Thai Elects Yingluck Shinawatra As First Female PM

yingThai lawmakers have voted in their first female prime minister, Yingluck Shinawatra, whose political career began just a few months ago. The Bangkok Post reports:

Pheu Thai Party list MP Yingluck Shinawatra was elected Thailand’s 28th prime minister by a majority vote in the House of Representatives on Friday morning.

A total of 296 MPs voted in support of Ms Yingluck, the country’s first female prime minister, while three Democrat MPs voted against her, with 197 abstentions – including Ms Yingluck, the new  speaker and one of his deputies, and most members of the main opposition parties, the Democrat and Bhumjaithai parties, and  the  four members of the Rak Thailand Party led by Chuvit Kamolvisit.

The three Democrat lawmakers who voted against Ms Yingluck were Boonyod Sukthinthai, Watchara Phetthong and Attaporn Ponlaboot.

The four MPs who did not attend the House meeting today were Ratchadaporn Kaewsanit, Khanchit Thapsuwan, Yukol Chanawatpanya and Sathit Pitutaecha, all Democrats.

[Continues at Bangkok Post]

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  • Anonymous

    I have been hearing a lot about this on CCTV, what’s odd is that her brother the former Prime Minister in in exile right now. So I’m not sure really what the rationale was considering the political turmoil that has been ongoing in Thailand.

    Either way best of luck to her and Thailand.

  • MoralDrift

    I have been hearing a lot about this on CCTV, what’s odd is that her brother the former Prime Minister in in exile right now. So I’m not sure really what the rationale was considering the political turmoil that has been ongoing in Thailand.

    Either way best of luck to her and Thailand.

    • SF2K01

      The rationale is pretty much that “we don’t like the military having so much power” and because people liked her brother. It’s a better rationale than most out there.

  • Anonymous

    well this will be the testing ground of the “red shirts.”

    if they really are a leftist worker’s movement they will re-organise and fight against the entrenched neo-liberal policies that Yingluck will no doubt pursue.

    we’ll see.

  • Jin The Ninja

    well this will be the testing ground of the “red shirts.”

    if they really are a leftist worker’s movement they will re-organise and fight against the entrenched neo-liberal policies that Yingluck will no doubt pursue.

    we’ll see.

    • MoralDrift

      thats what confused me….the “red-shirts” supported her I thought?

      • Jin The Ninja

        They did, but there are two red shirt factions, one is the supposed marxists and the other are the supporters of Thaksin (her brother in exile). The red shirts are the rural people and the urban working poor- Thaksin is corrupt no doubt, but he did promise huge rural infrastructure spending and income stipends for people on the poverty line. He also promised thais, tvs, cell phones and free k-12 education. This obviously bothered the conservative old guard, since thaksin is a telecomm billionaire, and would be posed to collect money from all the cell phones promised to poor people. It’s a very convoluted and not easy to discern…There is no obvious polarisation of the factions or the political parties because all are legally obligated to be pro-monarchy. The monarchy supports the most conservative parties (known colloquially as the yellow shirts), but because there is no real opposition  in parliament- all parties tend to look the same. I can say that Thaksin and Yingluck being ethnic chinese does nothing to endear them to the entrenched old guard.

        • MoralDrift

          Thank you for the enlightening response.

  • Hadrian999

    if we elected an asian cick president then at least i would like something about watching presidential speeches

  • Hadrian999

    if we elected an asian chick president then at least i would like something about watching presidential speeches

    • MoralDrift

      Just move to Asia, and yes she is a quite attractive Prime Minister

      • Hadrian999

        i’m actually thinking about it once i finish up my free education

        • MoralDrift

          I am seriously considering it myself

        • Tuna Ghost

          There’s a ton of teaching opportunities in that part of the world, as long as you have at least a bachelor’s degree and no criminal record.  Actually, as long as you can get a backround check from any state, you’re good to go in that area.  

      • BuzzCoastin

        I left the Homeland of the Free about 10 years ago and have been living in Asia for about 4 years now; I have no complaints. Thailand is a super place, even during the political uprising I never had a problem. However, like everywhere else, politics is synonymous with corruption.

        • Tuna Ghost

          I’ve been considering Thailand once I leave South Korea.  I’ve been there before, but I only got to see Bangkok and Phuket.  Which area would you recommend for living/working?  How are the locals?  You mentioned the corruption, is that something you run into a lot?  

          • Jin The Ninja

            not buzz, but i thought i’d give a crack…

            chiang mai or bangkok for teaching (to make money). if you don’t care so much about money you can get a lower paid post in a rural area (much lower), but in exchange you can get a nice little house (paid for), and you can see how a real village works. Thais are very friendly, if you can get by in Korean society, you’ll have NO problems in thailand. I like korea, but i found it hard to read people. thais are gregarious, unless they really lose it.
            but saving face is a big thing. Northwest has a lot of mining, industrial things, south has occasional seperatist violence but the best food, central is poorest, and bangkok is cool for a spell, but insane to live. corruption for a farang, is not a problem unless you live rural. stay away from drugs (yaddy yah) and you’ll be fine.

          • BuzzCoastin

            The Thai people are the best.  Bangkok is my favorite city and not just for the gyrlz; it’s a great mix of East & West. During the last 5 years I have spent about a year (off & on) in Thailand.  The corruption is usually confined to locals.  I have never needed to buy my way out of a jam, but it can be done. I know several expats from the EU and US living and working in Bangkok and they seem to be having a great time.

            If you like hot weather, friendly people, pretty gyrls (or boyz), greart food, and reasonable prices, then you will love BKK.

      • Tuna Ghost

        She is, isn’t she?  She looks so young.  

  • Anonymous

    thats what confused me….the “red-shirts” supported her I thought?

