Early Humans Likely Practiced Ritualistic Cannibalism

CannibalsTo be fair, 30,000 years ago, there were few other recreational activities to occupy one’s spare time. The Archaeology News Network writes:

Archaeologists have found 32,000-year-old human remains in southeastern Europe, which suggest that the earliest humans practiced “mortuary” or “ritual” cannibalism.

The excavated human remains, the oldest known in Europe, were found at a shelter-cave site called Buran-Kaya III in Ukraine and exhibit post-mortem cut marks, the MSNBC reports. “Our observations show a post-mortem treatment of human corpses including the selection of the skull,” said the paleozoologist and archaeologist at the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, Stephane Pean.

However, Pean said that the treatment of the human bodies, which came with ornaments, did not follow nutritional purposes, rejecting the possibility of dietary cannibalism.

“Observed treatment of the human body, together with the presence of body ornaments, indicates rather a mortuary ritual: either a ritual cannibalism or a specific mortuary practice for secondary disposal,” he described.

34 Comments on "Early Humans Likely Practiced Ritualistic Cannibalism"

  1. Bigdickmegaherz | Jul 15, 2011 at 6:21 pm |

    I find this sexually arousing. Did you know aborigines used to call the white man long pigs? Supposedly Europeans taste like pork.

  2. Bigdickmegaherz | Jul 15, 2011 at 6:21 pm |

    I find this sexually arousing. Did you know aborigines used to call the white man long pigs? Supposedly Europeans taste like pork.

  3. Bigdickmegaherz | Jul 15, 2011 at 6:21 pm |

    I find this sexually arousing. Did you know aborigines used to call the white man long pigs? Supposedly Europeans taste like pork.

  4. Bigdickmegaherz | Jul 15, 2011 at 2:21 pm |

    I find this sexually arousing. Did you know aborigines used to call the white man long pigs? Supposedly Europeans taste like pork.

  5. wizard troll | Jul 15, 2011 at 6:27 pm |

    Fat kids beware. Heed this warning 

  6. wizard troll | Jul 15, 2011 at 2:27 pm |

    Fat kids beware. Heed this warning 

  7. Anonymous | Jul 15, 2011 at 6:42 pm |

    Well of course.  What would you call the Christian Eucharist but a ritual re-enactment of a cannibal feast?

  8. Liam_McGonagle | Jul 15, 2011 at 2:42 pm |

    Well of course.  What would you call the Christian Eucharist but a ritual re-enactment of a cannibal feast?

  9. Anonymous | Jul 15, 2011 at 6:47 pm |

    this reeks of typical euro centric archeological practice wherein the standard paradigm is civilisation vs barbarity.

    anyone who has taken aboriginal studies knows this is not a new idea. it has been used against indigenous cultures as an excuse and a reason for colonialism for about 500 years. Longer if you count how in medieval scholarship and travel writing they used to charge the same thing against  non-romanised peoples east of the danube.

    if you are skeptical that this theory could have political implications- just remember 70 yrs ago, when they discovered (quote unquote) lascaux in france- most scholars at the time refused to accept the implication of  advanced social organisation and language among pre-historic people. (As if the greeks had a  monopoly on art and politics). in fact most mainstream scholars refused to accept they had pre-historic origins.

    The british while developing the field of anthropology and sociology during their initial colonisation in india, decried this and other “barbaric” practices as something their anglo-saxon protestantism could alleviate.

    I love the study of history, mythology and culture, but i remain deeply skeptical about this sort of speculative non-holistic methodology.

  10. Jin The Ninja | Jul 15, 2011 at 2:47 pm |

    this reeks of typical euro centric archeological practice wherein the standard paradigm is civilisation vs barbarity.

    anyone who has taken aboriginal studies knows this is not a new idea. it has been used against indigenous cultures as an excuse and a reason for colonialism for about 500 years. Longer if you count how in medieval scholarship and travel writing they used to charge the same thing against  non-romanised peoples east of the danube.

    if you are skeptical that this theory could have political implications- just remember 70 yrs ago, when they discovered (quote unquote) lascaux in france- most scholars at the time refused to accept the implication of  advanced social organisation and language among pre-historic people. (As if the greeks had a  monopoly on art and politics). in fact most mainstream scholars refused to accept they had pre-historic origins.

