy target (apparently) and Google is not, but I guarantee that the only people who _really_ care about the Sony mess are Sony customers, which is not a majority of the country. A big chunk, but nowhere near enough to justify new laws. Most of the country won’t even hear about this, and less will understand what it means or why it’s bad.

      However, I’ll be very surprised if the govt. doesn’t try to capitalize on it anyway. They don’t have to have been the cause to try to take advantage of it… if I thought there was anyone there making up those kind of strategies who understood the Internet I might even be worried about it…

      Edit to add: Actually, if they implemented a law saying that it was a federal crime to store credit card numbers and passwords in plaintext, I might even get behind a little new regulation, provided it didn’t reach any farther than that. To not encrypt these things is a level of negligence that really _should_ be considered criminal.

      • Devnull

        script kiddies? give them some respect, they’ve pulled off some seriously nice hacks.

        This all seems to be part of the bigger picture with wikileaks et al – a new glasnost, an age of awareness. Centralized power structures are falling apart as the secrets they need to maintain power are laid bare. Resilient decentralized systems appear in their place (check out the explosion in bitcoin value!).

        • Kjsfdkjf

          apologist… it would be seriously nice if they would have ripped off the corporation itself and not its customers… 

        • quartz99

          Respect?

          If they’d defaced some Sony sites and done things that only affected Sony, then sent Sony a message that said “This is exactly how we did it. You have ninety days to fix your security or we’ll do it again.” …then they might deserve a little respect. Maybe.

          But they aren’t hurting Sony directly. They’re going after Sony’s customers and contributing to them having their identities stolen, which can completely destroy your life if you’re too poor to fight it, by keeping you from getting a good job (employers usually check credit scores), by keeping you from being able to get a car or house loan, by opening cards in your name and repeatedly maxing them… people whose main effect is that? They deserve no respect. They deserve jail time and I hope that anyone whose information has been used in that way manages to scrape together the money to sue the fuck out of them to recoup the costs of dealing with the identity theft.

          Edit to add — considering how basic the hack apparently was, I still think “scriptkiddies” is an apt description.

    • Blur

      if the govt were to go thru with legislation after a corporation being attacked, that would just be too out-in-the-open for them and would let us all know that it is the corporations that really run things in this country and they would never want us to really *know* that.  

      and on the whole tupac-being-alive thing, i wouldn’t be surprised if this becomes more frequent with that new 2pac movie being talked about… 

  • Anonymous

    While the thought had crossed my mind, I think you give the state too much credit. There’s a corollary to “never attribute to malice what can be attributed to stupidity” and that’s “never attribute to malice alone what can be attributed to malice caused by someone else’s stupidity and incompetence.” Incompetence? That’s Sony. Plaintext passwords… still? Really Sony? You had the whole system down for a month and you didn’t implement some kind of password encryption? It’s not that hard. Really, it isn’t.

    This is some group of scriptkiddies thinking they’re sticking it to “The Man” so they can brag about it, but the real victims are people who have used Sony services (like me). Now, I don’t use the same user/pass everywhere, but lots of people do because it’s hard to remember the fifty to a hundred usernames and passwords you need today. As it is, I’m a highly technically savvy user and I still only have about five usernames and passwords that I use across the board. I spent just under an hour last night trying to remember everywhere I might have used that username so I could change any using that password. Just think what a less savvy user might do? How many people do you think use the same user/pass on their bank website? for other game sites? And that’s before you even get to the fact that most people with a sony account had to give them a credit card number, which is also now available on Pirate Bay (thankfully I did not). And how many of those people do you think will never even know this happened until someone’s charging thousands of dollars on their cards?

    Besides, Sony’s not an American company, even if most of their customers are in the States. If the US was going to send hackers against companies to justify new laws about regulating the Internet, they’d look for a target that everyone in the US uses, like Google or Facebook. Of course, Sony’s an easy target (apparently) and Google is not, but I guarantee that the only people who _really_ care about the Sony mess are Sony customers, which is not a majority of the country. A big chunk, but nowhere near enough to justify new laws. Most of the country won’t even hear about this, and less will understand what it means or why it’s bad.