  • Anonymous

    Just move to Asia, and yes she is a quite attractive Prime Minister

  • Hadrian999

    i’m actually thinking about it once i finish up my free education

  • Anonymous

    In response, Thailand’s ultra-conservative right wing founded the ‘Soy-Sauce Party” which is hell bent on making sure she fails, but is totally not sexist.

  • Redacted

    In response, Thailand’s ultra-conservative right wing founded the ‘Soy-Sauce Party” which is hell bent on making sure she fails, but is totally not sexist.

    • Jin The Ninja

      lol and i liked it! but thais use fish sauce not soya!

  • ChangeICan’tBelieveIN

    She sounds like Thailand’s Obama …

  • Anonymous

    lol and i liked it! but thais use fish sauce not soya!

  • ChangeICan’tBelieveIN

    She sounds like Thailand’s Obama …

  • Anonymous

    They did, but there are two red shirt factions, one is the supposed marxists and the other are the supporters of Thaksin (her brother in exile). The red shirts are the rural people and the urban working poor- Thaksin is corrupt no doubt, but he did promise huge rural infrastructure spending and income stipends for people on the poverty line. He also promised thais, tvs, cell phones and free k-12 education. This obviously bothered the conservative old guard, since thaksin is a telecomm billionaire, and would be posed to collect money from all the cell phones promised to poor people. It’s a very convoluted and not easy to discern…There is no obvious polarisation of the factions or the political parties because all are legally obligated to be pro-monarchy. The monarchy supports the most conservative parties (known colloquially as the yellow shirts), but because there is no real opposition  in parliament- all parties tend to look the same. I can say that Thaksin and Yingluck being ethnic chinese does nothing to endear them to the entrenched old guard.

  • Haystack

    It’s heartening to hear that this enlightened Asian country is finally catching up to the United States by electing a female head of state…oh, wait.

  • Haystack

    It’s heartening to hear that this enlightened Asian country is finally catching up to the United States by electing a female head of state…oh, wait.

  • Anonymous

    Thank you for the enlightening response.

  • http://buzzcoastin.posterous.com BuzzCoastin

    I left the Homeland of the Free about 10 years ago and have been living in Asia for about 4 years now; I have no complaints. Thailand is a super place, even during the political uprising I never had a problem. However, like everywhere else, politics is synonymous with corruption.

  • Anonymous

    I am seriously considering it myself

  • http://voxmagi-necessarywords.blogspot.com/ VoxMagi

    Someone lift its tail and check its gender…hey…its Thailand…you can’t be too careful. ;-)

  • http://voxmagi-necessarywords.blogspot.com/ VoxMagi

    Someone lift its tail and check its gender…hey…its Thailand…you can’t be too careful. ;-)

  • Anonymous

    The rationale is pretty much that “we don’t like the military having so much power” and because people liked her brother. It’s a better rationale than most out there.

  • Tuna Ghost

    She is, isn’t she?  She looks so young.  

  • Tuna Ghost

    She is, isn’t she?  She looks so young.  

  • Tuna Ghost

    I’ve been considering Thailand once I leave South Korea.  I’ve been there before, but I only got to see Bangkok and Phuket.  Which area would you recommend for living/working?  How are the locals?  You mentioned the corruption, is that something you run into a lot?  

  • Tuna Ghost

    I’ve been considering Thailand once I leave South Korea.  I’ve been there before, but I only got to see Bangkok and Phuket.  Which area would you recommend for living/working?  How are the locals?  You mentioned the corruption, is that something you run into a lot?  

  • Tuna Ghost

    There’s a ton of teaching opportunities in that part of the world, as long as you have at least a bachelor’s degree and no criminal record.  Actually, as long as you can get a backround check from any state, you’re good to go in that area.  

  • Anonymous

    not buzz, but i thought i’d give a crack…

    chiang mai or bangkok for teaching (to make money). if you don’t care so much about money you can get a lower paid post in a rural area (much lower), but in exchange you can get a nice little house (paid for), and you can see how a real village works. Thais are very friendly, if you can get by in Korean society, you’ll have NO problems in thailand. I like korea, but i found it hard to read people. thais are gregarious, unless they really lose it.
    but saving face is a big thing. Northwest has a lot of mining, industrial things, south has occasional seperatist violence but the best food, central is poorest, and bangkok is cool for a spell, but insane to live. corruption for a farang, is not a problem unless you live rural. stay away from drugs (yaddy yah) and you’ll be fine.

  • Anonymous

    not buzz, but i thought i’d give a crack…

    chiang mai or bangkok for teaching (to make money). if you don’t care so much about money you can get a lower paid post in a rural area (much lower), but in exchange you can get a nice little house (paid for), and you can see how a real village works. Thais are very friendly, if you can get by in Korean society, you’ll have NO problems in thailand. I like korea, but i found it hard to read people. thais are gregarious, unless they really lose it.
    but saving face is a big thing. Northwest has a lot of mining, industrial things, south has occasional seperatist violence but the best food, central is poorest, and bangkok is cool for a spell, but insane to live. corruption for a farang, is not a problem unless you live rural. stay away from drugs (yaddy yah) and you’ll be fine.

  • http://buzzcoastin.posterous.com BuzzCoastin

    The Thai people are the best.  Bangkok is my favorite city and not just for the gyrlz; it’s a great mix of East & West. During the last 5 years I have spent about a year (off & on) in Thailand.  The corruption is usually confined to locals.  I have never needed to buy my way out of a jam, but it can be done. I know several expats from the EU and US living and working in Bangkok and they seem to be having a great time.

    If you like hot weather, friendly people, pretty gyrls (or boyz), greart food, and reasonable prices, then you will love BKK.

  • guest

    Gorgeous

  • guest

    Gorgeous

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