    The british while developing the field of anthropology and sociology during their initial colonisation in india, decried this and other “barbaric” practices as something their anglo-saxon protestantism could alleviate.

    I love the study of history, mythology and culture, but i remain deeply skeptical about this sort of speculative non-holistic methodology.

  11. Anarchy Wolf | Jul 15, 2011 at 8:03 pm |

    Yes I’m sure that this means every society everywhere were totally cannibal savages before the rise of enlightening civilization.

    Grow up dude. Let go of those preconceived notions.

  12. Anarchy Pony | Jul 15, 2011 at 4:03 pm |

    Yes I’m sure that this means every society everywhere were totally cannibal savages before the rise of enlightening civilization.

    Grow up dude. Let go of those preconceived notions.

  13. Anarchy Wolf | Jul 15, 2011 at 8:04 pm |

    Well, many europeans are rather pigly.

  14. Anonymous | Jul 15, 2011 at 11:09 pm |

    I can only hope that future historians will come upon that article from a couple years back and conclude that modern humans ‘recreationally’ ate datura and cut off their penises and tongues. 

  15. JoiquimCouteau | Jul 15, 2011 at 7:09 pm |

    I can only hope that future historians will come upon that article from a couple years back and conclude that modern humans ‘recreationally’ ate datura and cut off their penises and tongues. 

  16. Anonymous | Jul 16, 2011 at 1:50 am |

    While I revel in Jin_TheNinja’s delight in “lov(ing) the study of history, mythology and culture” I eagerly await his analysis of the cut marks on the bones and his citations as to standard or even usual cannibal practices drawn from either historical or ethnographic records. Moreover, his nailing of “typical euro centric archaeological practice…civlisation vs barbarity” is also a welcomed revelation except that it has nothing to do with the way even undergrad students have been taught since the 1930s in elite schools and the late 1940s in any average university. Almost a half century ago, it was commonly accepted in my pedestrian undergrad schooling that educated people neither used nor thought in terms like civilised or barbarous. Along with “race””, these are social inventions and not professional. Moreover, despite hotly vocal dissenters, it was believed by the brightest scholars on circumstantial evidence that many Amerindian were cannibals. Decades, law suites & much name calling later, the human coprolite corpus became sufficient to prove that indeed many early Amerindians had DNA pass through their guts which had belonged to many other individuals. This did and doesn’t meant that they were bad people, but simply that they ate one another. This is not the place to address a simplistic view of the British in India, but without British intercession, far, far more would have been lost during the population explosion brought about by European sanitation, but as for Greek superiority, as far back as the 1770s among the French and during the Napoleonic period among the Brits, Egypt was considered the backbone of the West–ever as Herodotus, Plato and Solon had stated. In short, should one take the time to read, a great many of these follies fall by the wayside.

  17. Anonymous | Jul 16, 2011 at 1:50 am |

    While I revel in Jin_TheNinja’s delight in “lov(ing) the study of history, mythology and culture” I eagerly await his analysis of the cut marks on the bones and his citations as to standard or even usual cannibal practices drawn from either historical or ethnographic records. Moreover, his nailing of “typical euro centric archaeological practice…civlisation vs barbarity” is also a welcomed revelation except that it has nothing to do with the way even undergrad students have been taught since the 1930s in elite schools and the late 1940s in any average university. Almost a half century ago, it was commonly accepted in my pedestrian undergrad schooling that educated people neither used nor thought in terms like civilised or barbarous. Along with “race””, these are social inventions and not professional. Moreover, despite hotly vocal dissenters, it was believed by the brightest scholars on circumstantial evidence that many Amerindian were cannibals. Decades, law suites & much name calling later, the human coprolite corpus became sufficient to prove that indeed many early Amerindians had DNA pass through their guts which had belonged to many other individuals. This did and doesn’t meant that they were bad people, but simply that they ate one another. This is not the place to address a simplistic view of the British in India, but without British intercession, far, far more would have been lost during the population explosion brought about by European sanitation, but as for Greek superiority, as far back as the 1770s among the French and during the Napoleonic period among the Brits, Egypt was considered the backbone of the West–ever as Herodotus, Plato and Solon had stated. In short, should one take the time to read, a great many of these follies fall by the wayside.