    However, I’ll be very surprised if the govt. doesn’t try to capitalize on it anyway. They don’t have to have been the cause to try to take advantage of it… if I thought there was anyone there making up those kind of strategies who understood the Internet I might even be worried about it…

  • Grooveboss

    Hacker is scary and powerful I give you that, but what I am really scared of is the TROLLS, they don’t hurt your networks they go straight to your feelings.     The only way counter act the is with positive word like BRILLIANT!!!

  • Grooveboss

    Hacker is scary and powerful I give you that, but what I am really scared of is the TROLLS, they don’t hurt your networks they go straight to your feelings.     The only way counter act the is with positive word like BRILLIANT!!!

  • Guest

    Jesus Christ on a fucking cracker!

    I am getting pretty annoyed hearing about all of these idiotic self-righteous attacks against Sony just because people can’t put Linux on their PS3s. (at least, that’s what I thought spawned all of this, if not, then please ignore this statement)

    If hackers want to hurt Sony, and by extension (in their heads anyway) appear as the brave hero standing up to a giant evil entity, why the hell are they going after people’s personal information? That will only make consumers hate hackers, which, in the gaming world people do anyway because they completely ruin any enjoyment anyone can glean from the game, instead of the corporation we’re supposed to be leery of. 

    Maybe Tio Holtzman is right, though. It wouldn’t surprise me.

  • Mr Willow

    Jesus Christ on a fucking cracker!

    I am getting pretty annoyed hearing about all of these idiotic self-righteous attacks against Sony just because people can’t put Linux on their PS3s. (at least, that’s what I thought spawned all of this, if not, then please ignore this statement)

    If hackers want to hurt Sony, and by extension (in their heads anyway) appear as the brave hero standing up to a giant evil entity, why the hell are they going after people’s personal information? That will only make consumers hate hackers, which, in the gaming world people do anyway because they completely ruin any enjoyment anyone can glean from the game, instead of the corporation we’re supposed to be leery of. 

    Maybe Tio Holtzman is right, though. It wouldn’t surprise me.

  • Devnull

    script kiddies? give them some respect, they’ve pulled off some seriously nice hacks.

    This all seems to be part of the bigger picture with wikileaks et al – a new glasnost, an age of awareness. Centralized power structures are falling apart as the secrets they need to maintain power are laid bare. Resilient decentralized systems appear in their place (check out the explosion in bitcoin value!).

  • nevertrusta3sum

    I don’t really think everyone in Lulzsec is from the US.. and it’s called half mast or half-staff. Sony is a Japanese company. If you are implying in any way that is anti-american, you are a fucking tool. I hope you are being fatuously sarcastic with this remark. Otherwise, you are a ‘Merican, not a patriotic citizen. Dissent is patriotic not flag waving. If you are implying in any way that is anti-american, you are a fucking tool.

  • Kjsfdkjf

    apologist… it would be seriously nice if they would have ripped off the corporation itself and not its customers… 

  • Blur

    if the govt were to go thru with legislation after a corporation being attacked, that would just be too out-in-the-open for them and would let us all know that it is the corporations that really run things in this country and they would never want us to really *know* that.  

    and on the whole tupac-being-alive thing, i wouldn’t be surprised if this becomes more frequent with that new 2pac movie being talked about… 

  • Anonymous

    Respect?

    If they’d defaced some Sony sites and done things that only affected Sony, then sent Sony a message that said “This is exactly how we did it. You have ninety days to fix your security or we’ll do it again.” …then they might deserve a little respect. Maybe.

    But they aren’t hurting Sony directly. They’re going after Sony’s customers and contributing to them having their identities stolen, which can completely destroy your life if you’re too poor to fight it, by keeping you from getting a good job (employers usually check credit scores), by keeping you from being able to get a car or house loan, by opening cards in your name and repeatedly maxing them… people whose main effect is that? They deserve no respect. They deserve jail time and I hope that anyone whose information has been used in that way manages to scrape together the money to sue the fuck out of them to recoup the costs of dealing with the identity theft.

  • downtempo

    LulzSec are attacking in response to to Sony suing a kid who modify his OWN property. 

  • downtempo

    LulzSec are attacking in response to to Sony suing a kid who modify his OWN property. 

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