  18. KewGardensNYC | Jul 15, 2011 at 9:50 pm |

    While I revel in Jin_TheNinja’s delight in “lov(ing) the study of history, mythology and culture” I eagerly await his analysis of the cut marks on the bones and his citations as to standard or even usual cannibal practices drawn from either historical or ethnographic records. Moreover, his nailing of “typical euro centric archaeological practice…civlisation vs barbarity” is also a welcomed revelation except that it has nothing to do with the way even undergrad students have been taught since the 1930s in elite schools and the late 1940s in any average university. Almost a half century ago, it was commonly accepted in my pedestrian undergrad schooling that educated people neither used nor thought in terms like civilised or barbarous. Along with “race””, these are social inventions and not professional. Moreover, despite hotly vocal dissenters, it was believed by the brightest scholars on circumstantial evidence that many Amerindian were cannibals. Decades, law suites & much name calling later, the human coprolite corpus became sufficient to prove that indeed many early Amerindians had DNA pass through their guts which had belonged to many other individuals. This did and doesn’t meant that they were bad people, but simply that they ate one another. This is not the place to address a simplistic view of the British in India, but without British intercession, far, far more would have been lost during the population explosion brought about by European sanitation, but as for Greek superiority, as far back as the 1770s among the French and during the Napoleonic period among the Brits, Egypt was considered the backbone of the West–ever as Herodotus, Plato and Solon had stated. In short, should one take the time to read, a great many of these follies fall by the wayside.

    • Jin The Ninja | Jul 16, 2011 at 12:51 am |

      If you had a reply to my specific comment, you should have hit the “reply” button… but since you did not, i will leave you the space for your thoughts without rhetort (either witty or informed).

  19. Anonymous | Jul 16, 2011 at 4:51 am |

    If you had a reply to my specific comment, you should hit the “reply” button…

  20. Another reason to hate religion, amright atheists?

  21. Another reason to hate religion, amright atheists?

    • The_Baffler | Jul 16, 2011 at 3:56 pm |

      I don’t hate religion, I just hate the people who use it to justify being assholes.

    • Because they didn’t believe in wasting perfectly good meat? It’s a different culture with different taboos, ritual cannibalism isn’t quite the same as raising people as cattle. Ever see soylent green? It’s kinda like that.

  22. The Murderer Of Faggots! | Jul 16, 2011 at 4:50 pm |

    Your all fucking faggots that like a cock in the ass!

  23. The Murderer Of Faggots! | Jul 16, 2011 at 4:50 pm |

    Your all fucking faggots that like a cock in the ass!

  24. As then, so today!

  25. jasonpaulhayes | Jul 16, 2011 at 3:17 pm |

    As then, so today!

  26. Anonymous | Jul 16, 2011 at 7:56 pm |

    I don’t hate religion, I just hate the people who use it to justify being assholes.

  27. Anonymous | Jul 16, 2011 at 8:58 pm |

    Because they didn’t believe in wasting perfectly good meat? It’s a different culture with different taboos, ritual cannibalism isn’t quite the same as raising people as cattle. Ever see soylent green? It’s kinda like that.

  28. Anonymous | Jul 17, 2011 at 7:15 am |

    and pigs are one of the dirtiest animals… very fitting for europeans! OUCH!!!!

  29. Comment with cannibalism – http://www.comicbookandmoviereviews.com/2011/07/sagawa-cannibal-that-walked-free.html

Comments are closed.